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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Chaipong Pongpanich, Tanasak Krabuanrat and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to compare the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to compare the findings in Thailand with the study carried out in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 700 questionnaires were sent to the 35 universities in Thailand that offer MBA degrees. This survey achieved a response rate of 23 percent.

Findings

The usage of simulation games in business schools in Thailand is still at an early stage of development. The primary reason to use such tools in both Thailand and the UK is that they help to increase students' interaction and teamwork. Meanwhile, lack of information on simulation games is major obstacle of using simulation games in their classroom teaching. However, the demand for computer simulations and games in the classroom is likely to increase in the future.

Research limitation/implications

The study provides good platform for further in‐depth study on this topic in Thailand. As for practical implication, it suggests a need for more collaboration between industry and academia so that simulation games will be developed to fit with the teaching courses.

Originality/value

This study highlights the key factors underpinning the usage of these new tools in classroom teaching in the Thai context.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Ying Kei Tse, Rupert L. Matthews, Kim Hua Tan, Yuji Sato and Chaipong Pongpanich

A growing need for global sourcing of business has subjected firms to higher levels of uncertainty and increased risk of supply disruption. Differences in industry and…

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Abstract

Purpose

A growing need for global sourcing of business has subjected firms to higher levels of uncertainty and increased risk of supply disruption. Differences in industry and infrastructure make it more difficult for firms to manage supply disruption risks effectively. The purpose of this paper is to extend developing research in this area by addressing gaps within existing literature related to environmental turbulence and uncertainties.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the model using data collected from 253 senior managers and directors in the Thai beverage industry using advanced statistical techniques to explore the relationship between representations of supply disruption risk and uncertainty.

Findings

The results show that both magnitude and probability of risk impact on the disruption risk, but the probability of loss is a dominant determinant. The authors also find that demand uncertainty and quality uncertainty affect the risk perception of purchasing managers, and are related to the magnitude of disruption risk, rather than the frequency of occurrence. Interestingly, the results show that quality uncertainty negatively impacts on the severity of disruption risk.

Research limitations/implications

The construct validity of demand uncertainty was under the required threshold, intimating the need for further construct development.

Practical implications

The framework provides managers with direction on how to formulate and target their disruption risk management strategies. The work also allows practitioners to critical reflect on implicit risk management strategies they may already employ and their effectiveness.

Originality/value

The paper identifies key antecedents of supply disruption risk and tests them within a novel industrial context of the beverage industry and a novel national context of Thailand.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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