Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Charles Hanu, Hayford Amegbe, Monica Dede Tekyi Ansah Yawson and Philip Mensah

This study aims to examine the moderating effect of supportive organisational culture (SOC) on the differential impact of work-based learning (WBL) on employee agility…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the moderating effect of supportive organisational culture (SOC) on the differential impact of work-based learning (WBL) on employee agility, ambidexterity and proactive goal generation.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted using an online structured questionnaire with 443 respondents in Ghana. The data set was analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The outcomes of the study show that WBL has a significant and positive impact on employee agility, ambidexterity and proactive goal generation. However, the effect on employee agility was higher, followed by proactive goal generation and employee ambidexterity. The moderating effect of SOC on H1, H3a and H3b was found to have a decreasing effect.

Originality/value

This study augments knowledge by examining how different approaches to WBL collectively affect proactive goal generation, agility and ambidexterity. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to examine the differential impact of summative WBL approaches on employee outcomes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Hayford Amegbe, Michael D. Dzandu and Charles Hanu

The lovemarks theory (love and respect) is fairly new to the marketing literature and is now gaining much attention among marketing scholars. The study examined how brand…

1103

Abstract

Purpose

The lovemarks theory (love and respect) is fairly new to the marketing literature and is now gaining much attention among marketing scholars. The study examined how brand love and brand respect moderate the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR), trust (TRUS), satisfaction (SAT) and loyalty (LOY) among bank customers in an emerging/and or a developing country's context.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey approach was used. Data from a total of 769 banking customers, containing demographic and psychographic measures were used.

Findings

This study tested six (6) hypotheses. The results confirmed the moderating role of brand respect on the relationship between CSR and TRUS in the banking sector. Also, our results reveal that BLOV moderates the relationship between SAT and LOY. The rest of our hypotheses did not confirm any significant relationship between them.

Research limitations/implications

Like any academic exercise, this study also has some limitations. The hypotheses tested for brand love on bank customers' perceptions of CSR were based on a country study. The implication of brand love for CSR may be the same or vary in different country contexts.

Practical implications

The study provides managers of banks and managers of financial institutions a better understanding of how love and respect could play a role in their loyalty program and how to incorporate these new constructs into the already known constructs such as satisfaction, trust and loyalty.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it quantitatively examined the relationships between well-researched constructs corporate social responsibility (CSR), trust (TRUS), satisfaction (SAT) on loyalty (LOY) as well as examining these constructs with a fairly new constructs brand love (BLOV) and respect (BRES) in a single study.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Hayford Amegbe, Charles Hanu and Farouq Mensah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of employees’ behavioural factors in increasing students’ loyalty. It specifically examines the direct and indirect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of employees’ behavioural factors in increasing students’ loyalty. It specifically examines the direct and indirect mediations between employees’ service quality, trust and intimacy. The focus is on the effects of constructs of service quality (SQLTY), trust (TRUS) and intimacy (INTIMACY) on student loyalty (STLOY).

Design/methodology/approach

This study depended on a positivist research paradigm. A total of 800 structured questionnaires were administered. However, 743 were retrieved and coded for the final analysis. The analytical tool used in this study is the ADANCO 2.0.1 software and in terms of statistical processing, the PLS–SEM technique was utilised.

Findings

The findings on direct relationships reveal that INTIMACY is a strong predictor of STLOY, whereas service quality (SQLTY) is a predictor of trust (TRUS). The effect of indirect mediation between service quality (SQLTY), trust (TRUS) and intimacy (INTIMACY) on STLOY was not confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The study like any academic work has limitations. Despite these limitations, this study offers theoretical as well as practical value for the research community and administrators of universities and higher educational administrators as a whole.

Practical implications

The study emphasises the critical need for administrators of higher educational institutions to understand that the behaviours of their employees during the service encounter significantly affect intimacy and student loyalty.

Originality/value

The present study is unique because it quantitatively examined how the above-mentioned behavioural factors of employees lead to INTIMACY and STLOY. The use of a university for the research helped to develop a much better explanation of some of the salient considerations for STLOY. The value of this work rests in the complex quantitative relationships studied.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3