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Article

Nejib Hachicha and Amine Ben Amar

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically the impact of the Islamic Bank Financing on Malaysia’s economic growth over the period 2000Q1-2011Q4.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically the impact of the Islamic Bank Financing on Malaysia’s economic growth over the period 2000Q1-2011Q4.

Design/methodology/approach

A neoclassical production function augmented by some indicators of Islamic bank finance has been the theoretical framework for this paper’s empirical investigation. The unit root tests show that all the variables are integrated of order 1. The test of Johansen and Juselius (1990) has shown the existence of a single cointegrating relationship between the gross domestic product (GDP), the investment, the labor force and the indicator of Islamic bank finance. Hence, an error correction model has been constructed to estimate the economic growth elasticity with respect to the different Islamic bank finance indicators.

Findings

The estimated elasticities show that, in the long run, the GDP in Malaysia is not sensitive to the Islamic financing. The estimation of an error correction model shows that the elasticity of the Malaysian output with respect to the different Islamic financing indicators in the short run turn around 0.35. Thus, the effect of the different Islamic finance indicators on the economic growth in the long run is less important than their effect in the short run. This economic result can be explained by the structure of the Islamic bank financing that marginalizes the profit-and-loss sharing (PLS)-based instruments. This turns out to be consistent with the economic reality in Malaysia, as the Islamic banks engage much more in non-participatory activities whose impact is, generally, of short term.

Social implications

To improve the efficiency of the Malaysian Islamic banks as financial inter-mediaries that facilitate the capital accumulation and the economic growth, the paper suggests to strengthen the weight of the PLS-based instruments in the loan portfolios of the Malaysian Islamic banks. This may reduce inequalities and improve economic opportunities for people who have a high potential to contribute to the capital accumulation and the creation of the value-added.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is two-fold. On the one hand, it provides a further contribution to the rare empirical literature relative to the impact of the Islamic finance on growth by determining the elasticity of economic growth with respect to Islamic bank financing in Malaysia. On the other hand, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper remains the first to correctly resort to the error correction model in determining this elasticity.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article

Charles A. Banks

THE development, in 1929, of a large volume of dredgeable gold‐bearing gravel in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea brought the Directors of Placer Development, Ltd.…

Abstract

THE development, in 1929, of a large volume of dredgeable gold‐bearing gravel in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea brought the Directors of Placer Development, Ltd., the exploration company which had proved the area and wished to equip it, face to face with an unusually difficult transport problem. The solution of this was so satisfactorily overcome by the use of aeroplanes, that the writer felt that a short paper on the subject would be of interest to members, and, at the same time, helpful to such engineers as may later have somewhat similar problems to surmount.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 4 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Book part

Chang Lu and Trish Reay

We investigated how an institutional settlement concerning Native Indian gaming (the operation of gambling establishments such as casinos or bingo halls by Native Indian…

Abstract

We investigated how an institutional settlement concerning Native Indian gaming (the operation of gambling establishments such as casinos or bingo halls by Native Indian tribes) was preserved over time in spite of three significant challenges. Building on previous literature on settlements and institutional logics, we see settlements as institutional arrangements that manage power dynamics and competing institutional logics. Based on our analyses of the settlement and three challenges in the Native gaming field, we suggest that even seemingly volatile institutional settlements can be maintained when powerful actors balance each other’s ability to modify the settlement and different actors invoke alternative institutional logic(s). We also find that these processes can be facilitated by the embeddedness and formality of the settlement. We contribute to the settlement literature by showing how settlements can be maintained when actors draw on equally strong sources of power and different logics to counter the actions of other actors. Furthermore, we shed light on “how institutions matter” by demonstrating how institutional settlements can facilitate field stability.

