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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Hector R. Flores, Xueting Jiang and Charles C. Manz

The aim of this paper is to present a model of the moderating role of emotional self-leadership on the cognitive conflict–affective conflict relationship and their effect…

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1843

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a model of the moderating role of emotional self-leadership on the cognitive conflict–affective conflict relationship and their effect on work team decision quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon extant theoretical and empirical research on the conflict, leadership and emotions literature works to argue for the role of emotional self-leadership as a boundary condition of the intra-team conflict–work team decision quality relationship.

Findings

Key to understanding why cognitive conflict sometimes leads to improved decision quality and sometimes it does not is the role of emotional self-leadership. Through emotional self-leadership, team members can actively anticipate, guide and focus their emotional responses to cognitive conflict and reduce their experience of affective conflict, improving team decision quality.

Research limitations/implications

Identifying and explaining the moderating role of emotional self-leadership represents important progress for reframing emotion regulation and emotional intelligence into a new theoretical lens that may yield more meaningful insights into self-managed teams’ research. If empirically supported, this moderating effect would help explain the contradictory results obtained in prior empirical studies.

Practical implications

Practitioners can diminish or avoid the negative effect of the type of conflict that lowers work team decision quality and preserve the positive effect of the type of conflict that improves work team decision quality by identifying and implementing ways to improve a work team’s level of collective emotional self-leadership.

Originality/value

This paper extends the emotions, leadership and conflict literature works into the current research on self-directed work teams’ effectiveness by bringing attention to the moderating role of emotional self-leadership and calls for empirical research on this subject.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Jeffery D. Houghton, Christopher P. Neck and Charles C. Manz

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a…

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2814

Abstract

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a scarcity of writings has focused on the issue of work team sustainability. The dictionary defines “sustain” as “to prevent from falling, collapsing, or giving way,” and “to endure.” This definition gives rise to the following question: “What are the factors that contribute to those work teams that ‘endure’ and that do not ‘fall, collapse, or give way’ during challenging organizational experiences?” In this paper, we will take an initial step toward answering this question by presenting a cognitive model of work team sustainability based upon established cognitive principles of individual‐level effort and performance sustainability. This model is designed to provide some practical insights into the long‐term team performance sustainability issue while also serving as a possible foundation for future research efforts.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Christopher P. Neck, Heidi M. Neck, Charles C. Manz and Jeffrey Godwin

The concept of “Thought Self‐Leadership” involves individual self‐influence through cognitive strategies that focus on self‐dialogue, mental imagery, beliefs and…

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7228

Abstract

The concept of “Thought Self‐Leadership” involves individual self‐influence through cognitive strategies that focus on self‐dialogue, mental imagery, beliefs and assumptions, and thought patterns. A plethora of studies from various fields including management, counseling psychology, sports psychology, education, and communication, address the effect of these Thought Self‐Leadership cognitive strategies on cognitions and behaviors. This research provides consistent support for the relationship between constructive self‐leadership of these cognitive processes and enhanced performance. The application of these cognitive strategies to the entrepreneurship domain, however, is sparse. We propose that the application of these principles to the entrepreneurial process offers the potential to enhance individual performance and mental states for both practicing and aspiring entrepreneurs. Propositions derived from the proposed framework are developed to serve as catalysts for empirically testing the applicability of Thought Self‐Leadership to the entrepreneurship context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949510075155. When citing…

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4383

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949510075155. When citing the article, please cite: Charles C. Manz, Christopher P. Neck, (1995), “Teamthink: beyond the groupthink syndrome in self-managing work teams”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 10 Iss: 1, pp. 7 - 15.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Pamala J. Dillon and Charles C. Manz

We develop a multilevel model of emotional processes grounded in social identity theory to explore the role of emotion in transformational leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

We develop a multilevel model of emotional processes grounded in social identity theory to explore the role of emotion in transformational leadership.

Methodology/approach

This work is conceptual in nature and develops theory surrounding emotion in organizations by integrating theories on transformational leadership, emotion management, and organizational identity.

Findings

Transformational leaders utilize interpersonal emotion management strategies to influence and respond to emotions arising from the self-evaluative processes of organizational members during times of organizational identity change.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model detailed provides insight on the intersubjective emotional processes grounded in social identity that influence transformational leadership. Future research into transformational leadership behaviors will benefit from a multilevel perspective which includes both interpersonal emotion management and intrapersonal emotion generation related to social identity at both the within-person and between-person levels.

Originality/value

The proposed model expands on the role of emotions in transformational leadership by theoretically linking the specific transformational behaviors to discrete emotions displayed by followers. While previous empirical research has indicated the positive outcomes of transformational leadership and the role of emotion recognition, work has yet to be presented which explicates the role of discrete emotions in the transformational leadership process.

