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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Kevin C. Wooten

Changes in the traditional values, institutional context, and choice of change programs are currently shaping the postmodern science and practice of organization…

Abstract

Changes in the traditional values, institutional context, and choice of change programs are currently shaping the postmodern science and practice of organization development (OD). These changes manifest themselves in powerful new value orientations, intervention frameworks, and practices that challenge OD's long-held beliefs in ethical and justice-based treatment. In this effort, traditional and new paradigm ethical dilemmas are explored, as well as their relationship to four postmodern practices and five emergent intervention techniques. Components of distributive, procedural, and interactional justice are explained relative to change management programs generally, and to emergent techniques specifically. Published case illustrations are used to depict new paradigm ethical dilemmas and opportunities to create a “just change.”

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-547-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Paddy O’Toole, Steven Talbot and Justin Fidock

Stories told in organisations are being used increasingly as a way of gaining greater insight into organisational culture, leadership and health. These insights should be…

Abstract

Stories told in organisations are being used increasingly as a way of gaining greater insight into organisational culture, leadership and health. These insights should be considered when organisational change is needed to improve effectiveness. This paper examines a method that combines data collection through a story elicitation process with intervention design that promotes change and learning within organisations. In this paper, we describe these processes in detail with a step‐by‐step account of how the authors implemented these processes in a research site. Our experience can act as a guide to other researchers undertaking similar projects. Evidence collected so far suggests that these processes can contribute to organisational change in an incremental way that engages people at various levels within an organisation.

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Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Teresa Joyce Covin

Reports results from an extensive survey of major American changeprogrammes which revealed a set of clusters of interventions. Mosttypically, the change programmes…

Abstract

Reports results from an extensive survey of major American change programmes which revealed a set of clusters of interventions. Most typically, the change programmes involved combinations of intervention techniques. Team‐building, strategic planning, skill building and restructuring were the most common interventions. Success, however, appeared to depend on complex interactions amongst individual, organizational and change process variables.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

André de Waal and Ivo Heijtel

In recent years, the concept of the high-performance organization (HPO) has gained interest among organizations seeking to outperform their competitors and ensure business…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the concept of the high-performance organization (HPO) has gained interest among organizations seeking to outperform their competitors and ensure business continuance. However, despite an increasing number of studies on high performance, the literature still does not present a clear organizational change approach with change interventions that effectively transform “ordinary organizations” into HPOs. This study aims to fill this gap in the literature by identifying change interventions that have proven themselves in practice, i.e. they actually increase commitment of managers and employees to the HPO transformation process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study consists of developing a theoretical HPO change approach based on the change model of Whelan-Berry and Somerville (2010), followed by testing and applying the resulting 21 change interventions at a case company going through an HPO transformation.

Findings

The research results show that 75 per cent of the applied change interventions were either effective or very effective. Also, 25 per cent of the interventions were not very effective; most of these were individual-oriented.

Research limitations/implications

The change interventions with positive outcomes in this study can be applied by organizations during the HPO transformation. Future research should be performed in multiple industries and countries to investigate whether industry and country factors affect the effectiveness of change interventions.

Originality/value

Although much has been written about approaches for organizational change interventions, no change interventions specifically for creating an HPO are mentioned in the literature. Thus, the relevance of this study is that it constitutes the first step toward filling the gap in current literature on effective change interventions. This study provides a set of effective change interventions that drive successful HPO transformations.

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Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Maedeh Gordali, Marjan Bazhan, Mohtasham Ghaffari, Nasrin Omidvar and Bahram Rashidkhani

The purpose of this study is to determine how transtheoretical model (TTM) constructions change through nutrition education for fat intake modification among overweight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine how transtheoretical model (TTM) constructions change through nutrition education for fat intake modification among overweight and obese women living in Shazand city, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-experimental design with intervention and control groups (50 women in each group) was performed. TTM constructions for dietary fat intake were measured through a questionnaire in four phases: before the intervention, immediately, one month and six months after the intervention. Participants in two groups were classified into inactive and active subgroups, based on their determined stage of change. Then in the intervention group, each subgroup received a separate education program of five or eight sessions for the active and inactive subgroups, respectively.

Findings

The intervention resulted in significant progress in participants' stage of change compared to the control group (p = 0.002). Also, it resulted in an increase in the self-efficacy and decisional balance scores in both of the intervention subgroups, with these effects being more pronounced in the inactive subgroup, and these significant differences, compared to the control group, remained in the third and fourth phases. The intervention also positively impacted the behavioral processes, but this effect was not so long-lasting and decreased after six months.

Originality/value

The results indicated the intervention effectiveness and the necessity of planning educational interventions to change fat consumption behavior. This study provides further insight into effective and sustainable nutrition education strategies based on behavioral change stages rather than traditional approaches. These methods should be used to design group interventions to change individuals' health behavior in future works.

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Health Education, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Anya Johnson, Helena Nguyen, Markus Groth, Karyn Wang and Ju Li Ng

The culture of an organization shapes the attitudes and behaviors of employees and plays a key role in driving organizational outcomes. Yet, it is enormously challenging…

Abstract

Purpose

The culture of an organization shapes the attitudes and behaviors of employees and plays a key role in driving organizational outcomes. Yet, it is enormously challenging to manage or change. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature on culture change interventions in health care organizations to identify the common themes underpinning these interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is developed from an extensive review of the literature on culture change interventions in health care from 2005 to 2015, building on previous reviews and highlighting examples of good practice.

