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Article

Richard A. Feinberg, Ik‐Suk Kim, Leigh Hokama, Ko de Ruyter and Cherie Keen

There has been, and will be, a spectacular growth in the number of call centers on both sides of the Atlantic. So far, however, empirical evidence is lacking as to the…

Abstract

There has been, and will be, a spectacular growth in the number of call centers on both sides of the Atlantic. So far, however, empirical evidence is lacking as to the operational determinants of caller satisfaction in call centers, despite the multitude of call performance metrics registered in many call centers. Undertakes an empirical assessment of the relationship between caller satisfaction and a number of critical variables. The results are astonishing. Of all the critical operational determinants only “percentage of calls closed on first contact” and “average abandonment” have a significant, albeit weak, influence on caller satisfaction. Concludes, therefore, with a call for more research into reliable and valid predictors of caller satisfaction.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article

Arjan Burgers, Ko de Ruyter, Cherie Keen and Sandra Streukens

Listening to the voice of the customer has been embraced in marketing theory and practice for a long time. However, the wide scale implementation of call centers has only…

Abstract

Listening to the voice of the customer has been embraced in marketing theory and practice for a long time. However, the wide scale implementation of call centers has only recently enabled managers to take this adage to the next level. At the same time, it is acknowledged that the evaluation of service delivery often depends on the so‐called “service encounter”, or the time of interaction between the service firm and customer. Extensive research has been conducted in the field of traditional face‐to‐face encounters, but no attempt has yet been made to categorize customer expectations with regard to employee behavior during voice‐to‐voice encounters. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a measurement instrument that identifies key customer expectation dimensions with regard to call center representative (CCR) behavior. Based on the services marketing literature, 13 potential attributes were empirically tested on an effective sample of 206 respondents. This resulted in a model consisting of four different sub‐scales that were labeled “adaptiveness”, “assurance”, “empathy”, and “authority”. The results of the validity‐ and reliability‐testing confirm the solidity of the measurement instrument.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Book part

Cherie Chu

Mentoring programmes for students have been made ‘popular’ with the increase in New Zealand universities over the past 10 years. These programmes have targeted the groups…

Abstract

Mentoring programmes for students have been made ‘popular’ with the increase in New Zealand universities over the past 10 years. These programmes have targeted the groups of ‘low achieving’ students, especially those of Pacific ethnicity, who have been identified as students who need academic support. For the universities, the main priority has been to increase the academic achievement levels of the students. Mentoring has value and it is beneficial for all of those involved. However, there needs to be examination and analysis of mentoring programmes, especially with regard to the impacts. As a practitioner and theorist of mentoring, I present a personal exploration of the interpersonal relationships formed in mentoring between myself and my students so that a clearer depiction of mentoring relationships may occur for those have a keen interest with Pacific students. The nature of mentoring in a university context is challenging but with the philosophical approach of appreciative mentorship, the challenges quickly fade into the background. Mentoring as a process of relationship development is critical for the successful academic futures of Pacific students in tertiary education.

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Māori and Pasifika Higher Education Horizons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-703-0

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Article

David Pollitt

Covers a special issue of this journal (E+T) which looks at various ways of keeping the workforce data specific and able to adapt. States that some of the articles explore…

Abstract

Covers a special issue of this journal (E+T) which looks at various ways of keeping the workforce data specific and able to adapt. States that some of the articles explore the relationship between employers and the education world of business. Draws on experiences from the USA, the UK and Europe; and among the businesses discussed are: Microsoft; IBM; Maytag corp.; Vauxhall; St John Ambulance; McDonald‘s; Bradford Management Centre; Bayer; Newcastle upon Tyne City Council and the University of Northumbria; University of Leuven (Belgium); and Stanford University Office of Technology licensing. Proposes that the overriding theme herein is that the lethargy within UK companies must be overcome if the UK is to remain an economy with competitiveness as its catchword. Concludes that the recruitment of the right people, allied to training, will lead to retainment of the staff and increases in creativity and productivity.

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Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part

Patrick Blessinger and John M. Carfora

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to improve faculty and…

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to improve faculty and institutional development and to strengthen the interconnections between teaching, learning, and research. This chapter provides a synthesis and analysis of all the chapters in the volume, which present a range of perspectives, case studies, and empirical research on how IBL is being used across a range of courses across a range of institutions to enhance faculty and institutional development. This chapter argues that the IBL approach has great potential to enhance and transform teaching and learning. Given the growing demands placed on education to meet a diverse range of complex political, economic, and social problems and personal needs, this chapter argues that education should be a place where lifelong and lifewide learning is cultivated and where self-directed learning is nurtured. To that end, this chapter argues that IBL helps cultivate a learning environment that is more meaningful, responsive, integrated, and purposeful.

