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Article

Cara Peters and Charles D. Bodkin

The purpose of the study was to examine the potential outcomes of consumers' intention to engage retail store community. The research question focused on: what impact will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to examine the potential outcomes of consumers' intention to engage retail store community. The research question focused on: what impact will intention to engage retail store community have on store satisfaction, store commitment, shopping enjoyment and store employee trust?

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a national panel of 232 adult consumers in the USA. The theoretical model and hypotheses were tested using path analysis in AMOS.

Findings

The model was supported. Intention to engage retail store community had a significant impact on store employee trust, shopping enjoyment, store satisfaction and store commitment. In addition, store employee trust and store satisfaction had a significant impact on store commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study identified a breadth of outcomes that result from an intention to engage with retail store community. Furthermore, the study is limited to a grocery shopping retail store context and only outcomes are identified.

Practical implications

Managerially, retailers want to find innovative ways to compete in the marketplace, and the findings of this study highlight the benefits that can accrue to retailers who want to pursue a community strategy.

Originality/value

Few papers have examined retail store brand communities, and none has identified the outcomes of intention to engage with retail store community.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Charles D. Bodkin, Cara Peters and Jane Thomas

Company stores market to their internal employees via the distribution of branded promotional products. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that may…

Abstract

Purpose

Company stores market to their internal employees via the distribution of branded promotional products. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that may influence when an employee is more likely to purchase from a company store.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to the members of a chamber of commerce located in the southeastern USA. Data were analyzed using regression, and post hoc analyses were conducted using an analysis of covariance.

Findings

Organizational identification and job satisfaction significantly impacted employees’ intentions to purchase from a company store. Gender, education, marital status and years of work experience were personal factors that moderated that relationship. Firm size and employee rank were company factors that moderated the relationship between employee work perceptions and employee purchase intentions at a company store.

Originality/value

No research to date exists on company stores. This study is unique in that it proposes internal branding as a theoretical foundation for understanding company stores and examines factors that impact employees’ intentions to purchase from a company store.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Monica Perry and Charles Bodkin

Discusses the results of content analysis of the Web sites of Fortune 100 companies, carried out to identify the mix of promotional activities on their Web sites…

Abstract

Discusses the results of content analysis of the Web sites of Fortune 100 companies, carried out to identify the mix of promotional activities on their Web sites. Specifically, we performed a content analysis of Web sites utilizing categories representing a range of marketing communications, including: communicating product, pricing and dealer/retail location information, related and unrelated advertisements, sales promotion, direct marketing, basic company information and public relations. We also identified differences between and among industries based on standard industrial classification (SIC) codes. We found considerable variability in how members of the Fortune 100 used their Web sites. The Web sites ranged from very simple ones that focused on basic company information, such as company history, to quite complex Web sites that incorporated a mix of promotional elements, such as press releases, advertisements, games, free gifts and pricing information.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article

Charles Bodkin and George Miaoulis

Marketers and health care providers alike have been actively using the internet to provide information and market a wide variety of health care services and products. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers and health care providers alike have been actively using the internet to provide information and market a wide variety of health care services and products. This study aims to address consumer's perceptions regarding the quality and ethics of eHealth care web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a national random sample of 1,227 respondents, this study identifies online health care information seekers and explores the type of information they seek, their perceptions of eHealth web site quality and ethics, and eHealth care purchases.

Findings

The results indicate that while WebMD currently dominates the eHealth care market, the future for niche eHealth care web sites appears promising as consumers' perceptions of eHealth care web site quality and ethical behaviors improve.

Practical implications

Using quality dimensions identified by trade associations, it appears consumers believe useful and accurate healthcare information can be found online, which suggests the potential for developing a trusting relationship. In addition, it appears the development of ethical codes for eHealth web sites is having an affect on consumers' perceptions.

