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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Laee Choi and Charles A. Lawry

Very few studies have considered how customer participation (CP) influences service employees' well-being. CP may lead employees to engage in emotional labor strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

Very few studies have considered how customer participation (CP) influences service employees' well-being. CP may lead employees to engage in emotional labor strategies (surface/deep acting), which can elevate their job stress. Whereas surface acting involves falsifying emotions, deep acting involves empathizing with others. Therefore, the current article examines how these emotional labor strategies arise from CP and create job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 is an online survey of service employees' wellbeing during CP (n = 509). Study 2 compares service employees' responses within hedonic and utilitarian service settings through a scenario-based experiment (n = 440). PROCESS was used to analyze the data in both studies.

Findings

First, study 1 supports that perceived CP increases job stress. Secondly, surface acting mediates the link between CP and job stress, but deep acting does not. Thereafter, Study 2 shows that the link between CP and job stress decreases as employee-customer identification (ECI) increases only during surface acting. Additionally, the impact of surface acting on job stress during CP is greater for hedonic services than utilitarian services, but there is no significant difference for deep acting.

Originality/value

This article contributes an original perspective by comparing models of service employees' responses to CP and job stress in hedonic versus utilitarian settings. Moreover, the intervening effects of ECI and emotional labor strategies on job stress, as demonstrated through these employee-facing models, offer added value to the CRM and co-creation literature.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Charles Aaron Lawry

The purpose of this study is to examine how phygital luxury experiences can be generated from mobile-mediated service activities while enabling luxury apparel shoppers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how phygital luxury experiences can be generated from mobile-mediated service activities while enabling luxury apparel shoppers to attain status goals and hedonic goals. Phygital luxury experiences are defined in this context as shopping experiences that blend the participative and immersive components of mobile and ubiquitous media with physical luxury servicescapes.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual research draws on activity theory from the field of human-computer interaction to produce an activity-centric model of phygital luxury experiences. By drawing on activity theory, the authors develop research propositions and build a conceptual model. The conceptual model probes how phygital luxury experiences can be generated from mobile-mediated service activities that enable luxury apparel shoppers to attain status goals and hedonic goals. In turn, service activities are proposed to meld with luxury shopping goals when mobile devices allow luxury apparel shoppers to participate in community-, rules-, and labor-based service activities.

Findings

First, the conceptual model demonstrates that social validation and personalization are status and hedonic drivers for community-based service activities (e.g. content-sharing and multiplatform storytelling). Second, special privileges and new comforts are status and hedonic drivers for rules-based service activities (e.g. engaging in pseudo-webrooming, pseudo-showrooming, and seamless and on-demand resources). Third, know-how and domination are status and hedonic drivers for labor-based service activities (e.g. adopting self-service technologies and smart or intelligent displays).

Originality/value

This conceptual model contributes to the well-documented need for research on interactive luxury strategies and luxury retail innovation. Overall, these service activities provide luxury brands and shoppers new opportunities for building elite communities, bending store rules, and altering the division of labor within physical stores. At the same time, this model shows that exclusivity and allure of luxury consumption can be reproduced through luxury apparel shoppers’ embodied interactions with salespeople and relevant audiences in connected store environments.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Khali Mofuoa

There is no doubt that there is a need for new traditions, that is, wisdoms for enhanced responsible business in Africa. As one of the oldest world economies, Africa has a

Abstract

There is no doubt that there is a need for new traditions, that is, wisdoms for enhanced responsible business in Africa. As one of the oldest world economies, Africa has a rich history of responsible indigenous business traditions that have sustained and supported her people’s principled business entrepreneurship over the centuries. However, there is little knowledge about these African responsible indigenous business traditions in the international literature. Currently, internationally familiar Western responsible business traditions dominate global responsible management knowledge and practice. The chapter explores responsible indigenous business traditions amongst the Sesotho-speaking people of Southern Africa called Basotho, bringing to light an aspect of responsible indigenous business management knowledge and practice from Southern Africa. These Basotho’s responsible indigenous business traditions embedded in Mokorotlo business model are Seahlolo, that is, communal, or mutual aid sharing, Letsema, that is, communal work party, Tsimo-ea-lira, that is, the field of enemies, Moelela, that is, food paid for work at threshing time, and Mafisa, that is, communal livestock loaning. The chapter concludes by suggesting that these Mokorotlo business traditions are prima facie attractive to be taken seriously in the global responsible management knowledge and practice.

Details

Responsible Management in Africa, Volume 1: Traditions of Principled Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-438-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Khali Mofuoa

This paper aims to discuss the notion of resilience in the context of the Basotho of Lesotho who managed prospering as a nation in the era of uncertainty during the “VUCA”…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the notion of resilience in the context of the Basotho of Lesotho who managed prospering as a nation in the era of uncertainty during the “VUCA” world of the nineteenth-century southern Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using historical data from leadership and organizational behaviour perspectives, the theoretical context of the paper is established to inform discussion on the resilience of the Basotho during the “VUCA” world of the nineteenth-century southern Africa.

