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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Charles Blankson, Seth Ketron and Joseph Darmoe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employment of positioning strategies in the retail bank sector of Sub-Saharan Africa, specifically using Ghana as the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employment of positioning strategies in the retail bank sector of Sub-Saharan Africa, specifically using Ghana as the study context. In addition, it explores the applicability of western-based typology of positioning strategies in the Sub-Saharan African environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Six retail banks – three national and three foreign – are studied, each through an in-depth case study method: covert and participant observation techniques; and face-to-face interviews of chief executive officers, marketing managers, and bank branch managers provided data for the study.

Findings

The results show that the “service” positioning strategy is the most popular strategy employed by retail banks. “Value for money,” “attractiveness,” “brand name,” and “country of origin” positioning strategies are also dominant. “Top of the range” and “selectivity” strategies are minimally pursued by the sample of banks studied. The results reveal that both foreign and national retail banks employ multiple positioning strategies in the face of competition. However, foreign retail banks consistently employ a; large number of strategies relative to national retail banks. This paper supports the applicability of a western-derived set of positioning strategies in the Sub-Saharan African marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

This study closes a gap in the understanding of positioning, as well as filling the empirical gap in the application of positioning. In addition, it helps resolve a contextual gap of knowledge in Sub-Saharan Africa’s retail banking sector.

Originality/value

This study responds to Porter (1996), Clancy and Trout (2002), and Knox (2004) for continued empirical research in positioning in service industries and specifically in Sub-Saharan African economies (Coffie, 2014, 2016; Coffie and Owusu-Frimpong, 2014). Moreover, this research adds value to the banking and marketing literatures through a qualitative case study method, which is an important yet overlooked research method (Yin, 2009).

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2018

Lu Xu, Victor Prybutok and Charles Blankson

This paper posits, develops and tests the effects of general environmental awareness factors on consumers’ intentions in the Environmental Awareness Purchasing Intention…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper posits, develops and tests the effects of general environmental awareness factors on consumers’ intentions in the Environmental Awareness Purchasing Intention Model. Environmental awareness is tested within the context of purchasing vehicles and, thus, vehicle relevant factors (perceived quality and self-image) are also included. Further, the purpose of this paper is to explain the relative contribution of general environmental awareness factors on purchasing intentions compared to quality and self-image.

Design/methodology/approach

The main thrust of the research involved a survey of 248 young automobile buyers from a large public university in Texas, USA. The data were analyzed using both multiple regression and partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

Environmental attitude has a positive impact on purchasing intention, while perceived control toward environmentally responsible behavior has a negative impact. Results also show a positive impact of quality and self-image on intention to purchase environmentally friendly cars. Furthermore, the results reveal that environmental awareness factors explain less variance than perceived quality. At the same time, the results show that environmental factors, relatively, explain more variance in the decision-making process than self-image.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationship between general environmental awareness and the intention to purchase an environmentally friendly car. This study contributes to sustainable consumption literature in operations management. The paper also provides insights for developing managerial guidelines for car manufacturers based on the understanding of factors influencing environmentally friendly car purchasing intentions.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Thuy D. Nguyen, Shih Yung Chou, Charles Blankson and Phillip Wilson

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach – both qualitative and quantitative – the study develops religious self-transformation and self-categorization scales to empirically evaluate the hypotheses.

Findings

The convergence of consumption, self-identification and religious attitudes and behaviors proffer an essentially subjective concept useful in understanding the existential reflection and supernatural orientation that individuals may seek through consumption. Cluster analysis (based on product, services, media and practices) reveals four quadrants. The non-religious (religious) group has low (high) consumption in all four consumption categories Self-categorization (self-transformation) group has high (low) level of product consumption, but low (high) in all three other categories. This research presented four invisible identities that are visibly different in terms of life satisfaction, religious brand preference, dollars spending on religious products and monetary donation.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers one medium-size city as opposed to all types of cities. All religious affiliated and nonaffiliated respondents are included in the total sample.

Practical implications

The study offers new insights into the triadic relationship between religious self-identification, religious consumption, and the marketplace that can be used in branding, segmentation, targeting, positioning, and persuasive advertising, public relation and social media, and services marketing.

Social implications

Religion addresses the nature of existence. In this religion–consumer–brand nexus, consumption is a way for consumers to experience and immense themselves in the sacred to solidify, communicate, transform, improve and transport who they are capitalizing on religious self-identification can affectively promote positive social change.

