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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Khaled Medath Aldossari, Brian C. Lines, Jake B. Smithwick, Kristen C. Hurtado and Kenneth T. Sullivan

Although numerous studies have examined alternative project delivery methods (APDMs), most of these studies have focused on the relationship between these methods and…

Abstract

Purpose

Although numerous studies have examined alternative project delivery methods (APDMs), most of these studies have focused on the relationship between these methods and improved project performance. Limited research identifies how to successfully add these methods within architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) organizations. The purpose of this paper is to identifying organizational change management (OCM) practices that, when effectively executed, lead to increased success rates of adopting APDMs in owner AEC organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven OCM practices were identified through a comprehensive literature review. Then, through a survey of 140 individuals at 98 AEC organizations, the relationships between OCM practices and organizational adoption of APDMs were established.

Findings

The findings indicate that OCM practices with the strongest relationship to successful APDM adoption are realistic timeframe, effective change agents, workloads adjustments, senior-leadership commitment and sufficient change-related training.

Practical implications

Adopting APDMs can be extremely difficult and requires significant organizational change efforts to ensure the change is a success. Organizations that are implementing APDMs for the first time should consider applying the OCM practices that this study identifies as most related to successful APDM adoption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing body of knowledge by identifying the OCM practices that are most significantly associated with successfully adopting APDMs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Paulina Arroyo

The purpose of this paper is to propose an institutional entrepreneurship approach to examining management accounting change triggered by social and environmental concerns.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an institutional entrepreneurship approach to examining management accounting change triggered by social and environmental concerns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study begins with a literature review concerning the role that old institutional economics and new institutional sociology have played in the study of management accounting change, underlining strengths and weaknesses. To deal with the main weaknesses, the institutional entrepreneurship approach is presented and utilized as the basis for the development of a conceptual framework, which is contextualized to the examination of management accounting change triggered by sustainability issues.

Findings

Management accounting change literature has not paid enough attention to the social constructivist roots of institutional theory. Through the application of a conceptual framework inspired by institutional change models and institutional entrepreneurship literature, this paper proposes another approach to examine how new management accounting practices are socially constructed during the course of organizational change, particularly in response to sustainability concerns.

Research limitations/implications

This new framework has not yet demonstrated its explanatory power in a particular field.

Originality/value

The paper examines management accounting change as a social construction process led by institutional entrepreneurs who aim to mobilize resources and negotiate the definition and implementation of sustainability strategies and new management accounting practices, which will take environmental and social issues into consideration, in order to reach an agreement on the pre‐institutionalization, diffusion and institutionalization of sustainable practices.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Arthur Jay Sementelli

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a Foucauldian concept into the theory and practice of OD and change management. The piece challenges Habermasian a priori…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a Foucauldian concept into the theory and practice of OD and change management. The piece challenges Habermasian a priori assumptions about organizational diagnosis and intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper.

Findings

Literature points to the benefit of considering the possibility of parrhesiastic behavior in change management and organization development as part of a broader set of diagnostic tools.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should engage in practice driven test cases, interview practicing change managers, and refine the concept for use as a diagnostic tool.

Practical implications

Including discussions of parrhesia in change management and OD study and practices can better prepare change professionals for the realities of contemporary organizational practices.

Originality/value

To date, the links developed in this manuscript have not been made in the management literature, though it builds upon emerging literature in critical management studies and human resource management. It has the potential to influence both theory and practices of both OD and change management.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Jacob Hallencreutz and Dawn‐Marie Turner

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether there are some existing widespread and common models and definitions for organizational change best practice in the literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether there are some existing widespread and common models and definitions for organizational change best practice in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on previous research to define a model of evidence‐based change management base practice. A structured literature review is used to search for contemporary models and definitions of organizational change best practice.

Findings

No consistent definitions of organizational change best practice are to be found in the literature.

