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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Robert Mason, Chandra Lalwani and Roger Boughton

The purpose of this paper is to focuss on customer driven supply chains and what this means for the management of freight transport, a key process in the supply chain as…

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14168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focuss on customer driven supply chains and what this means for the management of freight transport, a key process in the supply chain as it acts as a physical link between customers and suppliers. It aims to assess whether some of the new collaborative models for transport management are delivering better optimised solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a multi‐dimensional methodological approach, which includes empirical, model building, opinion and archival evidence. Much of the thinking and findings in this paper have been derived from a series of quasi‐delphi discussion sessions with logistics industry experts from three sectors, steel, grocery and construction and experienced academics in the fields of logistics and supply chain management.

Findings

The paper sets out to argue that new innovative solutions are emerging for better transport optimisation, that exploit the competitive power of collaboration, both vertically with supply chain partners and horizontally with other logistics service providers (LSPs).

Research limitations/implications

The research was largely focused on the road freight transport industry in the UK and Europe. However, it is felt that similar thinking can be deployed in other settings for alternative transport modes and other geographical regions. From an academic perspective the paper contributes to the notion that supply chain management as well as focussing on vertical coordination and process integration also needs to incorporate the potential considerable power of horizontal collaboration.

Originality/value

In particular it is original in that it highlights how important it is to combine vertical collaboration with horizontal collaboration if better optimised transport solutions are to be achieved. This is of considerable value and interest both to practitioner and academic communities.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

John Mangan, Chandra Lalwani and Brian Fynes

The purpose of this paper is to examine traditional, current and emerging roles played by ports in the context of logistics and supply chain management practice and…

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10331

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine traditional, current and emerging roles played by ports in the context of logistics and supply chain management practice and strategy. The paper also seeks to elaborate the emerging concept of port‐centric logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws its insights and conclusions from a review of the literature, and an analysis of current trends and data concerning the ports and maritime transport sector.

Findings

The paper shows that ports can play a variety of different roles within supply chains and that they are not restricted to their traditional role of simple transhipment point for freight.

Research limitations/implications

While the paper reviews the roles played by ports in logistics and supply chain management generally, a useful next step would be to analyse specific flows and activities at/through ports within selected supply chains, thus allowing validation of a framework of roles for ports in the context of various supply chain strategies.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the potential, which in many cases is still latent, for ports to engage in port‐centric logistics activities.

Originality/value

The paper both highlights (given the fact that the vast majority of freight at some point transits ports) and extends the understanding of the role(s) of ports within supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Ming J. Ding, Booi H. Kam and Chandra S. Lalwani

Though resource based view (RBV) has been applied extensively in supply chain studies to examine how firms utilize logistics resources to attain superior performance…

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2222

Abstract

Purpose

Though resource based view (RBV) has been applied extensively in supply chain studies to examine how firms utilize logistics resources to attain superior performance, relatively little attention has been directed to exploring the effects of operational routines on logistics and supply chain (L&SC) competencies. The purpose of this paper is to examine the causal linkages between operational routines and L&SC competencies of Chinese logistics service providers (LSPs).

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model on the relationships between operational routines and L&SC competencies was developed based on RBV. In total, 76 valid responses from a survey of Chinese LSPs provided the empirical data for the testing of the formulated hypotheses. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to develop the constructs for the model and hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Not all operational routines were drivers of L&SC competencies in the Chinese logistics market. Processes for increasing responsiveness are most important in contributing to building positioning, distribution support and agility competencies. Processes for increasing flexibility are only effective in developing positioning competency, while performance benchmarking has little contribution to competency building in the Chinese market. ICT support strengthens the relationship between performance benchmarking and distribution support, but weakens that between processes for increasing flexibility and distribution support as well as that between processes for increasing responsiveness and agility.

Research limitations/implications

This study raises more questions than it attempts to answer, opening up a number of horizons for further research into the logistics market of China. Several follow‐up studies have been suggested, including a multiple case study on how Chinese LSPs contrive their operational routines to respond to the exigencies of market situations.

Practical implications

Findings from this study have significant managerial implications in resource investment and competency building to generate competitive advantage in the Chinese logistics market.

Originality/value

This research sheds new insights on the routine‐capability‐competency building chain in China's fragmentary logistics industry. It indicates that despite over three decades of economic reform, and ascension to the World Trade Organization, China remains a distinctively unique market environment with ingredients for operation success vastly different from those of the developed economies.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Andrew Potter, Robert Mason and Chandra Lalwani

The paper aims to analyse the reasons behind the leadership shown by a case study retailer through the introduction of factory gate pricing (FGP) within the grocery…

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4354

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyse the reasons behind the leadership shown by a case study retailer through the introduction of factory gate pricing (FGP) within the grocery sector. Further, there is an evaluation of the transport management techniques used to support FGP and the operational benefits gained.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based around a single case study of a UK grocery retailer, which has adopted FGP. A range of data sources has been collected during a project with the retailer. Techniques used include process mapping, interviews, workshops and company presentations.

