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Article

Daniel Wolf and Brooke Felger

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of change readiness and resolve as a principal feature of strategic teams. Change leadership and management in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of change readiness and resolve as a principal feature of strategic teams. Change leadership and management in the context of strategy, talent and culture provide the organization with the capacity for navigating change at the process, category and business levels. This paper provides a practical look at the cultivation of strategic teams as agents for making change strategy happen.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have examined a series of variables that inform the strategic agenda, talent blocks and beams, and the cultural agenda for organizations large and small. They have built a general framework for mapping and engaging what serves as a strong mind-set of change readiness and resolve, along with specific team-building elements for learning and development.

Findings

Strategic teams that are part of the structure and culture of the organization serve as development grounds for change competence and capacity at the group and individual levels. Further, because there are several types of strategic teams with diverse roles and functions, the change readiness and resolve mechanics are subject to experimentation and adaptation. This results in a strong mind-set for change leadership and management and the ability to deploy effectively across a range of situations, needs and challenges.

Originality/value

This work offers a practical set of views on change and adaptive capacity, and the development pathways that afford an organization the ongoing preparation of individuals and groups for changes in process and policy, programs and categories and business models through the most demanding transformation journeys.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Book part

Deborah Ancona and Mary J. Waller

Previous research suggests that teams pace their change either internally to coincide with the midpoint, deadline, or task phases, or externally by entraining to exogenous…

Abstract

Previous research suggests that teams pace their change either internally to coincide with the midpoint, deadline, or task phases, or externally by entraining to exogenous pacers. Other research suggests that teams adapt to random environmental shocks. This paper investigates if, how, and when endogenous, exogenous, and random pacers affect the patterns of change in groups. We studied five software development teams during a turbulent two-year period. Our case studies and supporting analyses suggest that teams perform a “dance of entrainment”—simultaneously creating multiple rhythms and choreographing their activities to mesh with different pacers at different times.

Details

Workplace Temporalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1268-9

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Book part

Mary Zellmer-Bruhn, Mary J Waller and Deborah Ancona

This chapter examines the relationship between team routines and temporal entrainment. While the process of entrainment generally reinforces the routines that teams follow…

Abstract

This chapter examines the relationship between team routines and temporal entrainment. While the process of entrainment generally reinforces the routines that teams follow temporal entrainment also creates opportunities for externally focused teams to change their routines. Entrainment creates team rhythms that include pauses in activity that can act as triggers to change. These pauses alone are not enough to impel teams to change; managers must also employ temporal design to make use of these opportunities for change. Both the rhythms of temporal entrainment and the pauses that accompany them are part of a team’s task environment. By uncovering key rhythms, as well as by managing the pauses, managers can both reinforce desired routines and change problematic ones.

Details

Time in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-093-7

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Book part

Angela C. C. Keister

Organizational agility is becoming a critical component of organization development and change due to the increasingly continuous and iterative nature of change. This…

Abstract

Organizational agility is becoming a critical component of organization development and change due to the increasingly continuous and iterative nature of change. This explanatory mixed methods study demonstrates the effect of collective thriving on change agility and positions collective thriving as a psychological state that contributes to organization agility. Attunement is hypothesized to be a point of leverage to increase the state of collective thriving and was found to moderate the relationship between collective thriving and change agility. The qualitative study investigates characteristics of high- and low-thriving teams and furthers the understanding of collective thriving and change agility.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

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Article

David Coghlan

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is throughgroups and that there are many different aspects of groups inorganizational life. Holds that the…

Abstract

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is through groups and that there are many different aspects of groups in organizational life. Holds that the informal influence a group exerts on individual members through socialization, enforcement of norms and development of culture is powerful in how individuals respond to organizational change. Argues that teambuilding is critical to forming group responses to change issues, whether through the formal teams or through temporary task forces and committees.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Velma Lee, Frank Ridzi, Amber W. Lo and Erman Coskun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the learner styles of a healthcare institution transition team and its respective members within a change management context. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the learner styles of a healthcare institution transition team and its respective members within a change management context. In particular we focus on the role of learner style in the success of change efforts within a team setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study that employs a questionnaire survey, non‐participant observation, and semi‐structured interviews as part of a larger study of healthcare change management.

Findings

Findings suggest that a mix of learning styles is ideal for successful healthcare change management. Specifically, this limited study suggests a learner ratio that favors convergers and assimilators over divergers and accommodators may be the most effective staffing strategy for change leadership teams in a healthcare environment.

Originality/value

Managing change in healthcare has been researched from a process perspective but few studies examine the individual team members' learner styles and the impact of these learning styles over time. Implications for human resources and change implementation are discussed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part

Gertjan Schuiling

This chapter describes the change efforts and action research projects at a Dutch multinational which, over a period of 25 years, produced in one of its businesses a…

Abstract

This chapter describes the change efforts and action research projects at a Dutch multinational which, over a period of 25 years, produced in one of its businesses a zigzag path toward collaborative leadership dynamics at the horizontal and vertical interfaces. The chapter also identifies the learning mechanisms that helped achieve this transformation. Changing the patterns at the vertical interfaces proved to be a most tricky, complex, and confusing operation. The data show that organizations need hierarchical interfaces between levels, but are hindered by the hierarchical leadership dynamics at these interfaces. The data furthermore show that competitive performance requires more than redesigning horizontal interfaces. A business can only respond with speed and flexibility to threats and opportunities in the external environment when the leadership dynamics at agility-critical vertical interfaces are also changed.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

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Book part

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Book part

Tobias Fredberg, Flemming Norrgren and Abraham B. (Rami) Shani

Increasing market pressures require organizations to rethink the development of change capability. Building a sustainable and flexible organization capable of responding…

Abstract

Increasing market pressures require organizations to rethink the development of change capability. Building a sustainable and flexible organization capable of responding in a timely manner to quickly changing customer demands without compromising technological excellence and quality is a complex task. This chapter builds on a five-year study of transformation efforts at a product development unit of Ericsson. The complexity of designing and managing learning mechanisms as both a transformation engine and a way to improve new product development is captured. The chapter points toward the challenges of designing and managing learning mechanisms that enhance organizational agility.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

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Article

Pascale Benoliel and Izhak Berkovich

The concept of teams tends to be marginalized in the scholarly discussion of school improvement. The purpose of this paper is to argue that teams play a crucial role in…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of teams tends to be marginalized in the scholarly discussion of school improvement. The purpose of this paper is to argue that teams play a crucial role in promoting an holistic integration of school operation necessary to support school change. Specifically, the paper outlines the dynamic of effective teams at times of school improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the concept of teams, elaborates on their central function as a “coupling mechanism,” and describes the reciprocal relations between teams and school change.

Findings

The paper emphasizes the reciprocal effects of teams and change, suggesting that teams can serve as key change agents in school restructuring processes, specifically when balancing between “coping” and “pushing” forces. Based on the model, effective team leadership and effective school leadership at times of school change are introduced. Practical implications are discussed for school leaders.

Originality/value

The integration of the concept of teams into the school improvement discourse might assist school leaders to develop processes and procedures that will enable both school teams and schools to react more effectively in times of change and restructuring.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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