Originality/value

The paper provides a snapshot of the current literature on organizational change best practice. Implications of the findings on organizational change best practice are discussed and further research suggested.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Peter Yamakawa, Claudio Obregón Noriega, Alfredo Novoa Linares and Willy Vega Ramírez

Although various practices to facilitate organizational change are proposed in the literature, very little is known about how these practices impact on ITIL adoptions…

Abstract

Purpose

Although various practices to facilitate organizational change are proposed in the literature, very little is known about how these practices impact on ITIL adoptions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to address this gap in the literature by offering insights on how change management practices impact on levels of ITIL compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research reports on four case studies of completed implementations of IT service management using the process – based ITILv2 framework. The firms studied are from the Peruvian financial sector. Data were gained primarily through semi‐structured in‐depth interviews with managers involved in the implementation process. Compliance was measured using the itSMF self assessment questionnaire, which assesses the overall process capability.

Findings

This study finds that not all of the case firms took full advantage of change management practices while implementing the ITIL framework. The results show that the firms with a higher use of change management practices achieved higher levels of ITIL compliance. Additionally, change practices related to change preparation were used more frequently and fewer practices related to the implementation and consolidation stages were reported.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined change management practices in the context of ITIL implementation projects. This study also uses the levels of ITIL compliance as an outcome measure.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Carolyn Fowler

The purpose of this paper is to document the types of and any changes in the budgeting and performance management practices of New Zealand primary educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the types of and any changes in the budgeting and performance management practices of New Zealand primary educational organisations and explain why they occurred using an institutional theory framework. In doing so, it will provide an understanding of past budgeting and performance measurement and reporting practice, as well as consider the policy implications for the contemporary public‐provided primary education system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a historical archival‐based case study approach.

Findings

The historical evidence suggests that from 1844 until 1859 budgeting and performance management practices in educational organisations changed as the provision and control of education moved from not‐for‐profit community‐based organisations to become a predominantly public function. The budgeting, inspection and performance management practices and changes observed in the primary education providers were directly related to their need to obtain legitimacy and procure resources.

Practical implications

The detailed information regarding historical budgeting and performance management practices provides rich background material for researchers as well as suggesting that split responsibility and control between the community and government for education creates a tension between the two controlling bodies.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study of internal accounting and performance reporting practices in a mid‐nineteenth century New Zealand education context.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Vagelis Dedoussis

Changes are under way in Japan’s distinctive human resources management practices as the state of the economy remains fragile following the country’s prolonged recession…

Abstract

Changes are under way in Japan’s distinctive human resources management practices as the state of the economy remains fragile following the country’s prolonged recession. However, such changes may not necessarily point to the eventual collapse of the Japanese employment system, as sometimes suggested. Despite the adjustments companies have made to cope with the economic downturn, distinctive human resources management practices in Japan’s large‐scale enterprises are unlikely to disappear altogether. This paper argues that the relationship between large‐scale enterprises and an even smaller segment of the permanent workforce will continue to be defined by distinctive management practices. Thus, what is actually taking place in Japanese management is an ad hoc reshuffle rather than substantial restructuring of internal labor markets.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

Ruthanne Huising

Organizations that adopt new practices employ managers to make decisions about how to materialize these practices. I examine how these managers move between the meanings…

Abstract

Organizations that adopt new practices employ managers to make decisions about how to materialize these practices. I examine how these managers move between the meanings and resources found in extra-local and local realms. I find that managers’ practices shift over time from adapting BPR practices to inhabiting BPR as an idea. Managers’ approaches are shaped by each organization’s history of efforts to introduce extra-local ideas. Rather than adapting BPR practices, managers draw on change tools, techniques, and methods that have worked in the organization and integrate BPR work into ongoing interactions, activities, and language in the local context.

Details

The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2016

Ivana Crestani

This chapter outlines current and emerging approaches in change communication from both scholarly and practice perspectives, and what this means for organisations and…

Abstract

This chapter outlines current and emerging approaches in change communication from both scholarly and practice perspectives, and what this means for organisations and practitioners, including practical implications for education. A literature review is conducted using the Kemmis and McTaggart framework for studying practice based on individual-social, objective-subjective dichotomies leading to an integrated reflexive-dialectical approach. Five roles are suggested for the practitioner in leading and influencing change, namely that of a Communication Architect, a Story-enabler, an Empathiser, an Engager and a Community Builder. These roles go beyond the traditional informative role, to practitioners co-constructing communication with stakeholders during change. With new ways of thinking about change management, there is the possibility for new methods of educating practitioners beyond the traditional qualification or professional certification. These would require greater collaboration between scholars and practitioners in creating vehicles for continuous learning.

Details

The Management Game of Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-716-8

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