Originality/value

This work proposes four invisible identities that are different in consumption of religious products and services in terms of patterns and purposes. These groups of consumers shape the marketplace through the derived utility of their religious consumption based on their self-identification, which in turn influences their religious brand preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Kwabena G. Boakye, Hong Qin, Charles Blankson, Mark D. Hanna and Victor R. Prybutok

The purpose of this study is to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived provider professionalism and service recovery in enhancing patient satisfaction in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived provider professionalism and service recovery in enhancing patient satisfaction in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey method to investigate satisfaction among health-care consumers. This study used data collected from 210 health-care consumers to empirically test the hypotheses via structural equation modeling

Findings

This study found that service recovery has a significant direct effect on patient satisfaction. Though this study did not find perceived provider professionalism to have a direct effect on patient satisfaction, it found an indirect effect in the relationship via service experience. Thus, service experience fully/completely mediates the relationship between perceived provider professionalism and patient satisfaction, while partially mediating the significant relationship between service recovery and patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

The results further underscore the need for health-care organizations in developing countries to focus on mindfully developing operations-oriented strategies that lead to the delivery of memorable service experiences for patients.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Otto Afiuc, Samuel K. Bonsu, Franklyn Manu, Casey Brett Knight, Swati Panda and Charles Blankson

Using social exchange theory as a contextual backdrop, this study aims to better understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) can contribute to customer retention…

Abstract

Purpose

Using social exchange theory as a contextual backdrop, this study aims to better understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) can contribute to customer retention (CR). A conceptual framework is developed to illustrate the proposed relationship and the influence of mediating factors. The telecommunication industry in Ghana is used to operationalize the conceptual framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through face-to-face interviews with CSR managers and through a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed using qualitative analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings suggest that CSR, corporate image and service quality have significant relationships with both corporate image and CR. Corporate image also mediates the relationship between CSR, customer value and service quality with that of CR. The authors also find that CSR strengthens the relationship between customer value and service quality with that of corporate image, which subsequently leads to enhanced CR.

Originality/value

Thus far, the mediating variables that help explain and predict the relationship between CSR activities and CR have been overlooked in the extant literature. The results of this study will help fill a critical knowledge gap in marketing and CSR literature.

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Ernest Kafui Kwasi Tsetse, Mahmoud Abdulai Mahmoud, Charles Blankson and Raphael Odoom

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between stakeholder market orientation (StMO) and sustainability performance (SP) at tourism destinations (TDs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between stakeholder market orientation (StMO) and sustainability performance (SP) at tourism destinations (TDs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative survey, data was collected from 313 tourism business managers, who are the owners or managers of the tourism businesses at the TDs, and was analysed using the partial least square structural equation model.

Findings

Findings indicate that environmental performance is the highest sustainability management practice adhered to at the TDs. Also, community and visitor orientations predicted SP most, with all its hypotheses supported.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the impact of StMO dimensions on SP within the TDs, thereby limiting generalisation to other sectors.

Practical implications

Tourism marketing managers are given the knowledge that StMO strategy is a precondition for effective implementation and adoption of SP strategy.

Social implications

The results have key social implications, in that a sustainability marketing strategy that will assist in the increase acceptance of sustainability programs within the tourism sector has been noted.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is believed to be the first empirical study to test the relationship between StMO dimensions and three SP dimensions. This study will improve the sustainability management of tourism resources in Ghana. It will further aid in meeting some of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Kwabena G. Boakye, Charles Blankson, Victor R. Prybutok and Hong Qin

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a healthcare framework of service quality, perceived value, and satisfaction in Ghana. More specifically, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a healthcare framework of service quality, perceived value, and satisfaction in Ghana. More specifically, this study investigates the role and effect of service quality on patient satisfaction and perceived value in Ghana’s healthcare delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through surveys administered to 113 healthcare patients in Ghana. partial least square-structural equation modeling analysis was used to empirically test the research model.

Findings

Results show healthcare quality significantly influences satisfaction and perceived value of healthcare delivery. Additionally, perceived value’s impact on satisfaction and behavioral intention shows that increasing perceived benefits while reducing perceived costs leads to repeat behavior and paves the way for retention strategy for healthcare management.

Research limitations/implications

This study yields a series of limitations in its results and conclusions. These limitations and future research are discussed in Section 7 of the study.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by examining the effects of healthcare service quality on patient satisfaction and perceived value, determining the effect of healthcare service quality on patients’ behavioral intention, and testing the proposed framework in Ghana, a fast growing and economically liberalized emerging country in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2022

Chris I. Enyinda, Charles Blankson, Guangming Cao and Ifeoma E. Enyinda

Rising expectations for exceptional customer experiences demand strategic amalgamation of cross-functional, customer-focused teams (marketing/sales/service departments)…

Abstract

Purpose

Rising expectations for exceptional customer experiences demand strategic amalgamation of cross-functional, customer-focused teams (marketing/sales/service departments). However, the long history of interface conflicts between functional teams continues to attract research attention. Past research has given more attention to conflicts between marketing and sales teams than to triadic interface conflict between custom-focused teams and their sub-conflicts in a business-to-business (B2B) sales process. The purpose of this research paper is to quantify the triadic interface conflicts and associated sub-conflicts between customer-focused teams, discuss conflict resolution strategies and perform a sensitivity analysis (SA) to give a fuller account of functional team conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) based in the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is proposed for identifying and resolving conflicts in customer-focused team interfaces. A group of 30 managers of a large electronics company participated in this research. The authors collected the data from customer-focused team managers during training sessions on interface conflicts and conflict management/resolution strategies. The authors perform SA to test the robustness of conflict resolution strategy rankings.

