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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Jhanghiz Syahrivar, Syafira Alyfania Hermawan, Tamás Gyulavári and Chairy Chairy

In general, Muslims consider Islamic consumption to be a religious obligation. Previous research, however, suggests that various socio-psychological factors may influence…

Abstract

Purpose

In general, Muslims consider Islamic consumption to be a religious obligation. Previous research, however, suggests that various socio-psychological factors may influence Islamic consumption. Failure to comprehend the true motivations for purchasing Islamic products may lead to marketing myopia. This research investigates the less explored motivational factors of religious compensatory consumption, namely religious hypocrisy, religious social control and religious guilt.

Design/methodology/approach

This research relied on an online questionnaire. Purposive sampling yielded a total of 238 Muslim respondents. The authors employed PLS-SEM analysis with the ADANCO software to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal the following: (1) Higher religious hypocrisy leads to higher religious social control. (2) Higher religious hypocrisy leads to higher religious guilt. (3) Higher religious social control leads to higher religious guilt. (4) Higher religious hypocrisy leads to higher religious compensatory consumption. (5) Higher religious social control leads to higher religious compensatory consumption. (6) Religious social control partially mediates the relationship between religious hypocrisy and religious compensatory consumption. (7) Higher religious guilt leads to higher religious compensatory consumption. (8) Religious guilt partially mediates the relationship between religious hypocrisy and religious compensatory consumption.

Research limitations/implications

First, religious compensatory consumption in this research is limited to Muslim consumers. Future research may investigate compensatory consumption in different contexts, such as Judaism and Christianity, which have some common religious tenets. Second, compensatory consumption is a complex concept. The authors’ religious compensatory consumption scale only incorporated a few aspects of compensatory consumption. Future studies may retest the authors’ measurement scale for reliability. Lastly, the samples were dominated by the younger generation of Muslims (e.g. generation Z). Future studies may investigate older Muslim generations.

Practical implications

First, this research illustrates how religiosity, guilt and social control may contribute to Islamic compensatory consumption. Islamic business practitioners and retailers targeting Muslim consumers can benefit from this research by knowing that Islamic consumption may be driven by socio-psychological factors, such as religious hypocrisy and guilt. As a result, businesses targeting Muslim consumers can develop marketing strategies that incorporate these religious elements while also addressing their socio-psychological issues in order to promote Islamic products. Second, Islamic business practitioners and retailers may consider the social environments in which Muslims are raised. The authors’ findings show that religious social control has direct and indirect effects on Muslims' preferences for Islamic products as a form of compensatory strategy. Islamic business practitioners may design marketing programs that revolve around Muslim families and their Islamic values. It is in line with the previous studies that suggest the connections between religions, local cultures and buying behaviours (Ng et al., 2020; Batra et al., 2021). In some ways, Islamic products can be promoted to improve the well-being and cohesion of family members and Muslim society in general. In this research, the authors argue that businesses' failures to understand the socio-psychological motives of Islamic consumption may lead to marketing myopia.

Social implications

As previously stated, religion (i.e. Islam) may be a source of well-being and a stable relationship among Muslims. Nevertheless, it may also become a source of negative emotions, such as guilt, because of one's inability to fulfil religious values, ideals or standards. According to the authors’ findings, Islamic products can be used to compensate for a perceived lack of religiosity. At the same time, these products may improve Muslims' well-being. The creations of products and services that revolve around Islamic values are expected to improve Muslims' economic conditions and strengthen their faith and love toward Islam in the globalized world. Moreover, Muslims, both as majority and minority groups, face increasing social pressures. On one hand there is the (in-group) pressure to uphold Islamic values and on the other hand there is the (out-group) pressure to preserve the local values and cultures. Indeed, living in the globalized world may require certain compromises. This research calls for various institutions and policymakers to work out solutions that enable all religious groups to work and live in harmony.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to study religious compensatory consumption quantitatively. This research operationalized variables previously discussed using a qualitative approach, namely religious hypocrisy, social control, guilt and compensatory consumption. The authors designed and adapted their measurement scales to fit this context, paving the way for future research in this field. Second, this research provides new empirical evidence by examining the relationships among less explored variables. For instance, this research has proven that several aspects of religiosity (e.g. hypocrisy, social control and guilt) may influence compensatory consumption in the Islamic context. This research also reveals the mediation roles of religious social control and religious guilt that were less explored in the previous studies. To the best of their knowledge, previous studies had not addressed social control as a predictor of compensatory consumption. Therefore, the theoretical model presented in this research and the empirical findings extend the theory of compensatory consumption. Third, Muslims are underrepresented in the compensatory consumption research; therefore, this research fills the population gap. Finally, this research focuses on Islamic compensatory behaviour as the future direction of Islamic marketing. Previous Islamic marketing research had not addressed the sensitive motives of Islamic consumption, which have now been highlighted in this research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this study are: to study the difference between halal awareness and halal certified awareness, and the relationship between the two variables; to study the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study are: to study the difference between halal awareness and halal certified awareness, and the relationship between the two variables; to study the differences in knowledge about halal and halal certified, as well as their relationship with halal awareness and halal certified awareness; and to build and test research models regarding factors that affect certified halal awareness.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population is Muslims who live in Indonesia and are 18 years old or more. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on a purposive sampling technique. The authors collect data from 428 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. This study applies the partial least square–structural equation model to examine causal relationships and test hypotheses.

