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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

John Burns, Charlotte Aspinall and Chris Matthews

Individuals with learning disabilities (LD) who offend are more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who do not. There is strong evidence to suggest that…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with learning disabilities (LD) who offend are more likely to be dependent on alcohol than those who do not. There is strong evidence to suggest that interventions for alcohol problems can be effective; this paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The pre and post assessment scores from an alcohol awareness group (AAG) were collected from 34 service users with LD or a dual diagnosis of LD and mental health problems. The programme was manual led and included 12 sessions. The data collected were used to evaluate the programme.

Findings

Clients' level of knowledge and self efficacy increased after programme completion. Post group, those with a lower IQ had gained a greater level of alcohol‐related knowledge compared to those with a higher IQ. Clients with a learning disability alone scored slightly higher than those with a dual diagnosis.

Originality/value

The AAG has been successful in increasing motivation to change drinking behaviour, knowledge of problems related to alcohol, and “safe drinking” practice. These outcomes have been achieved across a wide range of cognitive abilities suggesting that those with an IQ below 60 can also benefit from this type of intervention.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Colin Dale

Abstract

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Brendan P. Carmody

Abstract

Details

The Emergence of Teacher Education in Zambia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-560-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Jon S.T. Quah

The purpose of this paper is to explain why police corruption is rampant in Indonesia by analysing its perceived extent, causes and anti-corruption measures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain why police corruption is rampant in Indonesia by analysing its perceived extent, causes and anti-corruption measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on primary and secondary sources and survey data to analyse the perceived extent and causes of police corruption in Indonesia.

Findings

Police corruption is widespread in Indonesia because of the inadequate budget allocated to the police, police officers are paid low salaries and recruited and promoted on their ability to pay bribes instead of merit, corrupt police officers are not detected or punished and corrupt behaviour is tolerated by many Indonesians. Consequently, policy makers in Indonesia can only minimise police corruption if they have the political will and capacity to introduce appropriate reforms to address its five causes.

Originality/value

This paper will be useful to those scholars, policy makers and anti-corruption practitioners who are interested in learning about the extent and causes of police corruption in Indonesia and why efforts to curb it are ineffective.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Rob Roggema

With future (extreme) change ahead of us, there are many serious problems humankind has to face. The pace of mitigating climate change through an energy transition to…

Abstract

Purpose

With future (extreme) change ahead of us, there are many serious problems humankind has to face. The pace of mitigating climate change through an energy transition to renewables is slow, global mean temperature is increasing and sea level seems to rise at an accelerated pace. This puts many livelihoods at risk and communities have to face an uncertain future. Therefore, continuing the way contemporary cities are developing and developed is not an option. The new normal should also be reflected in urbanism. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the answer to this question is sought in understanding traditional attitudes to living and their relation to the land. How these cultures have been capable of coping with disruptions lies in the way their mental paradigm respects their environment. A more resilient future can be achieved when the traditional values of the relation of societies with the land they live on are considered important and indigenous knowledge and perspectives are used to design cities.

Findings

Current society seems to have forgotten what it means and how to put into practice sharing resources and space, giving back more to the environment than used to live. Also, mankind seems to be lacking the ability to move and search for the potentials where to live. Furthermore, choosing to live in safe places, hence being less vulnerable for disruptions, is a principle that has long been neglected. These characteristics of traditional cultures are translated in four principles that are valuable in design processes: first, making use of the energy and power a disaster might bring and turning it into an advantage; second, using imagination to anticipate an unknown future; third, accommodating all paces of urban change; and fourth, designing redundancy for flexibility. The use of these principles is illustrated in three Sydney-based examples.

Originality/value

The link between indigenous knowledge and current urban design practice is new.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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