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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Chia-Yi Liu, Cheng-Yu Lee and Hsin-Ju Stephie Tsai

Although a number of studies have researched food firms’ unethical practices, the mechanisms used to prevent these practices remain underexplored from the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a number of studies have researched food firms’ unethical practices, the mechanisms used to prevent these practices remain underexplored from the perspective of corporate governance. As independent directors (IDs) have been viewed as a mechanism to deter corporate misconducts, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the influences of the ratio of IDs on the board, IDs’ industrial experience and their participation in corporate governance training courses on food firms’ unethical production practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a sample of 239 firm-year observations in Taiwanese food industries. The Poisson model with fixed effects was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that board independence and IDs with food industry expertise were not effective in deterring food firms from unethical production practices. The expected monitoring function of IDs would only realize when they complete a sufficient number of corporate governance training courses. These courses can make IDs aware of their responsibilities and roles in governing firms.

Originality/value

This study is the first to identify the effects of corporate governance practices on food firms’ unethical production practices. The value of this study may provide food firms practical solutions that enable corporate executives to behave ethically.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Cheng-Yu Lee, Yen-Chih Huang and Chia-Chi Chang

Although scholars have paid considerable attention to the relationship between technological diversification and firm performance, research on this relationship has…

Abstract

Purpose

Although scholars have paid considerable attention to the relationship between technological diversification and firm performance, research on this relationship has produced mixed findings. To reconcile these inconsistent findings, this study, thus, aims to revisit the performance effect of technological diversification by considering two organizational characteristics as crucial moderators, namely, firm size and financial slack.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the research hypotheses, the research sample covers manufacturing firms in the 2008 Standard & Poor (S&P) 500 index. Data regarding the characteristics and patent information of the sample firms were obtained from Compustat and the US Patent and Trademark Office. The hypotheses were tested by using hierarchical regression models.

Findings

In a sample of 168 S&P 500 manufacturing firms, this study finds that technological diversification has a positive effect on firm performance. The relationship between technological diversification and firm performance is also found to be positively moderated by firm size, financial slack and their configuration.

Originality/value

The findings of this study further suggest that firms should be aware that the effect of technological diversification on performance can be enhanced or hindered in specific contexts.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Quang-Anh Le and Cheng-Yu Lee

This study aims to analyze the link between earnings pressure and R&D cut as well as the moderating effects of family control and debt.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the link between earnings pressure and R&D cut as well as the moderating effects of family control and debt.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 6,130 firm-year observations of Taiwanese-listed firms were used to test the hypotheses by using a panel data regression with fixed effects estimation.

Findings

The study reveals that earnings pressure is positively related to R&D cut, and this relationship can be softened when having the presence of family control and debt.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted based on some conditions: data collection comes from a single source, earnings pressure mainly comes from analysts, R&D intensity is significant among industries, debt is a given condition to managers. Future studies, thus, are suggested to use other approaches to have further information and extend the knowledge without these conditions.

Practical implications

Under the pressure of meeting analyst forecast, managers have more opportunities to flourish their priority on improving temporary profits rather than implementing R&D investments with costly budget but unpredictable outcomes. In addition to responding to the positive effect of earnings pressure on trimming long-term corporate investments, this study also found some corporate governance mechanisms to soften the managerial short-termism behavior.

Originality/value

The findings partially contribute to broadening the existing knowledge base on the impact of earnings pressure on corporate activities and how some mechanisms serve as moderators.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Huei-Wen Pao, Cheng-Yu Lee, Pi-Hui Chung and Hsueh-Liang Wu

The industry-wide adoption of a novel practice is often considered to be an institutional change. Although research on institutionalization has been accumulating, how and…

Abstract

Purpose

The industry-wide adoption of a novel practice is often considered to be an institutional change. Although research on institutionalization has been accumulating, how and why embedded actors in the field become motivated to embrace change that remains sidelined. Viewing the introduction of a new human resource management practice, the recruitment of non-compulsory certified manpower, which is still in its infancy in the service sector of Taiwan, as a new institution, the purpose of this paper is to identify the distinct motives behind firms’ hiring decisions, and examine the extent to which such hiring decisions are contingent on institutional conditions and firm attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to test the hypotheses were drawn from a survey on service firms in Taiwan in the second half of 2011. Hypotheses were examined through moderated hierarchical regression analyses in a sample of 254 Taiwanese service firms across major sectors.

Findings

Integrating the resource dependency and social contagion views, the study contends that resource scarcity drives, or legitimacy enables, service firms to deviate from traditional hiring patterns and instead adopt new preferences toward certified manpower. The study not only shows that social factors should be incorporated into the diffusion of a new HR recruitment practice in the service sector, which is traditionally based upon economic considerations, but also sheds light on the context-dependent nature of the process of institutional innovation.