Findings

Strategically, the introduction of FGP has provided economies for the retailer strengthening its position in the market. Four main transport management techniques have been deployed to achieve this, generating reductions in transport and inventory costs while improving customer service levels. There are also some issues that need addressing, in relation to the need for a single point of control, who manages this point and the technological capabilities of transport providers.

Research limitations/implications

Only a single case study is presented, and the research was carried out during the early phase of implementation.

Practical implications

FGP requires a certain degree of scale to be effective, and should complement current processes within a business. There is a need to manage relationship issues with suppliers and transport providers.

Originality/value

The paper presents a detailed case study of FGP within the grocery sector, which is more complex than previous application of the concept. The strategic rationale for pioneering FGP is considered, along with its tactical deployment and operational benefits. Concerns are also highlighted, to provide a balanced evaluation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

John Mangan, Chandra Lalwani and Bernard Gardner

The majority of logistics research is primarily populated by quantitative research viewed through a positivist lens. Increasingly, there are calls for logistics research…

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32729

Abstract

The majority of logistics research is primarily populated by quantitative research viewed through a positivist lens. Increasingly, there are calls for logistics research to more frequently employ qualitative methodologies. The trend in management research generally is increasingly to use methods and approaches which provide a middle ground between the contrasting positivist and phenomenological paradigms and perspectives. Methodological triangulation, using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, increasingly provides multidimensional insights into many management research problems. This paper urges logistics researchers to think about the paradigm through which they view the world and to explore the use of alternative methodologies. If the ultimate aim is to gain knowledge about the world then one needs to do this in the most valid way possible. This paper describes the dominant research paradigms and perspectives and their generally concomitant research methodologies and describes some research (decision‐making concerning choice of ports/ferries) where methodological triangulation, using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, yielded greater insights than would have been the case if a single research methodology had been employed.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

Patrick Rigot-Muller, Chandra Lalwani, John Mangan, Orla Gregory and David Gibbs

– The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an optimisation method, and resulting insights, for minimising total logistics-related carbon emissions for end-to-end supply chains.

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1898

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an optimisation method, and resulting insights, for minimising total logistics-related carbon emissions for end-to-end supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on two real-life UK industrial cases. For the first case, several alternative realistic routes towards the UK are analysed and the optimal route minimising total carbon emissions is identified and tested in real conditions. For the second case, emissions towards several destinations are calculated and two alternative routes to southern Europe are compared, using several transport modes (road, Ro-Ro, rail and maritime). An adapted Value Stream Mapping (VSM) approach is used to map carbon footprint and calculate emissions; in addition Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) data provided information for vessel specification allowing the use of more accurate emission factors for each shipping leg.

Findings

The analysis of the first case demonstrates that end-to-end logistics-related carbon emissions can be reduced by 16-21 per cent through direct delivery to the UK as opposed to transhipment via a Continental European port. The analysis of the second case shows that deliveries to southern Europe have the highest potential for reduction through deliveries by sea. Both cases show that for distant overseas destinations, the maritime leg represents the major contributor to CO2 emissions in the end-to-end supply chain. It is notable that one of the main apportionment approaches (that of Defra in the UK) generate higher carbon footprints for routes using Ro-Pax vessels, making those not optimal. The feasibility of the optimal route was demonstrated with real-life data.

Originality/value

This research used real-life data from two UK companies and highlighted where carbon emissions are generated in the inbound and outbound transport chain, and how these can be reduced.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mengying Feng, John Mangan and Chandra Lalwani

The purpose of this paper is to report a comparative investigation of port performance between Western Europe and Eastern Asia and develop a strategy to improve their port…

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5411

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a comparative investigation of port performance between Western Europe and Eastern Asia and develop a strategy to improve their port performance accordingly.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review is conducted in order to identify factors for port performance evaluation. A large‐scale questionnaire survey is employed in two port regions for comparative analysis.

Findings

Descriptive techniques and t‐tests indicate that port performances in the case port regions are different from each other in some factors and that they share some common features in certain other factors. The findings reveal that the most critical differences between the case ports are government support, proximity, speed of cargo handling, safety and port technical infrastructure in descending order. The Western European ports need to improve on government support, reduce port charges, diversify port ownership and improve port connectivity, while the Eastern Asian ports need to improve customs services, expand hinterlands, enhance logistics demand, encourage intermodalism and set up “dry ports”.

Research limitations/implications

This study was restricted to two port regions in China and the UK and data used in this research were mainly generated from questionnaire surveys, responses to which are, to some extent, subjective.

