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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Jetske van Westering

In this era of rapid changes consumers have become less brand loyal and are always looking for the new “in” product As the result of these changing preferences chances for…

Abstract

In this era of rapid changes consumers have become less brand loyal and are always looking for the new “in” product As the result of these changing preferences chances for new products are steadily rising. The range of aperitifs has remained unchanged for at least twenty years, sales of products like Sherry and Vermouth are steadily in decline. This article investigates the chances of a hitherto little known product in the UK, namely Pineau des Charentes. It also reports on research carried out amongst producers in the Pineau producing area into factors that could influence the success of Pineau.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1904

In a Report, issued on July 9, 1896, the Select Committee on Food Products Adulteration recommended the establishment of a central government scientific authority, who…

Abstract

In a Report, issued on July 9, 1896, the Select Committee on Food Products Adulteration recommended the establishment of a central government scientific authority, who should act as a court of reference upon scientific questions arising under the Adulteration Acts, and who should be empowered, at their discretion, to prescribe standards and limits as to the quality and purity of food. It was rightly held by the Select Committee that the constitution of such an authority is an absolute necessity in order that the all‐important question of food standards may be duly considered and dealt with, and that all matters affecting the administration of the Acts and involving scientific considerations may be placed on a more satisfactory footing. The Committee also expressed the opinion that the formation of such an authority would result in the removal of many practical difficulties met with in the administration of the Acts, and would largely obviate the costly litigation in which public bodies, traders, and others are constantly liable to be involved under existing conditions. Nothing whatever has been done to give effect to the recommendation of the Committee in spite of the fact that the necessity for some such course of action as that indicated has been demonstrated beyond possibility of question, and that further evidence proving the wisdom of the Committee's suggestion is constantly afforded. The Islington brandy case provides the latest illustration of the extremely unsatisfactory conditions under which public bodies are required to administer the Acts and under which traders have to answer charges made against them. A local grocer was summoned by the Islington Borough Council for selling, as brandy, a liquid which was certified by the Public Analyst to contain 60 per cent. of spirit not derived from the grape, and which was therefore not of the nature, substance and quality of the article demanded. The vendor naturally referred the matter to the firm who had supplied him. The case was taken up by a traders' association, and, after five lengthy hearings, in the course of which much expert evidence was given on both sides, resulted in a conviction and the infliction of a penalty of £5 and £50 costs—an amount which probably represents only a fraction of the expense involved. For the present we do not propose to review the scientific evidence which was put forward by the prosecution and by the defence. There is no doubt that Mr. FORDHAM, the magistrate who heard the case, was perfectly right in taking the view that the term “brandy,” when unqualified, means a spirit distilled from wine or from fermented products of the grape. It is also perfectly plain that when a person asks for brandy and is supplied with coloured grain spirit, or with a mixture of grain spirit and true brandy, he is prejudiced, and that the vendor commits an offence under the Acts. The fact that the term “brandy” has been commonly applied to “silent spirit” coloured and flavoured to imitate true brandy, or to mixtures of brandy and alcohol derived from other sources than the produce of the grape, is not a legitimate excuse for the sale of such factitious articles as “brandy.” The great difficulty lies in differentiating by analytical means between the genuine article and the imitation. The vast majority of people, being utterly ignorant even of the elements of chemistry, labour under the impression that all that need be done in a matter of this kind is to tell the Public Analyst to “analyse,” and that full, exact, and absolutely definite information which nobody can call in question, will be forthcoming as a matter of course. The evidence given in the case under consideration is quite enough in itself to show the absurdity of this assumption. On the one hand the Public Analyst stated that he was satisfied, from the results of his general investigations in regard to brandy and from the results of his analysis of the sample submitted to him, that this sample contained 60 per cent. of spirit other than that derived from the produce of the grape. On the other hand, a number of analytical experts called for the defence asserted that in the present state of analytical knowledge it was perfectly impossible for any Public Analyst to arrive at the conclusion mentioned in regard to the sample in question, and that, as a fact, the analytical evidence adduced did not justify the statement made in the certificate on which the proceedings were founded. The defence do not appear to have denied that the Public Analyst might be right. In reality it appears only to have been contended that his analytical evidence was not, sufficient to prove that he was so. At any rate the experts called for the defence certainly did not prove by scientific evidence that he was wrong.