Findings

All culture change interventions included in the review used processes and techniques that can be classified into Lewin’s (1951) three stage model of change. These include providing evidence for the need for change through data, a range of successful change strategies, and strategies for embedding the culture change into business as usual.

Practical implications

There is no “one size fits all” recipe for culture change. Rather, attention to context with key features including diagnosis and evaluation of culture, a combination of support from leaders and others in the organization, and strategies to embed the culture change are important for the change process to happen.

Originality/value

The authors provide an important insight into the key principles and features of culture change interventions to provide practitioners with guidance on the process within health care and other organizations.

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Jennifer Anne de Vries and Marieke van den Brink

Translating the well-established theory of the gendered organization into strategic interventions that build more gender equitable organizations has proven to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Translating the well-established theory of the gendered organization into strategic interventions that build more gender equitable organizations has proven to be difficult. The authors introduce the emergence of the “bifocal approach” and its subsequent development and examine the potential of the “bifocal approach” as a feminist intervention strategy and an alternative means of countering gender inequalities in organizations. While pre-existing transformative interventions focus on more immediately apparent structural change, the focus begins with the development of individuals. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Developed through iterative cycling between theory and practice, the “bifocal approach” links the existing focus on women’s development with a focus on transformative organizational change. The bifocal approach deliberately begins with the organization’s current way of understanding gender in order to build towards frame-breaking transformative change.

Findings

The authors show how the bifocal is able to overcome some of the main difficulties of earlier transformative approaches, maintaining organizational access, partnership building, sustaining a gender focus and ultimately sustaining the change effort itself. The bifocal approach seeks structural change, however, the change effort rests with individuals. The development of individuals, as conceived within the bifocal approach was designed to create a “small wins” ripple effect, linking individual (agency) and organizational change (structure).

Practical implications

The bifocal approach offers a comprehensive re-modelling of traditional interventions for other scholars and practitioners to build on. Organizational interventions previously categorized as “fixing women” could be re-examined for their capacity to provide the foundation for transformative change.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper lies in proposing and examining the bifocal approach as a feminist intervention strategy that overcomes the dualism between the existing frames of organizations and the transformative frame of scholars, in order to move practice and theory forward.

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Thomas L. Case, Robert J. Vandenberg and Paul H. Meredith

A survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to samples ofinternal and external change agents which measured the extent to whichthey professed values traditionally…

Abstract

A survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to samples of internal and external change agents which measured the extent to which they professed values traditionally associated with the field of OD. The survey also included questions concerning the types of interventions utilised in the change programmes that respondents had been associated with in the previous five years as well as how these programmes had been evaluated. As predicted, external change agents were more likely to profess traditional OD values and to be associated with change programmes which included human processual interventions. Contrary to expectations, internal change agents were less likely than external change agents to be associated with the utilisation of technostructural interventions. Support was also generated for the prediction that internal change agents are more likely to carry out extensive programme evaluations.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Birte Dohnke, Tanja Dewitt and Amina Steinhilber

Unhealthy eating among adolescents from families with lower social status is a major concern. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Unhealthy eating among adolescents from families with lower social status is a major concern. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a prototype-targeting intervention for the promotion of healthy eating in this target group.

Design/methodology/approach

The planning model intervention mapping (IM) was chosen to proceed systematically, to use theory and evidence herein and to make decisions transparent. A controlled study with three times of data assessment was conducted to evaluate process characteristics and effects (N=108).

Findings

“Provide opportunities for social comparison” (behavioural change technique 6.2) was chosen as change method and “perceived similarity” was identified as the condition for its effectiveness. An intervention unit was designed for application. The evaluation results show the feasibility of the unit; materials and activities successfully applied the change method and its condition for effectiveness; and intervention objectives were generally achieved.

Practical implications

A prototype-targeting intervention is provided that is based on theory and evidence, and is suitable for implementation. More generally, the paper can serve as a blueprint for the systematic planning of theory- and evidence-based interventions targeting specific personal determinants for behaviour change.

Originality/value

The paper makes an important contribution to the application of the prototype-related theory and a useful addition of IM to the growing field of intervention development and design.

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Jeffery Houghton, Christopher Neck and Kenneth Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that nutritious food intake is a somewhat overlooked yet essential aspect of corporate wellness that has the potential to help…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that nutritious food intake is a somewhat overlooked yet essential aspect of corporate wellness that has the potential to help provide organizations with a sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first discusses the resource‐based view, identifying ways in which nutritious food intake across an organization may serve to create rare and inimitable organizational resources leading to a competitive advantage. It then presents a basic overview of the fundamentals of nutritious food intake. It proceeds to review the transtheoretical stages of change model in the context of tailored nutrition interventions in organizations, providing a detailed overview of key individual behavior focused and environmental focused change strategies along with a discussion of types of technical delivery systems.

Findings

The paper suggests that an organization may be able to use a tailored stage‐based nutrition intervention as part of a comprehensive wellness program in order to help create a sustainable competitive advantage based on the nutritious food intake of its members.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should continue to examine the effectiveness of stage‐based computer tailored nutrition interventions and their delivery systems, particularly in the context of comprehensive corporate wellness plans and the extent to which this serves to create a competitive advantage through lower direct healthcare costs and higher worker productivity.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders should carefully consider the strategies and methodologies presented in this paper when designing and implementing nutrition interventions as part of a broad corporate wellness program.

Originality/value

This paper makes a valuable contribution to the organizational literature by recognizing the potential for the application of the transtheoretical stages of change model from the field of nutrition education within the context of the resource‐based view of organizations.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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