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Craig L. Pearce, Charles C. Manz and Samuel Akanno

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the linkage between leadership and sustainability. Recent scandals involving executive leadership have significantly…

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2079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the linkage between leadership and sustainability. Recent scandals involving executive leadership have significantly contributed to the topic of sustainability becoming one of the most important concerns of the management literature in the twenty‐first century.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ approach is to review the extant literature and develop a theoretical model of the connection between leadership, in its many forms, and sustainability.

Findings

Most treatments of sustainability have focused on glorifying top executives for their sustainability efforts or vilifying them for their lack thereof. The authors claim that this perspective is oversimplified and flawed.

Research limitations/implications

The authors develop several readily testable propositions to guide future research.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the authors’ model are focused on the engagement of employees at work: the philosophical perspective espoused in the model is one founded on empowerment and active involvement.

Social implications

The model purports mechanisms through which organizations can develop more robust systems that ultimately can translate into more sustainable organizational practices.

Originality/value

The presented model is original in that the authors propose that broadening management development across all levels of organizations, along the lines of shared leadership theory, will facilitate organizational sustainability.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Christopher P. Neck and Charles C. Manz

Proposes a new sort of learning process ‐ power‐point learning ‐ that goes beyond the traditional “teaching”. It involves a learning process that aims at satisfying the…

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1112

Abstract

Proposes a new sort of learning process ‐ power‐point learning ‐ that goes beyond the traditional “teaching”. It involves a learning process that aims at satisfying the primary needs of the most important customers involved ‐ the learners. Suggests that one effective method of fulfilling these student needs is through a SuperLeadership approach.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Christopher P. Neck, T.L. Mitchell, Charles C. Manz, Kenneth H. Cooper and Emmet C. Thompson

This article describes the importance of fitness (chiefly exercise) for top ranking executive leaders and for their respective organizations. The authors discuss how…

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1756

Abstract

This article describes the importance of fitness (chiefly exercise) for top ranking executive leaders and for their respective organizations. The authors discuss how fitness can contribute to stamina, mental clarity, ability to cope with stress and a variety of other factors that can affect an executive’s ability to lead. The authors support this premise by drawing on key research studies and actual accounts of top executives from a variety of business organizations. The authors feature information obtained from direct interviews with the year 2000 USA presidential candidates, Al Gore and George W. Bush. The authors view them as high profile models of how fitness can be given high priority for maintaining personal effectiveness for even the busiest executive leaders.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

José C. Alves, Kathi J. Lovelace, Charles C. Manz, Dmytro Matsypura, Fuminori Toyasaki and Ke (Grace) Ke

Seeks to understand how differences in national cultures impact on the understanding and meaning of the concept of self‐leadership and its application.

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11204

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to understand how differences in national cultures impact on the understanding and meaning of the concept of self‐leadership and its application.

Design/methodology/approach

First, research at the intersection of culture and leadership and Hofstede's culture framework are reviewed. Then the main components of self‐leadership theory are introduced, and how Hofstede's framework can be used to re‐analyze them given differences across cultures is discussed.

Findings

While self‐leadership remains, in general, a valid concept, its understanding and application is likely to differ across cultures. Specifically, high power distance raises the importance of the symbolic value of tasks and correspondent covert processes of self‐leadership, high uncertainty avoidance makes more explicit the importance of non‐rational and intuition‐based thought processes, collectivism shows the relevance of social relations, femininity reiterates the importance of social relations and non‐rational processes, and long‐term orientation introduces the importance of making time an explicit element.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further research on self‐leadership that investigates the roles of social and cultural relations, communication and language, multilevel interdependencies, and ethics. Empirically there is need for developing a self‐leadership instrument that is relevant and applicable across cultures.

Practical implications

This paper should facilitate appreciation of a contingency perspective of self‐leadership that requires different modes of application across cultures.

Originality/value

This paper helps fill a gap in the self‐leadership literature. In particular, it can facilitate greater understanding of this concept in cultures other than the USA, where it originated.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Xueting Jiang, Hector R. Flores, Ronrapee Leelawong and Charles C. Manz

Based on extant literature on empowerment and team management, this paper aims to examine the effect of power distance and collectivism on the relationship between…

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5902

Abstract

Purpose

Based on extant literature on empowerment and team management, this paper aims to examine the effect of power distance and collectivism on the relationship between empowerment and team performance through the mechanisms of knowledge sharing and intra-group conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualizes a model depicting the relationship between team empowerment and team performance across cultures.

Findings

The authors argue that team empowerment can increase both knowledge sharing and intra-group conflict in working teams. Knowledge sharing facilitates team performance, while intra-group conflict impairs team performance in the long run. Team empowerment yields different team performance across cultures due to the respective moderating effects of power distance and collectivism.

Originality/value

This paper explicates the moderating roles of power distance and collectivism on the relationship between empowerment, knowledge sharing, intra-group conflict and team performance. The authors suggest that the effectiveness of team empowerment is contingent on the cultural context that the team operates in.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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