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British Food Journal, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1909

It is a matter of common knowledge that beer, in its several varieties, is by no means the same thing to‐day as it was a generation or less ago; the progress of chemical…

Abstract

It is a matter of common knowledge that beer, in its several varieties, is by no means the same thing to‐day as it was a generation or less ago; the progress of chemical and biological knowledge on the one hand, and the keenness of competition on the other, have led to great alterations both in the materials used in its production and the methods by which it is produced. Exact or reliable knowledge about this, however, is far from being common; vehement assertions are made that all or almost all the changes are for the better, and also that beer is now a manufactured chemical product of deleterious nature, in which little or nothing of genuine material is used. Such statements are rendered unacceptable by the existence of self‐interest on one side and prejudice on the other. A short account of some of the facts concerned may, therefore, be of service.

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British Food Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1904

It is apparently becoming the fashion among certain types of self‐sufficient persons in this country to endeavour to bring discredit upon the scientific expert…

Abstract

It is apparently becoming the fashion among certain types of self‐sufficient persons in this country to endeavour to bring discredit upon the scientific expert, and—whenever the practice can be indulged in with impunity—to snub and to insult him as far as possible. While this course of procedure is particularly to be observed when the expert is called upon to give evidence in a Court of Law, or to explain technical points before some highly inexpert body, it is not only in these circumstances that he is subjected to misrepresentation, discourtesy, and downright insult. Whenever a case occurs which appears to afford pabulum capable of being twisted into shape for the purpose, certain newspapers— generally, we are glad to say, of the lower class—are invariably ready to publish cheap sneers at science and scientific men, frequently accompanied by insulting suggestions. Other journals of a better class do not indulge in abuse and insulting suggestions, but confine themselves to lecturing the expert or experts with all that assurance which is characteristic of blatant ignorance. Accusations of incompetence and of culpable negligence are common in the gutter Press and in some so‐called Courts of Justice. Even suggestions of bad faith and of failure to honourably discharge duties undertaken are sometimes to be met with. It cannot be supposed that the reason for all this is to be found in the conduct of some very few persons who, in the eyes of all right‐thinking people, have brought discredit on themselves by appearing as “ advocate‐witnesses ” to defend the indefensible. At any rate, the conduct of such individuals affords no justification for tarring everybody with the same brush. The hostile, acidly‐cantankerous, and frequently grossly insolent attitude adopted by certain persons and in certain quarters towards those experts whose duties are of a public character and connected with legal or semi‐legal proceedings, is due to a reason which is not far to seek. It is due, in the first place, to the disgraceful ignorance in regard to scientific matters, even of the most elementary kind, which unhappily pervades all classes of the community;' and, secondly, to that form of jealousy peculiar to the small and mean mind which detests and kicks at anything and everything beyond its power of comprehension. When apparently contradictory evidence is given by scientific witnesses—appearing on opposite sides in a case—it is obviously far more easy and satisfactory to shriek about the “ differing of doctors ” than to admit that one's own miserable ignorance prevents one from seeing the points and from ascertaining whether there is any real contradiction or not. It is far more convenient to suggest that the public analyst, for instance, does not know what he is about, has made some absurd mistake, or has been guilty of scandalous negligence, than to admit that one does not understand his certificate owing to one's own defective education or inferior intellectual capacity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 6 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1976

J.A. Dawson

In 1973 the Loi Royer was passed in France with the object of curbing large‐scale hypermarkets and shopping centres. But although in 1974 and 1975 the rate of large shop…