Findings

This study reveals several results: halal awareness is a different concept from halal-certified awareness; knowledge of halal is a different concept from knowledge of halal certificates; awareness is an outcome of knowledge, but knowledge is not an outcome of awareness; halal awareness has a significant effect on halal-certified awareness; knowledge about halal certificates has a significant effect on halal-certified awareness, but knowledge about halal does not have a significant effect; knowledge of halal certificates is not influenced by knowledge of halal and halal awareness; and exposure and religious commitment have a significant role in increasing knowledge and awareness.

Originality/value

Research that explores the difference between halal awareness and halal certified awareness, and Muslim knowledge about halal and halal certified, especially in the context of halal-certified food, is still very limited in the literature provided, if not unavailable. Furthermore, this study also builds and tests research models regarding the factors that affect certified halal awareness, which is limited or may not have been found in the literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Jhanghiz Syahrivar, Chairy Chairy, Ignatius Darma Juwono and Tamás Gyulavári

A rarely discussed type of indulgence good is “virtual” goods featured in freemium games, one of the most important platforms for online retailing. The freemium business…

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Abstract

Purpose

A rarely discussed type of indulgence good is “virtual” goods featured in freemium games, one of the most important platforms for online retailing. The freemium business model becomes popular amid the growth of mobile games and smartphones. The purpose of this research is to look into the factors that influence the intention to play freemium games and purchase in-game virtual goods, as well as to compare male and female millennial gamers in Indonesia, Southeast Asia's largest mobile gaming market. This research discusses the phenomenon in the context of compensatory consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research used an online questionnaire for data collections. A total of 275 millennial mobile gamers were selected via purposive sampling. In total, there are six factors incorporated in this research: utility, self-indulgence, social interaction, competition, the intention to play freemium games and the intention to pay for virtual goods. This research used structural equation modelling (SEM) via AMOS software to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This research reveals that (1) utility is a negative predictor of the intention to pay for virtual goods, (2) self-indulgence is a positive predictor of the intention to play freemium games, (3) there is a mediation effect of the intention to play freemium games on the relationship between self-indulgence and the intention to pay for virtual goods, (4) social interaction is a positive predictor of the intention to pay for virtual goods, (5) competition is a positive predictor of the intention to play freemium games, (6) there is a mediation effect of the intention to play freemium games on the relationship between competition and the intention to pay for virtual goods and (7) the intention to play freemium games is a positive predictor of the intention to pay for virtual goods.

Research limitations/implications

This research has several limitations: first, half of the study’s millennial respondents were students whose gaming expenditures might depend on their parents or guardians' willingness to accommodate their gaming activities. Therefore, there might be some biases in the intention to pay for virtual goods. Second, the numbers of female respondents outweigh male respondents (44.4% males), hence the sample representativeness issue in a slightly male-dominated gaming industry in Indonesia. Third, the game genres the millennial respondents mostly played were the battle royale and the shooter games. Other game genres (e.g. puzzles) might involve a different mechanism. Lastly, the authors measured the compensatory consumption concept indirectly, such as by measuring variables associated with lack of time (utility), the need for virtual achievements or online recognitions (competition), mood-related issues (self-indulgence) and lack of belongingness (social interaction).