Originality/value

This study is an attempt not only to test a dual-theoretical model on the extent to which a service firm’s new hiring pattern is influenced by two distinct types of motivation, but also to evidence how an institutional innovation, in terms of the regime of service manpower certification, takes root and spreads in the field. The managerially discretional account of the resource dependence theory needs to be reconciled with social contagion theory, which highlights the influence of collective actions and so provides a better understanding of the diffusion of new HR recruitment practices in the service industry.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2019

Chia-Yi Liu and Cheng-Yu Lee

The spatial and psychological distance within agri-food chains provides both profit and risk for supply chain members. Grounded on the transaction cost economics (TCE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The spatial and psychological distance within agri-food chains provides both profit and risk for supply chain members. Grounded on the transaction cost economics (TCE) and institutional theory (IT), the purpose of this paper is to test whether the adoption of multiple supply chains (MSCs), which adopt both traditional and shortened supply chains, can be used to manage uncertainty and mitigate the risk associated with a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test the hypothesis, matched questionnaire surveys were developed to collect the data from farm managers and consumers. Completed questionnaires were received from 112 respondents. The hierarchical regression analysis was performed to test hypotheses.

Findings

The result shows the positive effects of environmental and behavioral uncertainties on MSC adoption and represents the diminished moderating effects of institutions (industrial and consumption tendency) on the relationship between uncertainties and MSA adoption.

Research limitations/implications

This study only explored producers and their recommended consumers; future studies can undertake questionnaire designs (one producer-to-many consumers) and empirical analyses with analytic hierarchy process theory to reexamine the hypotheses proposed in this study.

Practical implications

MSC adoption is a way to manage uncertainties resulting from spatial and psychological distance in the supply chain. Producers and consumers show their risk preferences by SC adoption after considering pre-constructed societal norms. Therefore, the consumers’ and producers’ choice of a supply chain reflects a process of communicating risk. The adoption of a mixed governance mode (MSC adoption) and accessing information about common practices are two ways to decrease such uncertainties.

Social implications

There are multiple goals (traceability, fairness, efficiency, well-being) in the food supply chain that may be satisfied by MSC adoption. Therefore, policymakers should understand the different values of various supply chains and facilitate the development of various supply chain modes.

Originality/value

This study integrated the undersocialized and oversocialized perspectives (TCE and IT) to understand how uncertainties of supply chains may be diminished. Based on these perspectives, it found that the adoption of the mixed governance mode and accessing of institutional information are two ways to decrease such uncertainties.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Huei-Wen Pao, Hsueh-Liang Wu, Shih-Ping Ho and Cheng-Yu Lee

To heed the calls for more inquiries into the tacit behavior in the partnering process and the latent rules underpinning the success of partnerships, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

To heed the calls for more inquiries into the tacit behavior in the partnering process and the latent rules underpinning the success of partnerships, the purpose of this paper is to develop a process model that explains when and how partner fit triggers the generation of trust through the sense making of fairness and similarity, and then yields performance by overcoming uncertainties jeopardizing the collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop a comprehensive but parsimonious model for international partnership, the study involves observing and interpreting the accounts of project managers, which suggest the use of an exploratory approach based on case studies. The research setting is six cross-country partnerships operating in East Asian countries during 2005-2009 with each joint project involving Taiwanese construction companies and at least one local partner.

Findings

The evidence shows that inter-partner trust conduces to project performance by reducing the threat of behavioral and environmental uncertainty. The findings confirm the general thesis that the performance implication of inter-partner trust is not uniform but contingent on both the types of trust and the uncertainty in the partnering process.

Originality/value

Although not the first in the literature of collaborative dynamics, the paper contributes to identifying the latent constructs in the partnering process and highlighting the context-dependent nature of a successful partnership.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Cheng‐Yu Lee and Yen‐Chih Huang

This study aims to examine the relationships among knowledge stock, ambidextrous learning, and firm performance while considering the moderating effect of firm size.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships among knowledge stock, ambidextrous learning, and firm performance while considering the moderating effect of firm size.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses R&D scoreboard database to produce a sample of 312 firms which operate in technologically intensive industries. To test the research hypotheses, regression analysis is employed.

Findings

The major findings are: the positive performance implications of ambidextrous learning; knowledge stock as an antecedent of ambidextrous learning; the mediating role of ambidextrous learning; and firm size as a contingency factor that strengthens the influence of ambidextrous learning on firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the scope of the research, only patent data were used to measure knowledge stock and ambidextrous learning. However, the measurement of these variables may have been influenced by the availability of patent information.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that realizing superior performance is dependent on a firm's accumulated knowledge stock and its ability to balance exploratory and exploitative learning. Large firms extract more value from ambidextrous learning than small firms.

Originality/value

This study is the first to identify the mediating role of ambidextrous learning in the relationship between knowledge stock and firm performance and to confirm that firm size moderates the relationship between ambidextrous learning and firm performance. The value of this study lies in developing a model of ambidextrous learning that includes both mediating and moderating variables.

