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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Charlotte Reid and Jon Young

Focuses on the needs of recent immigrant children in Canadiancities. Outlines the problems teachers face in the assessment, placementin classes and teaching of recent…

Abstract

Focuses on the needs of recent immigrant children in Canadian cities. Outlines the problems teachers face in the assessment, placement in classes and teaching of recent immigrant children in a Winnipeg area elementary school. Suggests that there should be specific policies relating to the education of these children taking into account the sociological realities of school life. The policies should provide a context and the resources to support school and classroom practices that enable teachers to define and operationalize sound educational experiences for immigrant children.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Bob Duckett

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Matthew Valasik, Shannon E. Reid and Matthew D. Phillips

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the temporary disbandment of a gang unit on collecting gang intelligence and arresting gang members in one of the Los…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the temporary disbandment of a gang unit on collecting gang intelligence and arresting gang members in one of the Los Angeles Police Department’s Community Policing Areas.

Design/methodology/approach

An interrupted time series methodology (ARIMA) is utilised to examine 1,429 field interview cards and 1,174 arrests of gang members that occurred from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011 within one police division.

Findings

Results indicated that the dismantling of the gang unit negatively impacted the collection of intelligence on gang members by officers, regardless of whether the officers were officially serving in the gang unit. Suppression efforts by gang unit officers also resulted in a sustained decline.

Originality/value

Given that many urban centres have specialised gang units, this study demonstrates how organisational turnover or disbandment of a gang unit negatively impacts a department’s ability to deal with local gang issues. Furthermore, these finding suggest that police organisations should consider such ramifications on intelligence-based policing activities.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Charlotte Maberly and Donald Reid

The purpose of this paper is to outline the curriculum of the UK’s first MSc in Gastronomy. The programme supports an interdisciplinary approach to understanding food not…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the curriculum of the UK’s first MSc in Gastronomy. The programme supports an interdisciplinary approach to understanding food not yet commonly found in academia or beyond. However, it is increasingly recognized that such a perspective, as fostered by the MSc Gastronomy, may be key in effectively addressing complex contemporary problems within food culture and food systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint paper that explains the rationale behind the chosen definition of Gastronomy, the context that inspired creation of the programme, an outline of the programme structure and justification of content.

Findings

The underpinning philosophy stems from a conviction that to address problems of corrupt food systems and problematic societal foodways, a more comprehensive understanding of food is needed. The programme seeks to cultivate this with a truly interdisciplinary approach to the study of food culture and food systems. This approach is recognized as an underrepresented area in academia where the study of food currently tends to be compartmentalized; a reductionist approach also mirrored within politics, commerce and our everyday lives. The MSc Gastronomy investigates how to foster and make commonplace, a more holistic and realistic understanding of food.

Originality/value

The MSc Gastronomy has been shaped by an understanding that a more comprehensive knowledge of food is required if contemporary problems within the food system are to be effectively addressed. To achieve this, the programme adopts an interdisciplinary approach to studying food only upheld by a small number of other academic institutions. It is the first of its kind in the UK, responding most closely to the specific cultural and political dynamics of Scotland’s food culture.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

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Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Constance Elizabeth Kampf, Charlotte J. Brandt and Christopher G. Kampf

The purpose is to explore how the process of action research (AR) can support building legitimacy and organizational learning in innovation project management and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to explore how the process of action research (AR) can support building legitimacy and organizational learning in innovation project management and portfolio practices in merger contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Meta-reflection on method issues in Action Research through an action research case study with an innovation group during an organizational change process. This case demonstrates an example of an action research cycle focused on building practitioner legitimacy rather than problem-solving.

Findings

Key findings include (1) demonstrating how AR can be used for building legitimacy through visualizing the innovation process, and embedding those visuals in top management practices of the organization; and (2) demonstrating how AR can work as an organizational learning tool in merger contexts.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on an action research cooperation during a two-and-a-half-year period. Thus, findings offer the depth of a medium term case study. The processes of building legitimacy represent this particular case, and can be investigated in other organizational contexts to see the extent to which these issues can be generalized.

Practical implications

For researchers, this paper offers an additional type of AR cycle to consider in their research design which can be seen as demonstrating a form of interplay between practitioner action and organizational level legitimacy. For practitioners, this paper demonstrates a connection between legitimacy and organizational learning in innovation contexts. The discussion of how visuals were co-created and used for building legitimacy for an innovation process that differs from the standard stage gate model demonstrates how engaging in AR research can contribute to developing visuals as resources for building legitimacy and organizational learning based on connections between theory and practice.

