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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Charlotte Travis and Pietro Murano

This paper is about an investigation into the usability of touch-based user interfaces. Currently, not enough knowledge is available to guide user interface designers and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is about an investigation into the usability of touch-based user interfaces. Currently, not enough knowledge is available to guide user interface designers and developers concerning the appropriate use of touch-based technology. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an empirical approach using an experiment to test the effectiveness and user satisfaction of touch-based interaction compared with equivalent mouse-based interaction. The authors had two abstract type tasks and one contextualised task using the two methods of interaction. The authors measured errors, task time and user satisfaction.

Findings

The data were statistically analysed and the statistically significant results show that overall the mouse-based interaction was faster, caused fewer errors and was preferred by the participants.

Originality/value

These results are interesting for all user interface designers and developers, where the authors make some design suggestions based on the empirical results. The results also add to the current knowledge the authors have regarding interaction with touch interfaces. Further, the authors also propose ways forward to enrich this research area of further knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2016

John Travis Spoede, Charlotte Fontenot and Cynthia Simpson

In a world of ever-changing educational trends, it is essential for educators to provide a continuum of services to meet the needs of all students. Therefore, employing an…

Abstract

In a world of ever-changing educational trends, it is essential for educators to provide a continuum of services to meet the needs of all students. Therefore, employing an inclusive structure or environment is imperative to the implementation of Special Education laws, according to Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Every Student Succeeds Act. As stipulated in law, all students should be educated in the least restrictive environment with their typically developing peers. This chapter focuses on the role of the special education professional as it specifically relates to the mainstream or inclusion setting. Topics covered in this chapter include an overview of inclusion, the inclusion model, an in-class support model, a content mastery model, and characteristics of an effective special educator, understanding disabilities, assessing and referring to appropriate supports, collecting data for individualized education program meetings, differentiated instruction, and strategies for inclusion. The goal of the chapter is to provide the overall view of inclusion in today’s classrooms in relation to the role of the special education teacher.

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Roles of Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-543-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Vivian B. Lord, Joseph B. Kuhns and Paul C. Friday

This paper aims to examine the impact of the implementation of community‐oriented policing and problem solving in a small city.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the implementation of community‐oriented policing and problem solving in a small city.

Design/methodology/approach

Citizen surveys that measure perceptions and activities of the police are completed before and three years after broader implementation of community policing. Because the existing literature supports the influence of a number of individual, neighborhood, and situational characteristics, several variables are included and controlled.

Findings

The results show that although the police invest a great deal of time building partnerships with and problem solving in neighborhoods, there are no significant differences over time in citizen satisfaction with police or in fear of crime. Personal contact with police mediates the influence of individual and neighborhood characteristics on citizen satisfaction. Police presence remains a common significant predictor of citizen satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Ensuring anonymity of subjects requires different samples between data collection periods; however, the same stratified random sampling process is used both times. The pre/post research design allows for measuring changes over time, but the lack of a control city threatens internal and external validity.

Practical implications

Citizen satisfaction is an important concern for all police and local governmental administrators; therefore, the findings of this study are useful for smaller agencies that are implementing or planning to implement community‐oriented policing.

Originality/value

With its focus on a small city and the capability to survey citizens before department‐wide implementation, this article expands research conducted on citizen satisfaction with police in a small town.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2016

Abstract

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Roles of Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-543-0

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

John Riley

Questions the approaches used for evaluating the success of community‐policing in the USA. Finds that reliance on crime and arrest statistics is not adequate. One of the new…

Abstract

Questions the approaches used for evaluating the success of community‐policing in the USA. Finds that reliance on crime and arrest statistics is not adequate. One of the new measures “knowledge of organizational personnel”, is examined reporting on the interest in and acceptance of the community‐policing philosophy among police officers working in a pilot programe in Anchorage, Alaska. Findings suggest that police officers took satisfaction in some aspects of the work but were frustrated and uncertain about others. Support for the programme is linked to three issues: desire for professional development, a desire for knowledge of area covered and an interest in creative and proactive problem solving.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Vanessa Kitzie, Travis Wagner and A. Nick Vera

This qualitative study explores how discursive power shapes South Carolina lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities' health…

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Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study explores how discursive power shapes South Carolina lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities' health information practices and how participants resist this power.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 28 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina engaged in semi-structured interviews and information world mapping–a participatory arts-based elicitation technique–to capture the context underlying how they and their communities create, seek, use and share health information. We focus on the information world maps for this paper, employing situational analysis–a discourse analytic method for visual data–to analyze them.

Findings

Six themes emerged describing how discursive power operates both within and outside of LGBTQIA+ communities: (1) producing absence, (2) providing unwanted information, (3) commoditizing LGBTQIA+ communities, (4) condensing LGBTQIA+ people into monoliths; (5) establishing the community's normative role in information practices; (6) applying assimilationist and metronormative discourses to information sources. This power negates people's information practices with less dominant LGBTQIA+ identities and marginalized intersectional identities across locations such as race and class. Participants resisted discursive power within their maps via the following tactics: (1) (re)appropriating discourses and (2) imagining new information worlds.