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Inquiry-based Learning for Faculty and Institutional Development: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-235-7

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Article

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk…

Abstract

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk distributor because he failed to comply with a requirement that he should provide protective curtains to his milk floats, was a rare and in many ways, an interesting event. The Tribunal in this case was set up under reg. 16(2) (f), Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963, constituted in accordance with Part I, clause 2 (2), Schedule 4 of the Regulations. Part II outlines procedure for such tribunals. The Tribunal is similar to that authorized by S.30, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, which deals with the registration of dairymen, dairy farms and farmers, and the Milk and Dairies (General) Regulations, 1959. Part II, Schedule 2 of the Act provided for reference to a tribunal of appeals against refusal or cancellation of registration by the Ministry, but of producers only. A local authority's power to refuse to register or cancellation contained in Part I, Schedule 2 provided for no such reference and related to instances where “public health is or is likely to be endangered by any act or default” of such a person, who was given the right of appeal against refusal to register, etc., to a magistrates' court. No such limitation exists in respect of the revoking, suspending, refusal to renew a licence under the Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963; an appeal against same lies to the Minister, who must refer the matter to a tribunal, if the person so requests. This occurred in the case under discussion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Steven Lysonski, Srinivas Durvasula and John Watson

New Zealand has gone through a radical metamorphosis since free market economics were introduced in the mid‐1980s. Marketing managers are particularly interested in the…

Abstract

New Zealand has gone through a radical metamorphosis since free market economics were introduced in the mid‐1980s. Marketing managers are particularly interested in the views of consumers about issues dealing with marketing activities. Negative views could signal consumer backlash against free market activities. This study examines the views of consumers from 1986 to 2001 on a range of issues dealing with marketing and consumerism. The results clearly show that consumers are less negative about marketing and consumerism issues since 1986. It seems likely that New Zealand has evolved in terms of the consumerism life cycle over the last 15 years. Marketing managers should continue to remain proactive in their responses to consumer discontents. Implications for New Zealand and for other countries are addressed.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Doirean Wilson

This explorative paper is based on the professional career of Councillor Gill Sargeant who completed her term of office as Mayor of the London Borough of Barnet, in May…

Abstract

This explorative paper is based on the professional career of Councillor Gill Sargeant who completed her term of office as Mayor of the London Borough of Barnet, in May 2001. This paper chronicles the life of a twenty‐first century woman living and working in a “digitally” lead age, faced with the challenges of a traditional business environment. The paper also identifies the impact of key “drivers” and “barriers” to the development of women's careers such as, childcare responsibilities, technology, gender stereotypes and family friendly policies, as faced by a modern day Mayor.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article

Louise F. Pendry, Avril J. Mewse and Carole B. Burgoyne

The present research aims to investigate parental attitudes towards using either cloth or disposable nappies, to better understand whether and how pro‐cloth initiatives…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research aims to investigate parental attitudes towards using either cloth or disposable nappies, to better understand whether and how pro‐cloth initiatives might impact parental decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted with both cloth and disposable nappy users to gain a better understanding of the factors that underlie their choice. Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The paper finds that parents using disposable nappies believed they were marketed as offering a popular, efficient, healthy, good value system. They acknowledged the environmental impact but rationalised this by referring to the equivocal nature of these consequences, and the ability to off‐set this by engaging in other pro‐environment behaviours. Parents choosing cloth nappies did so initially because they were more environment‐friendly and cost‐effective and disposables were disliked. Once using cloth, parents noted additional benefits: performance, fashion, formation of bonds with other users, and getting a buzz out of using them. This reinforced their reasons for continued use.

Practical implications

Cloth nappies are unlikely to gain mass appeal, but findings suggest a bigger take up if parents are better informed, and subsidies are provided to reduce set‐up and laundering costs to tackle the “ease of use” barrier. The positive aspects of cloth nappies should be better promoted.

Social implications

Marketing initiatives need to buy into the current “designer parents” trend and play to the aspirational, fashionable aspects of cloth nappies.

Originality/value

This paper, the first to report on parental attitudes and decisions regarding both nappy types, could inform public policy and marketing decisions.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

Beverly Dawn Metcalfe and Marianne Afanassieva

The aim of this paper will be to examine the social and economic changes that have shaped women's work identity in the USSR and Russian Federation. Based on interview…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper will be to examine the social and economic changes that have shaped women's work identity in the USSR and Russian Federation. Based on interview research with 30 female professionals in St Petersburg, Russia, we unravel the complexities of the “woman question” in soviet discourse and explore the individual subjectivities of managing gender and managing transition.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a life‐history qualitative research approach. We examine how transition from a Marxist system to a free market economy has impacted employment experiences of women.

Findings

It is shown that women have traditionally progressed in managerial and professional fields in Soviet society but that this advancement is being reversed during transition stages. Emphasising the socio‐political legacies of the Soviet gender order, we highlight how dominant gender roles are being reinforced along essentialist lines. The results highlight how women's work identity is being reconstructed along stereotypically feminine lines. This feminisation of work identity however, focuses on the aesthetic qualities of being a professional woman rather than on personal managerial qualities. We argue that the construction and reconstruction of a feminine professional self is an important aspect of managing gender and transition. The results also highlight an increase in discriminatory practices in HR systems and that women face both cultural and organisational barriers to their career advancement.

Originality/value

The paper argues that socialist ideology did not solve the woman question, but rather produced different forms of gendered inequalities. It suggests that equal opportunities will only be achieved when organisations comply with employment legislation. The research provides important insights into the gendered management processes within transitional contexts, which have previously remained uncharted.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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