Originality/value

This case rethinks AR practice for innovation project management contexts to include legitimacy and organizational learning. This focus on legitimacy building from organizational learning and knowledge conversion contributes to our understanding of the soft side of innovation project management. Legitimacy is demonstrated to be a key concern for innovation project management practices.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Charlotte Carey

This chapter explores the role of entrepreneurship within the careers of fine artists. This is positioned within the context of the discourse of cultural value. How…

Abstract

This chapter explores the role of entrepreneurship within the careers of fine artists. This is positioned within the context of the discourse of cultural value. How artists manage their artistic and, sometimes conflicting, entrepreneurial identities is explored. The fields of entrepreneurship, and more recently the creative industries, have received much attention from both policy makers and researchers. Fine artists are perhaps one of the least employable, and arguably most entrepreneurial (by necessity), as Higgs et al. suggest ‘some occupations naturally have substantially higher numbers of self-employed people such as “Artists” with 91% self-employment’ (Higgs, Cunningham, & Bakhshi, 2008, p. 94).

The study captures the career histories of a cohort of fine art graduates, all of whom had graduated at the same time (1994), from the same institution. Taking a narrative approach, detailed career stories were obtained. The relationship to and tensions surrounding entrepreneurship and artistic practice were explored in detail. While artistic identity emerges as a strong force for this group, artistic identity and entrepreneurial identity are sometimes at odds with each other. The practicalities of making a living as an artist, arguably, call for entrepreneurial activity. However, the findings suggest that this presents a conflict for some artists, both aesthetically and emotionally. This chapter explores what this means in the context of cultural value, and cultural value as a ‘lens’ for understanding an artist's career.

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Charlotte Reedtz, Monica Martinussen, Fredrik Wang Jørgensen, Bjørn Helge Handegård and Willy‐Tore Mørch

The main aim of this study is to explore characteristics of parents who signed up for parenting classes offered to the universal population and their reasons for participation.

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to explore characteristics of parents who signed up for parenting classes offered to the universal population and their reasons for participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from parents in a study on parent training for children aged two to eight years (n=189), and a follow up survey on these parents (n=118).

Findings

Parents had high education, were married, and employed in full time jobs. The mean age of the children was under four years, and their Intensity and Problem scores on ECBI were higher than the Norwegian mean scores for their age group. Parent stress, parental concern, and parenting practices predicted the ECBI Intensity scores to a rather large extent.

Practical implications

Parents with high SES risk factors may not come forward to participate in face‐to‐face mental health promotion interventions even if the parenting intervention is offered in a non‐stigmatising way.

Originality/value

By offering a universal health promoting and preventive parent training service in the community, a large proportion of children with behaviour problems were identified and referred to treatment. This demonstrates how parent training services, offered to the universal population, may contribute to increase the reach for the youngest children in need of treatment.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Denise Burns, Martin Brown, Joe O’Hara and Gerry McNamara

The chapter establishes the rationale for the development of an online professional development course in designing culturally responsive assessment for faculty of the…

Abstract

The chapter establishes the rationale for the development of an online professional development course in designing culturally responsive assessment for faculty of the Institute of Education in Dublin City University. As the literature on which the course is based is from several countries, the course may be considered relevant for faculty in various countries and can be accessed as the course is online. The course of about 3.5 hours in duration begins with a definition of culturally responsive assessment before emphasizing the desirability of culturally responsive assessment based mainly on the obligation to design tests that are fair to all test takers. Key elements of the program are the concepts of multicultural validity, construct validity, language issues, dimensions of cultural difference impacting on learning and assessment, and the lecturer/supervisor as researcher of their own students as well as of their own enculturation. The focus is on the implications of these concepts for professional practice. The course synthesizes several sources to posit eight criteria for the preparation, process, and outcomes of culturally responsive assessment before presenting several assessment modes that have potential to be culturally fair. Finally, the course provides the opportunity for participants to design culturally responsive assessment in their own disciplines and then requests the participants to evaluate their designs in light of the criteria. Twelve respondents to a pilot study were essentially very positive about the value of the online course.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1966

Mary G. Brown

I ALL READERS TALK ABOUT BOOKS but how many stop to consider how books talk about them? The choice of a book is a very personal matter and inevitably tells something of…

Abstract

I ALL READERS TALK ABOUT BOOKS but how many stop to consider how books talk about them? The choice of a book is a very personal matter and inevitably tells something of the mind, the interests and the character of the reader. This applies not so much to books selected from a public library where readers are encouraged to be adventurous in their reading and to try a wide variety of books, but it does apply to those books which we buy and keep as our chosen friends and companions.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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