Originality/value

This study captures the perspectives of an understudied population–LGBTQIA+ persons from the American South–about a critical topic–their health–and frames these perspectives and topics within an informational context. Our use of information world mapping and situational analysis offers a unique and still underutilized set of qualitative methods within information science research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Lisa A. Boyce, R. Jeffrey Jackson and Laura J. Neal

This paper aims to employ a conceptual model to examine the relationship processes and mediating role of client‐coach relationship between client‐coach match criteria and coaching…

12329

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to employ a conceptual model to examine the relationship processes and mediating role of client‐coach relationship between client‐coach match criteria and coaching outcomes to advance the understanding of client‐coach relationship's impact on leadership coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 74 client‐coach pairs participating in a voluntary leadership coaching program at a military service academy during pre‐partnering and post‐transition phases were analyzed to examine the impact of match criteria and client‐coach relationship processes on coaching outcomes.

Findings

Consistent with the conceptual framework, relationship processes of rapport, trust, and commitment positively predicted coaching program outcomes, including client and coach reactions, behavioral change, and coaching program results. The client‐coach relationship fully mediated two match criteria (compatibility and credibility) with coaching outcomes, suggesting that complementary managerial and learning styles and relevant job‐related credibility support the development of client‐coach relationships and therefore positively impact leadership coaching programs.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of findings may be limited due to the population studied. Future research needs to examine relationship processes in the larger context of the coaching practice as well as formative and results‐level outcomes.

Practical implications

The research findings provide support and understanding of the impact of the client‐coach relationship on coaching and the understanding of factors influencing the relationship, which allows the development of selection tools to better match clients with coaches, increasing the quality of the relationship and ultimately the coaching outcomes.

Originality/value

The study represents one of the first attempts to symmetrically examine client‐coach relationships and highlights the value of the conceptual framework for conducting client‐coach relationship research.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Travis Holland and Lisa Watt

The Jurassic Park film franchise offers a complex portrayal of gender issues within a long-running science fiction action series, although not one without problematic moments…

Abstract

The Jurassic Park film franchise offers a complex portrayal of gender issues within a long-running science fiction action series, although not one without problematic moments. This chapter examines selected examples from the series to explore this complex picture. These include moments in the series that display female characters such as Ellie Sattler, Sarah Harding and Claire Dearing with power and agency and the top of their respective professions, noting that Jurassic Park is unusual among science fiction films for its presentation of such accomplished female characters. The chapter also addresses the sexualisation of the character Ian Malcolm and the role of the more typical ‘action star’ from later films, Owen Grady. Finally, it considers the question of sex-selection for the non-human characters, namely the dinosaurs, as significant plot points advance upon the premise that the entire dinosaur population in the series consists of non-breeding females, a fact that is later shown to be untrue. The chapter addresses each of these examples through key issues relating to the production, presentation, and violation of the human and non-human living body across the full Jurassic Park series.

Details

Gender and Action Films 1980-2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-506-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2017

Travis L. Wagner and Bobbie Bischoff

This chapter deploys qualitative interviews with employees of rural South Carolina cultural institutions to assess the state of their rural community archives in order to…

Abstract

This chapter deploys qualitative interviews with employees of rural South Carolina cultural institutions to assess the state of their rural community archives in order to understand both the practices and needs of the institutions within their relationship to larger, traditional archives with the aim to better understand national trends around community archives.

The research uses open-ended qualitative interviews based on snowball sampling focused on cultural institutions in populations defined as “rural” by the state of South Carolina. Using snowball sampling allowed for communities to self-identify other cultural institutions previously overlooked in surveys of rural South Carolina archival holdings.

Findings from the interviews provide new community-defined understandings of both practices and needs of rural community archives. Valuable insights include the following:

  • A clear awareness on the part of rural community archives of their relationship to larger practices of archiving

  • Notable moments of creativity by rural community archives concerning long-term self-sustenance

  • A continued need for low-cost, low-barrier methods of digital outreach for both preservation and communication

  • A more direct stream of access to grant funding favoring community archival practitioners over user-based research funding

A clear awareness on the part of rural community archives of their relationship to larger practices of archiving

Notable moments of creativity by rural community archives concerning long-term self-sustenance

A continued need for low-cost, low-barrier methods of digital outreach for both preservation and communication

A more direct stream of access to grant funding favoring community archival practitioners over user-based research funding

While many examples of community-based archival practice exist within British, Australian, and New Zealand research, such studies remain sparse and entity specific within the United States. This continued lack of case studies and models for understanding and aiding rural, community archives within the United States is only amplified when divided by regions and states. By focusing directly on the concerns of practitioners working to preserve and make available localized histories, this research illuminates both the incredible agency of rural community cultural institutions while re-conceptualizing the needs of such groups.

Details

Rural and Small Public Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-112-6

Keywords

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