Details

How Institutions Matter!
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-431-0

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Article

Diego Vega and Christine Roussat

In recent years, logistics service providers (LSPs) have become important players in the humanitarian field, providing support for NGOs and governments when they respond…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, logistics service providers (LSPs) have become important players in the humanitarian field, providing support for NGOs and governments when they respond to major disasters. However, the academic literature on humanitarian logistics has not really explored the roles that LSPs play in relief supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of LSPs in humanitarian relief.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a two-stage exploratory approach: first, it systematically reviews the humanitarian logistics literature to see the extent to which LSPs are taken into account. Then it analyses the web sites of leading LSPs to examine how they communicate about their role in humanitarian relief.

Findings

This research produces some surprising findings. While the academic literature seems to neglect the roles of LSPs in humanitarian logistics, some major third-party firms highlight their roles in relief networks. A number of research propositions are presented describing emerging roles for LSPs in relief supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on academic humanitarian logistics literature; a review of practitioner articles and the LSP literature might also be relevant. The web site analysis is based on corporate communication which may contain bias. Further research should add to this work with NGO/government perspectives and produce primary data in order to demonstrate the external validity of the research propositions.

Practical implications

The research identifies different roles LSPs could play in humanitarian supply chains, suggesting opportunities for new business lines.

Originality/value

The main contributions of this paper are to explore the roles LSPs could play in humanitarian logistics and to bring a new perspective to humanitarian logistics research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

Charles Blankson, Seth Ketron and Joseph Darmoe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employment of positioning strategies in the retail bank sector of Sub-Saharan Africa, specifically using Ghana as the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employment of positioning strategies in the retail bank sector of Sub-Saharan Africa, specifically using Ghana as the study context. In addition, it explores the applicability of western-based typology of positioning strategies in the Sub-Saharan African environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Six retail banks – three national and three foreign – are studied, each through an in-depth case study method: covert and participant observation techniques; and face-to-face interviews of chief executive officers, marketing managers, and bank branch managers provided data for the study.

Findings

The results show that the “service” positioning strategy is the most popular strategy employed by retail banks. “Value for money,” “attractiveness,” “brand name,” and “country of origin” positioning strategies are also dominant. “Top of the range” and “selectivity” strategies are minimally pursued by the sample of banks studied. The results reveal that both foreign and national retail banks employ multiple positioning strategies in the face of competition. However, foreign retail banks consistently employ a; large number of strategies relative to national retail banks. This paper supports the applicability of a western-derived set of positioning strategies in the Sub-Saharan African marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

This study closes a gap in the understanding of positioning, as well as filling the empirical gap in the application of positioning. In addition, it helps resolve a contextual gap of knowledge in Sub-Saharan Africa’s retail banking sector.

Originality/value

This study responds to Porter (1996), Clancy and Trout (2002), and Knox (2004) for continued empirical research in positioning in service industries and specifically in Sub-Saharan African economies (Coffie, 2014, 2016; Coffie and Owusu-Frimpong, 2014). Moreover, this research adds value to the banking and marketing literatures through a qualitative case study method, which is an important yet overlooked research method (Yin, 2009).

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade…

Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

David Adeabah, Agyapomaa Gyeke-Dako and Charles Andoh

This study aims to analyze the efficiency of banks under board gender diversity and to examine the determinants of bank efficiency.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the efficiency of banks under board gender diversity and to examine the determinants of bank efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for analysis were sourced from annual reports of 21 banks for the period from 2009 to 2017. A two-step framework was used: first, an examination of efficiency scores with and without board gender diversity computed using data envelopment analysis; and second, a regression of board gender diversity as a determinant of bank efficiency using panel estimation on an unbalanced panel data.

Findings

The results reveal that gender diversity promotes bank efficiency up to a maximum of two female directors on a nine-member board of directors, suggesting a threshold effect on bank efficiency. Board size improves bank efficiency. Board independence is negatively related to bank efficiency. Also, powerful chief executive officers are detrimental for bank efficiency. Finally, the authors find that ownership structure, bank size, bank age and loan-to-deposit ratio are important factors affecting bank efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

All bank-year observations with no female representation on the board were excluded. As such, this paper is limited to 21 banks. Future research should look at a larger data set and account for dynamic endogeneity.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to bank governance structure, namely, gender composition of boards, and provides an insight for regulators and shareholders to estimate the role of men and women on boards.

