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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Charles Bermingham, Christopher F. Manlick and William Ming Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explain the history of the Fairweather Lodge Program, its utility, the development of one program in a small Midwestern city, the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the history of the Fairweather Lodge Program, its utility, the development of one program in a small Midwestern city, the role of psychology, and the importance of disseminating information about the program to combat homelessness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a short case study approach to describing the evolution of a peer support-based housing program for individuals with serious mental illness and a history of homelessness.

Findings

The Fairweather Lodge facilitates peer support, community engagement, stable housing, and work engagement in those struggling with mental illness and homelessness.

Originality/value

The Fairweather Lodge Program is a program intended to support the mental health and employment needs of individuals with severe mental illness who are at increased risk of homelessness. Housing alone often does not address the complex needs of chronically homeless individuals.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Yeslam Al-Saggaf and Amanda Davies

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design, application and findings of a case study in which the application of a machine learning algorithm is utilised to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design, application and findings of a case study in which the application of a machine learning algorithm is utilised to identify the grievances in Twitter in an Arabian context.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the characteristics of the Twitter users who expressed the identified grievances, data mining techniques and social network analysis were utilised. The study extracted a total of 23,363 tweets and these were stored as a data set. The machine learning algorithm applied to this data set was followed by utilising a data mining process to explore the characteristics of the Twitter feed users. The network of the users was mapped and the individual level of interactivity and network density were calculated.

Findings

The machine learning algorithm revealed 12 themes all of which were underpinned by the coalition of Arab countries blockade of Qatar. The data mining analysis revealed that the tweets could be clustered in three clusters, the main cluster included users with a large number of followers and friends but who did not mention other users in their tweets. The social network analysis revealed that whilst a large proportion of users engaged in direct messages with others, the network ties between them were not registered as strong.

Practical implications

Borum (2011) notes that invoking grievances is the first step in the radicalisation process. It is hoped that by understanding these grievances, the study will shed light on what radical groups could invoke to win the sympathy of aggrieved people.

Originality/value

In combination, the machine learning algorithm offered insights into the grievances expressed within the tweets in an Arabian context. The data mining and the social network analyses revealed the characteristics of the Twitter users highlighting identifying and managing early intervention of radicalisation.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Education Policy as a Roadmap for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-298-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Coral Westaway, Lizette Nolte and Rachel Brown

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of the issues facing those who experience multiple moves around homelessness projects. It considers these issues…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of the issues facing those who experience multiple moves around homelessness projects. It considers these issues and how they relate to best practice, informing the delivery of psychologically informed environments (PIEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative design was employed, with interviews undertaken with men currently residing in hostels for those with additional needs. These men had already experienced multiple moves within the hostel system. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Main themes consider issues and challenges associated with hope and moving forward; help and the conditional or temporal nature of this; identity and stigma; and intimacy and relationships. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Implications include best practice for future planning with service users, the relational nature of hope, how best to manage endings and practical guidance for service developments in these settings.

Originality/value

These findings further the understanding of the challenges faced by service users with complex needs and how best to address them. They build on PIE guidance, offering tangible advice for practice.

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Catherine Harbor

This paper aims to explore the nature of the marketing of concerts 1672–1749 examining innovations in the promotion and commodification of music, which are witness to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature of the marketing of concerts 1672–1749 examining innovations in the promotion and commodification of music, which are witness to the early development of music as a business.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes as its basis 4,356 advertisements for concerts in newspapers published in London between 1672 and 1749.

Findings

Musicians instigated a range of marketing strategies in an effort to attract a concert audience, which foreground those found in more recent and current arts marketing practice. They promoted regular concerts with a clear sense of programme planning to appeal to their audience, held a variety of different types of concerts and made use of a variety of pricing strategies. Concerts were held at an increasing number and range of venues with complementary ticket-selling locations.

Originality/value

Whilst there is some literature investigating concert-giving in this period from a musicological perspective (James, 1987; Johnstone, 1997; McVeigh, 2001; Weber, 2001; 2004b; 2004c; Wollenberg, 1981–1982; 2001; Wollenberg and McVeigh, 2004), what research there is that uses marketing as a window onto the musical culture of concert-giving in this period lacks detail (McGuinness, 1988; 2004a; 2004b; McGuinness and Diack Johnstone, 1990; Ogden et al., 2011). This paper illustrates how the development of public commercial concerts made of music a commodity offered to and demanded by a new breed of cultural consumers. Music, thus, participated in the commercialisation of leisure in late 17th- and 18th-century England and laid the foundations of its own development as a business.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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