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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Robert J. Chandler, Charlotte Swift and Wendy Goodman

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of cognitive behavioural approaches to treat a gentleman with a learning disability who had been reported to the police…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of cognitive behavioural approaches to treat a gentleman with a learning disability who had been reported to the police for allegedly making contact with children using social media in an attempt to initiate a romantic relationship using a single case design.

Design/methodology/approach

An 11 session cognitive behavioural intervention was employed, comprising of index offence analysis, challenging distorted cognitions related to the offence, developing an internal focus for responsibility and psychoeducation with regards to “staying safe” online.

Findings

Follow up data demonstrated no improvements in victim empathy, nor in agreement ratings in terms of key cognitions associated with responsibility for offending behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst treatment efficacy was not established, this case study raises important questions that go beyond the single case design. Whilst the gentleman reported becoming “safer” in terms of initiating contact with unknown people via social media, this could not be substantiated, and is indicative of the cardinal difficulty of monitoring online recidivism. Generalisability of findings to the wider learning disability population is limited by a single case design.

Originality/value

This is the first published case study to the authors knowledge to evaluate cognitive behavioural approaches to reduce antisocial internet related behaviour in a forensic learning disability setting. Findings of considered within the context of the concept of minimisation of offending behaviour, the concept of “counterfeit deviance”, and also how best to measure therapeutic change within this population.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2018

Holly Panting, Charlotte Swift, Wendy Goodman and Cara Davis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the Stages of Change (SOC) model can be applied to working with offenders with learning disabilities (LD), and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the Stages of Change (SOC) model can be applied to working with offenders with learning disabilities (LD), and furthermore, to determine if it might be efficacious for this approach to be incorporated into a wider service model for this population.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the results of a consultation to a specialist forensic LD service in the South West of England. A two-pronged approach was taken to consult to the service in relation to the research questions. First, a comprehensive literature review was undertaken, and second, other forensic LD teams and experts in the field were consulted.

Findings

There is a dearth of research that has examined the application of the SOC model to working with offenders with LD, and as such, firm conclusions cannot be drawn as to its efficacy in this population. The evidence base for the SOC model in itself is lacking, and has been widely critiqued. However, there are currently no other evidence-based models for understanding motivation to change in offenders with LD.

Research limitations/implications

There is a clear clinical need for more robust theory and research around motivation to change, which can then be applied to clinical work with offenders with LD.

Originality/value

There has been a historical narrative in offender rehabilitation that “nothing works” (Burrowes and Needs, 2009). As such, it is more important than ever for the evidence base to enhance the understanding of motivation to change in offending populations.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2010

Shamim Dinani, Wendy Goodman, Charlotte Swift and Teresa Treasure

This paper reports on the first eight years of a community‐based forensic team for people with learning disabilities. The authors give an overview of current research and…

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380

Abstract

This paper reports on the first eight years of a community‐based forensic team for people with learning disabilities. The authors give an overview of current research and government guidance regarding the prevalence, care pathway and treatment of people with learning disabilities who offend. The role and function of the community forensic team is described and an analysis of referrals to the service is given. The authors reflect on the frustrations as well as the achievements associated with providing this service.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Wendy Goodman, Janice Leggett, Emily Bladon, Charlotte Swift, Teresa Treasure and Mike Richardson

Mainstream offender treatment programmes are mainly inaccessible to offenders who have learning disabilities, which may mean those convicted of offences either receive…

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436

Abstract

Purpose

Mainstream offender treatment programmes are mainly inaccessible to offenders who have learning disabilities, which may mean those convicted of offences either receive inappropriate treatment or no offender treatment at all. There is developing, but patchy, provision of community‐based specialist offender treatment for people who have learning disabilities. This paper seeks to describe the evolving process of developing the Good Thinking! course, a group‐based offender treatment programme which aims to help address this need.

Design/methodology/approach

The Good Thinking! course comprises 23 two‐hour sessions run once a week in a community setting. It is based on the premise that people who commit offences are often trying to meet ordinary life goals through anti‐social means. It aims to help participants identify and understand their goals, develop the social skills necessary to attain them and teaches a problem‐solving strategy for more complex problems.

Findings

This paper describes the process of developing the course material, providing the course and adapting it in light of feedback from participants, referrers and carers. A description of the course and a case study are provided. Insufficient data have been produced to enable a formal evaluation of the effectiveness of the Good Thinking! course; as more data are generated, the team plan to achieve this.

Originality/value

The paper aims to inform and encourage clinicians and commissioners working in this field to increase the availability of specialist community‐based treatments for offenders who have learning disabilities.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Stephen Joseph, Charlotte Beer, David Clarke, Allan Forman, Martyn Pickersgill, Judy Swift, John Taylor and Victoria Tischler

In 2005, the Qualitative Methods in Psychosocial Health Research Group (QMiPHR) at the University of Nottingham was established as a forum to bring together academics…

Abstract

In 2005, the Qualitative Methods in Psychosocial Health Research Group (QMiPHR) at the University of Nottingham was established as a forum to bring together academics, researchers and practitioners with an interest in qualitative methods. The group has provided colleagues in nutrition, psychiatry, psychology, social work and sociology with a forum for discussion around the question of how qualitative research is able to contribute to understanding mental health and the development of evidence‐based treatment. As a group, we asked ourselves where we stood in relation to the use of qualitative methods in mental health. While we are unified in our view that qualitative research is important and under‐utilised in mental health research, our discussions uncovered a range of views on the underlying philosophical stance of what it means to be a qualitative researcher in mental health. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of our discussions and our view that as qualitative approaches have become more widely accepted they have largely been assimilated within the mainstream ‘medical model’ of research. In this paper, we call for researchers to re‐engage with the philosophical discussion on the role and purpose of qualitative enquiry as it applies to mental health, and for practitioners and decision‐makers to be aware of the implicit values underpinning research.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Eric Glasgow