Practical implications

Game developers and online retailers (e.g. Google Play Store, Android App Store and Microsoft Store) should incorporate competition, indulgence and social interaction elements when designing and promoting freemium games. Based on the results of this research, a combination of these three elements improves the likelihood of purchasing virtual goods via online retail platforms

Originality/value

This is the first research to demonstrate a link between online retailing and compensatory consumption, particularly in the context of freemium games. This research extends the literature on online retailing in the context of freemium games, which has received little attention. In addition to theoretical support, this research provides new empirical evidence for previously unexplored and unsupported relationships.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Hardius Usman, Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo, Chairy Chairy and Marissa Grace Haque

The study proposes an extended model of the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including Sharia compliance (SC), knowledge of SC and confidence in SC, in addition to…

Abstract

Purpose

The study proposes an extended model of the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including Sharia compliance (SC), knowledge of SC and confidence in SC, in addition to perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived ease of use (PEOU). This research aims to investigate its impact on satisfaction, applied in e-banking of Indonesian Islamic banking. Also, the authors study the role of SC, knowledge of SC and confidence in all relationships in TAM in explaining customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collecting in this research is a self-administered survey by sending questionnaires to respondents online via e-mail or WhatsApp. The number of collected data are 300 completed questionnaires. Hypothesis testing and analyses in this research use the multiple linear regression model.

Findings

This study finds that SC, knowledge about SC and belief in SC have a significant impact on customer satisfaction of Islamic banks using e-banking. The most important finding in this study is that SC, knowledge about SC and belief in SC significantly moderate the relationship between PU and PEOU with customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is exploring the role of SC, knowledge of SC and confidence in SC in all relationships, and it is expressed in the original TAM to explain customer satisfaction. This study has never been applied in previous studies, particularly studies of Islamic bank e-banking in Indonesia. This study highlights the importance of SC in the extended TAM, as a distinguishing factor between e-banking provided by Islamic banks and conventional banks, as well as the role of knowledge and confidence in SC. The authors propose policies that will be useful for the improvement of the market share of Islamic banking in Indonesia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Hardius Usman, Dipa Mulia, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati

The purpose of this study is to propose an extended model of technology acceptance model (TAM) in the use of financial technology (Fintech) in the context of Islamic…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose an extended model of technology acceptance model (TAM) in the use of financial technology (Fintech) in the context of Islamic philanthropy, especially by studying and exploring the role of trust, image and religiosity in TAM, and to provide policy recommendation for the authorized organizations in Indonesia regarding several crucial factors that need to be considered so that Indonesian Muslims are willing to use Fintech for philanthropic purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were conducted to collect the data, of which 425 respondents have completed and returned the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression model and multi-variate analysis of variance are applied to test the statistical hypotheses.

Findings

This study supports the theory of reasoned action and the TAM. In which, the relationship between perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness with TAM is determined by trust and religiosity.

Research limitations/implications

It is worth to note the limitation of this study lies in the sampling technique and data collection. Indonesia is a fast archipelago country and consists of 34 provinces, but not all of the provinces are represented in the sample. The selected respondent heavily depends on the previous respondent’s willingness to share the questionnaire. So that the number of respondents does not proportionate to region or province.

Originality/value

This study offers an extended model of TAM that has never been done before, namely, by exploring the role of trust, religiosity and image, in the context of Islamic philanthropy.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Indrila Goswami Varma, Bhawana Chanana, Rambabu Lavuri and Jaspreet Kaur

The unprecedented pandemic of COVID-19 is not a typical crisis. This crisis has irrevocably altered human behavior, most notably consumption behavior. The uncertainty…

Abstract

Purpose

The unprecedented pandemic of COVID-19 is not a typical crisis. This crisis has irrevocably altered human behavior, most notably consumption behavior. The uncertainty caused due to economic insecurity and fears of death have resulted in a paradigm shift away from consumer materialism and toward consumer spiritualism. The present study examines the effect of various dimensions of “spirituality” on consumers’ conspicuous consumption of fashion. The study employs a descriptive empirical research design to determine the impact of multiple dimensions of spirituality on the conspicuous consumption of Generation Z in India. These dimensions include General spirituality belief, Global personal spirituality and reincarnation spirituality. Additionally, the moderating effect of dispositional positive emotion on the relationships mentioned above has been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were accumulated through purposive sampling from 517 Generation Z consumers and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Reincarnation, general personal and global personal spirituality had a direct positive impact on conspicuous consumption of fashion. Dispositional positive emotion had a positive moderation effect between the reincarnation, general personal and global personal spirituality and conspicuous consumption.

Originality/value

The study will assist fashion brands and retailers in better understanding consumer behavior and associated opportunities and threats post COVID-19. For merchants and business owners in emerging countries, this study will help them to apply new techniques for keeping customers. It is useful to evaluate a shopper’s views towards spirituality, disposition and conspicuous consumption.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Hadjer Troudi and Djamila Bouyoucef

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the verification of applicability of reasoned action theory to analyze consumer behavior in Algerian context; and second, the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the verification of applicability of reasoned action theory to analyze consumer behavior in Algerian context; and second, the identification and analysis of factors influencing purchasing behavior in green food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors proposed a model based on reasoned action theory that combines two types of variables, the green marketing type and personal type, in order to predict purchasing behavior of green food. The authors have established a structural equations modeling, with a path analysis on a sample of 304 Algerian consumers from Algiers town.