Originality/value

Healthcare information is now available online 24 hours a day and, approximately, 63 percent of physicians use the internet in their practice. But, how do consumers seek health information online? And do consumers perceive these online web sites to be ethical? The current study is unique in its focus on examining eHealth code of ethics using guidelines from several prominent online eHealth ethics organizations.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Article

Charles D. Bodkin, Louis H. Amato and Christie H. Amato

The purpose of this paper is to explore influences of green advertising and social activism during one of the worst adverse public relations episodes in history: the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore influences of green advertising and social activism during one of the worst adverse public relations episodes in history: the British Petroleum (BP) Deep Water Horizon oil spill.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses self-congruency theory and perception of fit to explore the influence of green advertising and social activism on attitudes toward BP’s advertising, commitment to the environment, brand, and company. The survey data cover periods before, during, and after the spill.

Findings

Mean ratings for the BP brand were lower during the oil spill for respondents who viewed an environmental ad as compared to those viewing an ad lacking environmental content. Comparison of attitudes toward BP’s environmental commitment, advertising, company, and brand reveal differences between activist and non-activist respondents across all four attitudinal scales during the oil spill.

Practical implications

The study finds that lack of fit between corporate social responsibility communications and social responsibility performance raises the potential for a significant backlash against BP.

Originality/value

The paper utilizes unique data that include survey responses before during and after the BP Deep Water Horizon oil spill. Empirical analyses of attitudes toward advertising, company, and brand over the life cycle of an adverse public relations event are among the first of their kind. Similarly, analyses of differences in activist and non-activist attitudes toward a company operating in a high-environmental risk industry are also among the first ever.

Content available
Article

Avinandan Mukherjee

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article

Casey L. Donoho, Michael J. Polonsky, Scott Roberts and David A. Cohen

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core…

Abstract

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core relationships of the general theory of marketing ethics were successfully replicated using over 1,500 students from seven universities in the USA, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia. States that tomorrow’s managers appeared to use a more deontological approach to making ethical judgements about personal selling. Extends its original research by confirming the positive relationship between the probability and the desirability of consequences. Concludes that, although the model was originally intended to explain management ethical decision making, the study shows that it may be possible to generalize as to how individuals make ethical life decisions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

President, Charles S. Goldman, M.P.; Chairman, Charles Bathurst, M.P.; Vice‐Presidents: Christopher Addison, M.D., M.P., Waldorf Astor, M.P., Charles Bathurst, M.P.…

Abstract

President, Charles S. Goldman, M.P.; Chairman, Charles Bathurst, M.P.; Vice‐Presidents: Christopher Addison, M.D., M.P., Waldorf Astor, M.P., Charles Bathurst, M.P., Hilaire Belloc, Ralph D. Blumenfeld, Lord Blyth, J.P., Colonel Charles E. Cassal, V.D., F.I.C., the Bishop of Chichester, Sir Arthur H. Church, K.C.V.O., M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S., Sir Wm. Earnshaw Cooper, C.I.E., E. Crawshay‐Williams, M.P., Sir Anderson Critchett, Bart., C.V.O., F.R.C.S.E., William Ewart, M.D., F.R.C.P., Lieut.‐Colonel Sir Joseph Fayrer, Bart., M.A., M.D., Sir Alfred D. Fripp, K.C.V.O., C.B., M.B., M.S., Sir Harold Harmsworth, Bart., Arnold F. Hills, Sir Victor Horsley, M.D., F.R.C.S., F.R.S., O. Gutekunst, Sir H. Seymour King, K.C.I.E., M.A., the Duke of Manchester, P.C., Professor Sir Wm. Osler, Bart., M.D., F.R.S., Sir Gilbert Parker, D.C.L., M.P., Sir Wm. Ramsay, K.C.B., LL.D., M.D., F.R.S., Harrington Sainsbury, M.D., F.R.C.P., W. G. Savage, M.D., B.Sc., R. H. Scanes Spicer, M.D., M.R.C.S., the Hon. Lionel Walrond, M.P., Hugh Walsham, M.D., F.R.C.P., Harvey W. Wiley, M.D., Evelyn Wrench.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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