Practical implications

Ports must provide services that meet and exceed customers' expectations to be competitive. This research yields practical insights for port managers to improve port performance as quantifying factors allows them to prioritize and compare the factor performance. The results of the empirical study can also assist port stakeholders to formulate their operational strategy for port performance improvement.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to knowledge by addressing a gap in empirical research concerning performance comparison between Western European and Eastern Asian ports.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Adrian E. Coronado Mondragon, Chandra Lalwani and Christian E. Coronado Mondragon

In a growing number of competitive sectors with closed‐loop supply chains, the reverse component has become an inherent part of the business, not to mention a core…

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5478

Abstract

Purpose

In a growing number of competitive sectors with closed‐loop supply chains, the reverse component has become an inherent part of the business, not to mention a core competence; hence the need to have performance measures that can be used to provide an accurate diagnosis of the state of the supply chain by addressing both its forward and its reverse components. It is also important to identify the level of existing integration between parties, as this has been associated with supply chain performance. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Elements gathered from the literature reviewed are used to present a set of measures that can be applied for auditing purposes in: the forward supply chain; product returns and reverse logistics; flows of materials and information and integration between supply chain tiers. To illustrate the use of the proposed set of measures for auditing purposes a case study involving a major European mobile phone network operator was analysed using the operator's own brand of handsets characterised for having a closed‐loop supply chain.

Findings

The proposed set of measures for auditing purposes provide an overall picture of the performance of a closed‐loop supply chain by revealing high levels of stock for the products analysed, consequence of the difficulty to generate accurate forecasts and the accumulation of high quantities of product prior to launch. Also the methodology presented in this paper identifies links between product returns (faulty and non‐faulty) to operations in the forward component of the supply chain (design, sourcing, manufacturing and forecasting) and also indicates how performance is affected because of integration.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed set of measures for auditing purposes is relevant to closed‐loop supply chains which are related to products with short life cycles and during their lifetime can experience faulty and non‐faulty returns. The scope of the study presented may look limited; however, the application of the performance measures presented in this research can become a fundamental component of larger audit exercises. Further research should be carried out with supply chains on products with lifetime cycles that span long periods of time.

Practical implications

For industry sectors with closed‐loop supply chains, the availability of a set of measures that address the forward and reverse components plus integration can provide a detailed picture of the performance of value streams over traditional approaches to measurement that focus on only one component of the supply chain. The set of measures has the potential to be used to achieve better customer service and reduction in costs involving shipping, warehousing, labour and call centres.

Originality/value

The contribution of this research on closed‐loop supply chains is a methodology that defines performance measures for auditing purposes of the forward and reverse components of supply chains and assists in assessing the importance of integration between different tiers of supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Gilbert Aryee, Mohamed M. Naim and Chandra Lalwani

Outsourcing of non‐core activities and the subsequent vertical disintegration within manufacturing organisations have necessitated the need for process integration in the…

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3150

Abstract

Purpose

Outsourcing of non‐core activities and the subsequent vertical disintegration within manufacturing organisations have necessitated the need for process integration in the supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to develop a maturity scale to assess supply chain integration and hence improvement in supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved carrying out a questionnaire survey of UK manufacturing companies. In total, 29 responses were analysed.

Findings

The insight gained from the research is that the “soft” collaborative issues rather than the “hard” technological issues are the main drivers to improved supply chain performance. Most of the companies surveyed are still grappling with internal process integration with very few companies achieving closer integration with their customers.

Practical implications

Empirical evidence is found about an organisation's true stage of supply chain integration which affects its performance. Hard and soft variables or certain combinations of these do have a positive or negative effect on organisational performance.

Originality/value

A maturity scale is developed to capture an organisation's stage of supply chain integration. This scale also draws on relationships with organisational performance. As a maturity scale, it also shows direction or migratory paths to higher stages of supply chain integration.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Yingli Wang and Chandra S. Lalwani

This paper seeks to analyse and propose how e‐business can be coupled with different logistics strategies to achieve customized logistics sustainability (CLS).

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4048

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse and propose how e‐business can be coupled with different logistics strategies to achieve customized logistics sustainability (CLS).

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a conceptual model for CLS has been developed and, using four cases from industry, the model is further enhanced and validated.

Findings

Three main streams in supply chains, namely collaboration, dissolution, and innovation, are identified in a customised logistics domain. In each of the three streams, e‐business and relationship configurations are discussed in detail. Using four case examples, the research presented in this paper demonstrates how e‐business performance has hindered or improved the performance of customised logistics provision. A performance measurement (PM) system (efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency (E3) to evaluate the CLS has been proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The E3 PM system development in this paper is based on current research on performance in the literature. Using the case examples, the application of E3 has been explored. Further research on testing E3 as a good PM system in supply chains using empirical data is desirable.

Practical implications

The paper attempts to provide a guiding framework for practitioners on how to align and design different e‐business linkages with different customers.

Originality/value

There has been considerable research on how e‐business can be deployed by a focal company in supply chains in order to support its B2B collaboration with key customers and suppliers. There is little research on e‐business's potential in dealing with dynamic, unpredictable and sometimes sporadic customer demands. The research presented in this paper attempts to fill this gap by proposing a structured model incorporating different logistics streams, and a PM system for CLS.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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