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

In a sample of 168 S&P 500 manufacturing firms, this study finds that technological diversification has a positive effect on firm performance. The relationship between technological diversification and firm performance is also found to be positively moderated by firm size, financial slack, and their configuration.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Yu-Cheng Lin, Chyi Lin Lee and Graeme Newell

As significant listed property investment vehicles, industrial and logistics REITs (I&L REITs) have recently enhanced their property portfolios, often replacing the…

Abstract

Purpose

As significant listed property investment vehicles, industrial and logistics REITs (I&L REITs) have recently enhanced their property portfolios, often replacing the traditional industrial properties with logistic properties to gain strategic exposure to recent e-commerce trends. This paper aims to assess the investment performance of I&L REITs by assessing the significance, risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits of I&L REITs in the Pacific Rim region from July 2011 to December 2018. The strategic property investment implications for I&L REITs are also identified.

Design/methodology/approach

Monthly total returns from July 2011 to December 2018 were used to analyse the risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits for I&L REITs in the United States, Japan, Australia and Singapore. An asset allocation diagram was employed to assess the strategic role of I&L REITs in a mixed-asset portfolio in each case.

Findings

I&L REITs generally possessed superior average annual returns compared with the other sub-sector REITs, stocks and bonds in the United States, Japan, Australia and Singapore between July 2011 and December 2018, with desirable portfolio diversification benefits. Importantly, a more significant role for I&L REITs was generally observed in the mixed-asset portfolio compared to the other sub-sector REITs in each of these four markets across the broad portfolio risk spectrum. This reflects I&L REITs delivering enhanced portfolio returns and offering portfolio diversification benefits in a mixed-asset portfolio in the United States, Japan, Australia and Singapore.

Practical implications

Property investors, particularly property securities funds (PSFs) and income-oriented investors, should consider including I&L REITs in their mixed-asset portfolios, as Pacific Rim–based I&L REITs provided an attractive REIT investment sub-sector, co-existing alongside the other sub-sector REITs and major asset classes in a mixed-asset portfolio in a Pacific Rim context, as well as being a portfolio diversifier. These results confirm the added-value and strategic role of I&L REITs in a mixed-asset portfolio, seeing I&L REITs as an effective investment pathway for I&L property exposure in the Pacific Rim region.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess the investment performance of I&L REITs in the Pacific Rim region, evaluating their significance, risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits, and the role of I&L REITs in a mixed-asset portfolio in the United States, Japan, Australia and Singapore. More importantly, this research is the first paper to provide empirical evidence on I&L REITs, which have often transformed their traditional industrial property portfolios with increased levels of logistics property to gain exposure to recent e-commerce trends. This research enables more informed and practical property investment decision-making regarding I&L REITs and their added-value and strategic role in a mixed-asset portfolio, as well as delivering effective I&L property exposure in the Pacific Rim region, with the added benefits of liquidity, transparency and fiscal efficiency.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Yu Cheng Lin, Chyi Lin Lee and Graeme Newell

Residential Real Estate Investment Trusts in Japan (residential J-REITs) have become an increasingly significant listed property sector recently. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Residential Real Estate Investment Trusts in Japan (residential J-REITs) have become an increasingly significant listed property sector recently. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of residential J-REITs in a mixed-asset portfolio context in Japan by assessing the significance, risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits of residential J-REITs over July 2006–August 2018. The ongoing property investment implications for residential J-REITs are also identified.

Design/methodology/approach

Using monthly total returns, the risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits for residential J-REITs over July 2006–August 2018 are assessed. An asset allocation diagram is employed to assess the role of residential J-REITs in a mixed-asset portfolio context in Japan.

Findings

Residential J-REITs generally delivered superior risk-adjusted returns compared with the other sub-sector J-REITs, stocks and bonds in Japan over July 2006–August 2018, with desirable portfolio diversification benefits in the full mixed-asset portfolio context. Importantly,residential J-REITs are observed as strongly contributing to the mixed-asset portfolio context in Japan across the portfolio risk spectrum, particularly in a post-GFC context. This also reflects that residential J-REITs provide high portfolio returns and strong portfolio diversification benefits in a mixed-asset portfolio context in Japan.

Practical implications

Residential J-REITs are effective and liquid residential property investment exposure in Japan. The results highlight the strong risk-adjusted performance of residential J-REITs in Japan’s mixed-asset portfolio context. This suggests institutional investors, particularly Japan institutional investors, should consider including residential J-REITs in their mixed-asset portfolios, as residential J-REITs are seen as a compelling investment product co-existing alongside the other sub-sector REITs and major asset classes in institutional investor portfolios in the context of Japan. This also confirms the effectiveness of institutionalised residential J-REITs. Given the solid residential property market fundamentals in Japan, an increased level of the institutionalisation of residential J-REITs can be expected.

Originality/value

The study is the first study to assess the effectiveness of residential J-REITs, via assessing the significance, risk-adjusted performance and portfolio diversification benefits of residential J-REITs and their role in a mixed-asset portfolio context in Japan. This research enables more informed and practical property investment decision making regarding the value-added and strategic role of residential J-REITs as effective and liquid residential property investment exposure in Japan, as well as an increasingly institutionalised property sector going forward.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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