Findings

The model was confirmed and the results showed how green marketing and personal factors influence the green food purchasing behavior in direct and indirect way, in presence of the mediating variables’ attitude toward green food and intention to buy green food.

Research limitations/implications

There is no database or any information concerning green consumption in Algerian context. There is a lack of information about green production in food field. The choice of reasoned action theory as a theory explaining the decision-making process leading to purchasing act is based on fact that the Algerian field of food sector is virgin of this type of analysis, so the authors thought it is appropriate to apply the reasoned action theory as a first initiative in this field. Also, a more recent and more innovative psychological theory should be applied in the future studies.

Practical implications

The study will give researchers interested in Algerian context a better understanding of consumer behavior, especially in green product case, and will open new paths for future research in the same field by the application of another psychological theory that is more recent and innovative; the study can open research paths for other fields as well, such as consumer behavior toward green cosmetic products in Algeria.

Social implications

The implications of this research can assist marketers for better positioning in green food market using the results indicated in research. The better understanding of factors influencing consumer purchasing behavior will encourage contractors to invest in this field in Algiers town context.

Originality/value

The study was established in a context where consumer market data of green food are non-existent, so the research represents an orientation to green food marketers toward a better positioning in relation to influence factors of their market target.

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2022

Swagata Chakraborty and Amrut Sadachar

The authors investigated the role of cultural (i.e. traditional and religious) values in predicting the relationships between the attitudes toward the environment and slow…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors investigated the role of cultural (i.e. traditional and religious) values in predicting the relationships between the attitudes toward the environment and slow fashion and the purchase intention for sustainable apparel.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted in Amazon Mechanical Turk with the millennials of the US (n = 317). The data were analyzed through structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The connection with indigenous cultural values in terms of the (1) traditional values positively influenced attitudes toward the environment and slow fashion; (2) religious values positively influenced attitude toward slow fashion but did not influence attitude toward the environment. (3) Both attitudes towards environment and slow fashion positively influenced purchase intention for sustainable apparel. (4) The connection with cultural values did not influence purchase intention toward sustainable apparel directly; however, (5) attitude toward slow fashion mediated the relationship between connection with cultural values and purchase intention for sustainable apparel both in terms of traditional and religious values, and (6) attitude toward the environment mediated the relationship between connection with traditional values and purchase intention for sustainable apparel.

Practical implications

Instead of focusing only on pro-environmental messages, marketers should use culture-specific cues to evoke favorable attitudinal and behavioral responses toward sustainable apparel.

Social implications

Advertisement cues of sustainable apparel imbuing the target market's cultural values could help in protecting culturally significant elements of nature in the long-term by evoking positive attitudes toward the environment and slow fashion and encouraging purchase intention for sustainable apparel in the short-term.

Originality/value

The authors indicated the importance of indigenous cultural values in shaping favorable attitudes toward the environment and slow fashion and purchase intention for sustainable apparel.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Carlos J. Rodriguez-Rad and Encarnacion Ramos-Hidalgo

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of moral identity on the relations between the independent variable of spirituality and the original consumer…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating role of moral identity on the relations between the independent variable of spirituality and the original consumer ethics scale (OCES) and attitudes towards doing good and recycling practices of the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the various hypotheses of the model, the methodology used is that of partial least squares (PLS) path-modelling, which is a variance-based structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

This research reveals a full mediation of the construct of moral identity in the relationship between spirituality and doing good/recycling practices, and the rejection of those who do not perform these practices that are responsible from the point of view of sustainability. In addition, the existence is shown of a partial mediation of the construct of moral identity in the relationship between spirituality and consumer ethics scale (CES).

Practical implications

It is demonstrated that the main effect on the attitude of consumers towards the consumption of products and services of companies whose behaviour is responsible towards sustainability is mainly motivated by having a high standard of ethical and moral values and such strong beliefs, such as those of honesty, kindness, generosity and compassion. The main implication of this investigation is that the authors’ results suggest that the identification of these types of consumers would constitute an effective marketing strategy and an important variable of segmentation.

Originality value

This research is unique in two ways. First, this study proposes a model that provides a solution to the research problems caused by the incorporation of a fifth dimension into the OCES. Second, this paper is the first to investigate the role played by the moral identity as a mediator between the relationship of spirituality and attitudes towards unethical behaviour and doing good/recycling practices.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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