Originality/value

The novel feature of the efficiency model used is that it incorporates board gender diversity as an additional input variable, in line with the preposition of proponent of resource dependency theory.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

The main purpose of this study is to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a cross-sectional research design and data were collected from the poor who resides in rural Uganda. Structural equation modelling (SEM) through analysis of moment structures (AMOS) was used to analyze the data. Bootstrap approach with 5,000 samples was run to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Findings

The results showed that social network significantly and positively mediate the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries. In addition, financial literacy also has a direct significant and positive effect on financial inclusion. Overall, the findings suggest that the presence of social network fully mediate the effect of financial literacy on financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopted a cross-sectional research design and data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Future studies could adopt longitudinal research design to establish the dynamic characteristics of the samples under study over time. Besides, this study collected data from only poor households who were clients of microfinance banks located in rural Uganda. It ignored the other section of the population who were not the poor. Therefore, future studies could use the other section of the population who are clients of commercial banks.

Practical implications

The advocates of financial literacy and managers of microfinance banks in developing countries should ensure using existing local structures such as community and village associations to conduct financial literacy training. The village associations help in mobilizing members who are close-knit based on the existing societal ties that can be used as a channel for disseminating vital financial literacy information. Indeed, financial literacy workshops, seminars, and business clinics can be easily conducted to individuals who are members of the village associations.

Originality/value

This paper integrates social network theory in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries. Social network acts as a conduit through which financial knowledge and skills flow to increase the scope of financial inclusion of the poor in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Charles W. Hultman

The ability of foreign banks to market their services byestablishing a physical presence in US markets to a great extent dependsupon US legislative enactments, regulatory…

Abstract

The ability of foreign banks to market their services by establishing a physical presence in US markets to a great extent depends upon US legislative enactments, regulatory actions, and judicial interpretations, all of which have been subject to significant change since the late 1980s. Examines recent changes in the US regulatory structure that will have an impact on the operations and marketing strategy of agencies, branches and subsidiaries of foreign banks in US markets. The major focus is on PL 102‐242 which was signed into law in December 1991, regulatory changes designed to implement G‐10 risk‐based capital adequacy guidelines, and other regulatory efforts to impose prudential bank management policies on the US financial services sector. In general, the thrust of the legislative‐regulatory changes will be to increase the sensitivity of banks to the risk associated with their activities. This, in turn, will require a modified marketing strategy to accommodate changes in profit opportunities and in bank customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part

Philippe Naszályi

This chapter attempts to offer a clearer look at the historical roots of the founding of mutualist finance. Without denying that the various forms of financial mutualism…

Abstract

This chapter attempts to offer a clearer look at the historical roots of the founding of mutualist finance. Without denying that the various forms of financial mutualism may have legal and organizational roots in ancient times, the author considers what, for contemporary mutualist banks, may constitute the soul.

In its first part, the document presents the individual constructions that existed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in a context in which economic development and the industrial revolution banished the rules and standards of the former society. It refers to Utopian socialisms as opposed to the scientific solutions proposed for a new social organization and to the new solidarism according to Léon Bourgeois. Christian sources are also called to mind with social Christianity (Protestant) and social Catholicism until the birth of the social doctrine of the Church.

This frenzy of ideas as well as the confrontation with reality led to the birth, in Germany, of the first experiments with alternative finance. This is the subject of the second part of this chapter, which then develops the bank mutualism created by the founding fathers, F.W. Raiffeisen and H. Schulze-Delitzsch.

The historical description of the creation of mutualist banks brings up two major problems when talking about the “other finance”: the interest and activity of the bank. Is an ethical finance capable of proposing a credible alternative? This is a question that needs to be answered in the light of history.

This chapter attempts, more than 150 years after the fact, to demonstrate the ponderous presence of the question and the permanence of the founding ideas in order to comprehend the facts and propose ideas for analysis and construction of an “other finance.”

Details

Recent Developments in Alternative Finance: Empirical Assessments and Economic Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-399-5

Keywords

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