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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

A. Coskun and Cheryl J. Frohlich

Considers the dehumanization and weak service performance in thebanking industry as it seeks to increase its efficiency. Argues thatsince customers are demanding more…

Abstract

Considers the dehumanization and weak service performance in the banking industry as it seeks to increase its efficiency. Argues that since customers are demanding more humanized banking, banks must narrow this gap between supply and demand by evaluating their marketing deficiencies and becoming more proactive. Considers a model for developing a bank′s effectiveness and improving customer satisfaction, thus developing a competitive edge.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

C. Bruce Kavan, Cheryl J. Frohlich and A. Coskun Samli

Many service organizations′ corporate mission is “to be number one indelivering service to customers”. The use of traditional financialaccounting measures as performance…

Abstract

Many service organizations′ corporate mission is “to be number one in delivering service to customers”. The use of traditional financial accounting measures as performance indicators has led to an inappropriate reliance on internal information resulting in an unbalanced information system and, therefore, by definition a dysfunctional strategy. A balanced information system must provide information on both internal operations and external customer satisfaction. In order to optimize overall performance in service organizations, a balanced information system is critical. The long run survival of a service business depends on the appropriate balance between internal information (efficiency) and external information (effectiveness). Both internal information (efficiency) and external information (effectiveness) must be used as complements to each other in order to fulfill long‐term corporate goals. Reliance on internal information or the substitution of internal information for needed external information will not result in the long‐term fulfillment of the corporate mission. Obviously any organizational system that is closed to the environment will develop entropy.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Michael Naor, Ednilson S. Bernardes, Cheryl T Druehl and Yoram Shiftan

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a company which developed an environmentally friendly innovation attempted to address diffusion issues. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a company which developed an environmentally friendly innovation attempted to address diffusion issues. Specifically, the purpose is to describe the ways in which an electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure company, in partnership with a major car manufacturer, tried to address barriers to diffusion of an environmentally friendly innovation during the development stage to improve the likelihood of success and lessons learned from its failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explore a single instrumental case of an Israeli company that developed infrastructure for EVs in partnership with a major automaker. The authors collected data using a series of semi-structured interviews at the companies’ headquarters, through direct observation in the company, and through the examination of archival and secondary data sources.

Findings

The authors find that the company tried to incorporate design features in both the product and organization to address key diffusion barriers identified through survey and consumer focus research. The study maps product/service design innovations for infrastructure that combined with multi-stage organizational diffusion strategies for EVs, were used to address both functional (usage, value, and risk) and psychological (tradition and image) barriers for mass-market adoption.

Practical implications

The study provides insights on how to incorporate information about barriers to adoption into product/service design and on the development of organizational-level diffusion strategy to address changes of customer’s behavior required by certain innovative sustainable solutions. In addition, the authors speculate potential causes for more recent developments with the technology that can serve as a lesson for future projects.

Originality/value

Past studies have advanced the knowledge about issues surrounding the adoption and diffusion of EVs. The study expands this stream of research by focussing on product/service and organizational strategy design and by illustrating, through an empirical exploratory case study, how a company attempted to overcome these obstacles. The authors advance various propositions and point out potential exciting avenues for future research on the dissemination of environmentally friendly innovations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Katrien Verleye

Several researchers struggle with designing, writing-up and reviewing case study research, but constructing a template for describing and justifying methodological choices…

Abstract

Purpose

Several researchers struggle with designing, writing-up and reviewing case study research, but constructing a template for describing and justifying methodological choices is – in contrast with quantitative research – undesirable due to the creative nature of qualitative research. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the multitude of paths to rigorous case study research and promote rigorous case study research in the service community.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon a review of seminal articles and textbooks, different paths to rigorous case study research are identified. Subsequently, these paths are compared with existing practices in case studies in service research published between March 2017 and April 2019.

Findings

Seminal articles and textbooks detail different paths to achieve rigor with regard to research purpose, design, data, analyses and write-up. Overall, the most popular paths in the service community are those proposed by Eisenhardt and Yin. Meanwhile, service researchers increasingly challenge the dichotomy between the inductive and deductive logic by choosing an abductive logic. Transparency and reflexivity are the main points of attention among service researchers doing case study research.

Originality/value

By providing insight into the multitude of paths to rigorous case study research along with their popularity in the service community, this paper helps service researchers to balance rigor and creativity when engaging in case study research. Additionally, this paper offers a framework for reviewing case study research in terms of rigor and creativity.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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