Findings

The paper has established that the notion of resilience was synonymous to Basotho’s way of life and livelihood during the “VUCA” world of the nineteenth-century southern Africa. The paper has also established that resilience became the key quality of Basotho as they continued prospering as a nation in the era of uncertainty during the “VUCA” world of the nineteenth-century southern Africa.

Originality/value

From both leadership and organizational behaviour perspectives, the paper uses mainly historical data that are considered to be most relevant, valid and reliable to inform discussions on the notion of resilience as it relates to the Basotho as a nation during the “VUCA” world of the nineteenth-century southern Africa.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1903

As our readers are well aware THE BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL has invariably supported any legitimate effort having for its object the improvement, in one form or another, of the…

Abstract

As our readers are well aware THE BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL has invariably supported any legitimate effort having for its object the improvement, in one form or another, of the national food supply, and so long as the methods adopted are fair and above‐board this journal will continue to support such efforts by whomsoever they may be made. Fair and proper methods, however, are not always adopted, and a circular has recently been forwarded to us which affords an illustration of the fact.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1907

[On November 7 last, at a meeting of the society which we regret to see is still incorrectly styled the “Society of Public Analysts,” a valuable and highly interesting…

Abstract

[On November 7 last, at a meeting of the society which we regret to see is still incorrectly styled the “Society of Public Analysts,” a valuable and highly interesting paper, entitled “The Analyst and the Medical Man,” was read by Dr. F. Gowland HOPKINS, who attended the meeting by invitation for this purpose.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

Teacher Preparation in Australia: History, Policy and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-772-2

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1918

According to The Times, prompt action is likely to be taken by the Government to deal with the danger to the public health due to the consumption of contaminated, or…

Abstract

According to The Times, prompt action is likely to be taken by the Government to deal with the danger to the public health due to the consumption of contaminated, or essentially impure, milk. At present the authorities are faced with a serious difficulty, owing to the absence on active service of so many officials concerned with the administration of the law relating to these matters the release of whom was strongly urged in The Times recently. It was owing to the inroads made on the staffs of the central authority and the local administrations that the Milk and Dairies (Consolidation) Act of 1915 was not put into force. As soon as a sufficient number of officials are released by demobilization, and special steps are being taken to get this done, the administrative Orders under the Act will be put into force. A similar state of things exists in regard to the Tuberculosis Order of the Board of Agriculture which, among other objects, aims at the elimination of tuberculous cows from dairy herds. With both measures in effective administration very great progress in the removal of a national danger should be almost immediately made.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 20 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Eric Kong

This paper aims to examine five key strategic management concepts: industrial organisation (I/O), resource‐based view (RBV), knowledge‐based view (KBV), balanced scorecard…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine five key strategic management concepts: industrial organisation (I/O), resource‐based view (RBV), knowledge‐based view (KBV), balanced scorecard (BSC) and intellectual capital (IC) within the non‐profit context and to determine which is most applicable in the non‐profit sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the above concepts in the light of the unique non‐profit environment.

Findings

The IC concept is more effective compared with other strategic management concepts within the non‐profit context. IC is an important resource that non‐profit organisations need to develop in order to gain sustained strategic advantage.

Research limitations/implications

This paper helps to build a nascent body of literature suggesting that the concept of IC is the most effective strategic management concept in NPOs. The increased awareness of the IC concept in the sector, as a result of this paper, is likely to generate further research from both non‐profit practitioners and scholars.

Originality/value

Very little systematic research has reviewed the applicability of strategic management concepts within the non‐profit context. The paper acts as the first attempt to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Peter Robbins

In today’s hypercompetitive, digital-first, knowledge-based economy, organizational creativity has never been more important as a potential source of competitive…

Abstract

In today’s hypercompetitive, digital-first, knowledge-based economy, organizational creativity has never been more important as a potential source of competitive advantage. The foundation stone for every innovation is an idea and all ideas are born of creativity. The innovation process thus starts with creativity and the new ideas it yields are ideally based on insights that will lead ultimately to novel outcomes (such as new products, services, experiences or business models) and thereby to a sustainable competitive advantage. In established businesses, until relatively recently, creativity was called on only for specific, often high-profile occasions, for ‘hackathons’ or for major ‘innovation jams’, but today it is an essential, everyday necessity of routine work. However, attaining the right level of creativity from within is a challenge for many organizations and so they need to establish an appropriate and effective way to import it into their teams, projects and, ultimately, culture. The arts are a pure, unadulterated form of creativity. Mindsets, processes and practices from the arts can give organizational creativity a significant boost and can potentially offset the creative deficit in an organization. Here, the illustrative cases and practices that demonstrate how the arts can have a positive impact on business are examined.

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

Keywords

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