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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Charlotta Windahl, Ingo O. Karpen and Mark R. Wright

This paper aims to conceptualise the interplay of strategic design and market-shaping capabilities.

1089

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptualise the interplay of strategic design and market-shaping capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the emergent scholarly discourses related to strategic design and dynamic markets, this paper merges a contemporary view of markets and market-shaping capabilities with a conceptual exploration of strategic design.

Findings

This paper proposes that the strategic design process can shape markets through orchestrating and leveraging market-shaping capabilities. Specifically, it highlights how these capabilities trigger and facilitate purposeful intent; situated and systemic understanding; and collective collaboration.

Practical implications

Furthering the notion of strategic design, this paper contributes to clarifying how to interpret and use design as a strategic practice in business management.

Originality/value

This paper identifies strategic design as an innovative approach for creating future value-creating systems or markets, and as such, it develops a process framework for market-shaping capabilities, addressing the “how” of market shaping.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Valtteri Kaartemo, Suvi Nenonen and Charlotta Windahl

This study aims to identify institutional work mechanisms that public actors employ in market shaping.

2203

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify institutional work mechanisms that public actors employ in market shaping.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an abductive theorizing process, combining a literature review with an empirical exploration of three different market-shaping contexts.

Findings

The study identifies 20 granular mechanisms of institutional work that market-shaping public actors employ. These mechanisms are all potentially employable in creating, maintaining or disrupting markets. Institutional work vis-à-vis individual institutions may differ in direction from the institutional work vis-à-vis the market system. Public actors are not a homogeneous group but may have different values and support competing institutional logics even when operating in the same market.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical data were limited to three cases in three small open economies. Data collected from other markets and with other methods would provide more rigorous insight into market-shaping public actors.

Practical implications

The findings revealed institutional work mechanisms that public actors can use to shape markets. Companies wanting to engage public actors in market shaping should be aware of the values and institutional logics that influence market-shaping public actors.

Originality/value

The paper unites and expands on the scattered knowledge regarding institutional work in market shaping. It illuminates and dissects the role of public actors in market shaping, challenging the reactive stance that is often assigned to them. The study provides a better understanding of how conflicting market views affect markets. It also brings insights into the interplay between market-shaping actions and the multiple levels of market systems.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Charlotta Windahl

This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the innovation challenges firms face when developing and commercialising solutions in the capital goods sector; challenges…

2586

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the innovation challenges firms face when developing and commercialising solutions in the capital goods sector; challenges related to the interdependencies between the supplier/innovator and the customers, as well as the solution’s impact on their competencies and activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon the emerging body of literature on solutions and established frameworks within innovation management literature. It explores a real-time longitudinal case study of “Alpha” (an international specialist in centrifugal separation, heat exchange and fluid handling), including an R&D project, the project’s transformation into an internal corporate venture and the years of the venture up until its integration into the corporate.

Findings

This paper characterises solutions as involving product and business innovation. By clarifying the differences between how the solution affects the customers and the suppliers, the use of the proposed framework develops a deeper understanding of the obstacles and difficulties involved in solution innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Although some customers were interviewed in this study, a more in-depth study of the customers and the actors within the business network would provide further insight into solution innovations. Merging the two discussions on co-creation and role of users in innovation could provide an avenue for fruitful research within this area.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework for deconstructing solution innovation, enabling detailed comparison between the innovation’s impact on both suppliers’ and customer’s competencies. Such a tool is helpful for increased understanding of how to facilitate internal and external acceptance for a disruptive and radical business innovation.

Originality/value

This paper links the development and commercialisation of solutions with established innovation frameworks. Understanding solutions as technology-driven business innovations provides a multifaceted and complex perspective on solutions and contributes to better understanding of radical business innovations.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Charlotta Windahl, Pierre Andersson, Christian Berggren and Camilla Nehler

For an increasing number of firms in the capital goods industry, combinations of products and services, so called integrated solutions, are becoming part of their future growth…

4266

Abstract

For an increasing number of firms in the capital goods industry, combinations of products and services, so called integrated solutions, are becoming part of their future growth strategies. By analysing three case studies, the article highlights the variety of such solutions and some important implications for the involved companies. The analysis suggests that companies need an extended set of competences to succeed in providing integrated solutions, amounting to a balance of technical and integration competence with market/business, consulting and partnering competences. This implies a move from product‐focus to customer‐centric orientation and focus on optimisation of user processes. From a research perspective the paper underlines the importance of integrating studies of product and service innovation, two fields that so far have been studied separately.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Chiara Cantù, Daniela Corsaro and Annalisa Tunisini

803

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Kristina Heinonen, Maria Holmlund and Tore Strandvik

596

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Suvi Nenonen and Kaj Storbacka

Abstract

Details

Smash
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-798-2

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