Findings

The findings reveal that managers adjudge task as the most crucial conflict attribute driving teams apart, followed by lack of communication. For the sub-conflicts, managers considered how to do the task as the most important conflict attribute, followed by lack of regular meetings. For conflict resolution strategies, managers regarded collaboration or integration as the overall best strategy, followed by compromise. Leveraging the AHP-based MCDM to resolve customer-focused team interface conflicts provides managers with the confidence in the consistency and the robustness of these solutions. By testing the SA, it is also discovered that the final outcome stayed robust (stable) regardless when the priorities of the main criteria influencing the decision are increased and decreased by 5% in every combinations.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined only a large B2B company in the electronics industry in African and Middle East settings, focusing on interface conflicts among customer-focused departments. Future research could address these limitations.

Practical implications

This paper advances our understanding of customer-focused team interface conflicts in a B2B sales process. It also provides valuable insights on effective management of major and sub-interface conflicts. This paper provides a framework for and practical insights into how interface conflicts that are prevalent in marketing, sales and service sectors can be resolved to improve customer experience and business performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by developing an AHP-based MCDM, which not only extends our conceptual understanding of the interface conflicts between customer-focused teams by emphasizing their triadic nature but also provides valuable strategies and insights into the practical resolution of such conflicts in a B2B firm’s sales process. Methodologically, SA is valuable to ensuring the robustness of the conflict resolution strategies’ rankings that will influence relevant pragmatic decision-making.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Stavros P. Kalafatis, Charles Blankson, Marvyn Luxly Boatswain and Markos H. Tsogas

Grounded in regulatory mode theory (RMT), this study aims to investigate the impact of managers’ orientation for action (locomotion and assessment) in business-to-business…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in regulatory mode theory (RMT), this study aims to investigate the impact of managers’ orientation for action (locomotion and assessment) in business-to-business positioning decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected using a scenario-based experimental design. Study 1 examines whether interest and involvement in recommending a positioning strategy depends on a manager’s regulatory mode orientation. The impact of such orientations on the likelihood of changing a recommended positioning strategy is the focus of Study 2. The moderating effects of task motivation (expected rewards resulting from a recommendation), market feedback and the line manager’s leadership style are examined.

Findings

Both assessment and locomotion are significant determinants of involvement in recommending a positioning strategy. The introduction of motivation as a moderator helps explain differences in level of interest in positioning decision-making. Locomotion, but not assessment, affects the likelihood of changing a recommended positioning strategy. Assessment amplifies the impact of locomotion, while none of the interaction effects between regulatory mode orientation and contextual factors is a significant determinant of changing a positioning strategy.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first application of RMT on positioning decision-making. Results from two experiments provide novel insights into the predictive relevance of managers’ preference in terms of involvement with the decision-making process and the likelihood of altering positioning.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Roseline Barbara Easmon, Adelaide Naa Amerley Kastner, Charles Blankson and Mahmoud Abdulai Mahmoud

The purpose of this paper is to understand the direct impact of social capital and the influence of market-based capabilities as intervening variables on the export…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the direct impact of social capital and the influence of market-based capabilities as intervening variables on the export performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire-based survey was used to collect data from top executives and senior managers of exporting companies in Ghana. Data obtained were analysed using the structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings revealed that social capital of SMEs exert the greatest influence on their export performance. Innovation and marketing capabilities are also key drivers of export performance among SMEs as they fully mediate the social capital–export performance relationship. Notwithstanding, marketing capabilities appear to exert a greater influence than innovation capabilities on the export performance of SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The study used perceptual measures of international performance by managers of SMEs in the Ghanaian exporting sector making it difficult to determine respondent bias.

Practical implications

Managers of exporting firms should build stronger relationships with their customers and suppliers who contribute significantly to their export performance. SMEs would also have to hone their innovation and marketing skills as strategic components in enhancing their export performance.

Social implications

Market-based resources such as marketing and innovation should not be taken for granted by SMEs in the export business.

Originality/value

The study offers some lessons on how small firms can sharpen their marketing and innovation capabilities to derive export performance benefits from social capital. Theoretically, while the findings offer strong evidence reinforcing the DC theory, an exploration of the nexus of the theories brings to the fore the need to reassess the resource-based view and SC theories.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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