Abstract

In 1973 the Loi Royer was passed in France with the object of curbing large‐scale hypermarkets and shopping centres. But although in 1974 and 1975 the rate of large shop openings decreased dramatically this may have been due more to the recession in the French economy than to the effects of the legislation. In this article John Dawson examines in detail the applications for different types of development.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Sophie Elias‐Varotsis

The issues at stake in this paper namely concern the changes in the cultural identity representations of territorial landscapes as a result of increasing mobility of which…

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Abstract

The issues at stake in this paper namely concern the changes in the cultural identity representations of territorial landscapes as a result of increasing mobility of which tourism is but one of the numerous forms. The decision to focus on festivals and events is that: 1. Traditionally speaking, festivals and events are both the result and the signifiers of the cultural identity of spaces within which they occur; 2. In more recent years, they have increasingly been instrumented as a marketing tool in the development of tourist spaces as can be attested by the large body of tourist literature; 3. Beyond the emphasis placed by researchers on the economic impacts of events organization, there has been a growing interest in investigating their social impacts. 4. Limited attention has been paid to comparing the strategies of events organization, the way they intervene on cultural identity and the ensuing impacts on territorial development in general. Accordingly, it was decided that an investigation of regularly recurring events, which have become part of the territorial landscapes within which they occur, would be led to try and answer the following questions: 1. How do festivals and events contribute to staging the particularities of cultural identity within different spaces? 2. Are these festivals and events staged simultaneously to encourage greater mobilities to and within the given spaces and to devise better responses to the mobilities that have already modified them? 3. To what extent do festivals and events contribute to re‐interpreting cultural identity?

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Tourism Review, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2002

Abstract

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The Comparative Study of Conscription in the Armed Forces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-836-1

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Alistair Williams, Glyn Atwal and Douglas Bryson

The purpose of this study is to identify how craft spirits distilleries use elements of the storytelling narrative as part of a storytelling marketing strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify how craft spirits distilleries use elements of the storytelling narrative as part of a storytelling marketing strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was undertaken based on seven craft distilleries in and around Chicago, IL. Data were collected from various sources including direct observation and secondary data based on online press coverage company websites and social media.

Findings

In the sample of firms, the authors identified the following seven categories of storytelling themes: craft, innovation, origins, myth, celebrity, provenance and collectability. These categories comprise both functional and emotional components which are strongly associated with the concept of authenticity.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to investigate storytelling within the craft spirits sector. The results are relevant to develop strategies for marketing craft spirits brands. Findings are relevant for spirits distilleries in Chicago, IL but have transferable learnings for beverage categories who desire to stage meaningful, valued customer experiences.

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International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Jetske van Westering

Examines the changing trends in world Cognac sales, and the potential of emergent markets — particularly China — as trade and tariff restrictions change and world politics…

Abstract

Examines the changing trends in world Cognac sales, and the potential of emergent markets — particularly China — as trade and tariff restrictions change and world politics make these alternatives more receptive to the West.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

David Rowlands

The purpose of this paper is to offer a personal insight from a retired care professional into attitudes to the ageing process and being old. It shows how moving to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a personal insight from a retired care professional into attitudes to the ageing process and being old. It shows how moving to another country in later life can improve quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an invited opinion piece and comment based on the author's experiences in dealing with their own ageing. It is an autobiographical account which challenges conventional views about the expected ways to meet the challenges of ageing.

Findings

Retirement need not lead to a “static” view of one's life. Meeting the challenge of moving to another country in later life can lead to new and renewed friendships, improvements in memory in learning a new language and developing enhanced awareness of other cultures. Moving house and home can be a stimulating adventure even when one is older.

Originality/value

Personal insights from experienced care professionals can demonstrate ways of responding to the challenge of ageing that are constructive and positive. It could encourage others to take up and confront their own forms of “adventure” as they grow older.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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