This is a brief study of the character, and the professional career, of one of the most spectacular and prolific of all the huge medley of book‐publishers in Victorian…

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219

Abstract

This is a brief study of the character, and the professional career, of one of the most spectacular and prolific of all the huge medley of book‐publishers in Victorian London. George Smith is perhaps today somewhat overshadowed by other famous names. Nevertheless, in 1944, the Cambridge historian, G.M. Trevelyan, singled him from the rest: as the publisher of the monumental Dictionary of National Biography. As the nineteenth century’s cult of printed books inevitably now recedes in favour of information technology, perhaps the time is ripe for this succinct evaluation of an extraordinary publisher from Victorian times who promoted not only works by Leslie Stephen, Thackeray, and many other literary men but particularly works by women‐novelists, such as Charlotte Bronte and Elizabeth Gaskell, despite the fact that he was far from being a “feminist”, in our own contemporary sense.

Details

Library Review, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Reham Eltantawy, Antony Paulraj, Larry Giunipero, Dag Naslund and Abhinay A. Thute

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of supply management coordination among a prominent contact lens company (customer), its carton supplier (first tier)…

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2198

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of supply management coordination among a prominent contact lens company (customer), its carton supplier (first tier), and paperboard supplier (second tier). Adopting concepts within the theory of swift and even flow, the authors integrate the physical (material) and information flow among these supply partners to ensure higher productivity through timely production and distribution of the cartons, which reduced the lead-times and inventory levels at the three companies in this supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a longitudinal case study (action research (AR)), which combines qualitative and quantitative analyses. Observations over time, documents such as contracts, joint agreements, meeting agendas and minutes, personal conversations, and in-depth interviews were mainly used, with quantitative measurement of operational performance.

Findings

The complete solution to eliminate waste and improve the existing system is provided, as well as the ordering process solution in the form of service level models. The results of the study proved supply management coordination to be a pioneering approach in reducing inventory, reducing the safety stock at the buyer’s facility, improving the forecasts, lowering the product delivery lead-times, and establishing an information system throughout the three tiers of the supply chain.

Originality/value

The paper draws upon real-life data from a three echelon supply chain in the manufacturing industry. Combining this triadic focus with action-based research makes it a unique opportunity to reveal insights into the issue of coordination among supply chain members and consequent performance outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Thomas H. Stevenson and D. Anthony Plath

To provide financial service marketers with information useful in targeting and marketing financial services to Hispanic American consumers.

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1856

Abstract

Purpose

To provide financial service marketers with information useful in targeting and marketing financial services to Hispanic American consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

It profiles the changing demographics of the Hispanic American financial services market and, utilizing data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, tests three hypotheses to compare financial service consumption patterns of Hispanics with those of non‐Hispanic whites.

Findings

The paper shows that the Hispanic American segment has grown in size and importance over the last decade, but that Hispanics differ markedly from their non‐Hispanic White counterparts in terms of financial product preferences and investment asset portfolio composition. Further, Hispanic Americans trail their non‐Hispanic White counterparts in terms of breadth and depth of financial holdings, particularly in the area of more risky but historically higher return asset categories.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the results of financial decisions at one point in time. Future research could involve primary studies to determine whether, financial consumption behavior changes in Hispanics over time, as they become more acculturated, and why Hispanics favor liquid short‐term assets to more risky, but potentially higher returning, longer‐term instruments.

Originality/value

The article provides value to financial service providers by highlighting opportunities in the Hispanic American market and offering suggestions for more effectively marketing to the Hispanic community. Among the suggestions are recognizing and reflecting the importance of emotional positioning in financial services promotion, employing both Spanish and English language communications, and sponsoring Hispanic community‐based programs to build brand awareness and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Tammy Harel Ben Shahar

Legal and philosophical scholarship on religious education typically focuses on religious schools that challenge core liberal values. Religious schools that offer their…

Abstract

Legal and philosophical scholarship on religious education typically focuses on religious schools that challenge core liberal values. Religious schools that offer their students quality secular education, and whose religious character is mild, do not raise these concerns and have therefore evaded scrutiny thus far. This chapter argues that the latter kind of religious schools, which I call “creaming religious schools,” may have a negative effect on educational equality and should therefore be subject to restrictive legal regulation. The negative effect on equality is caused by the fact that when successful, these schools appeal not only to members of the religious community but also to non-member high-achieving students who leave the public schools (a process called creaming) thus weakening them. The chapter argues that the harm caused to public schools cannot be redeemed by alluding to the right to religious education because the religious justification for creaming religious schools is relatively weak. The chapter then examines several potential legal measures for contending with creaming religious schools: the antidiscrimination doctrine, which the chapter rejects, showing that it actually aggravates creaming, locating schools in disadvantaged neighborhoods, restricting tuition, reflective enrollment policy, and finally, the total prohibition of establishing creaming religious schools.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-727-1

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Marie-Line Germain

Abstract

Details

Integrating Service-Learning and Consulting in Distance Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-412-5

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