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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Alessandro M. Peluso, Giovanni Pino, Cesare Amatulli and Gianluigi Guido

This research advances current knowledge about art infusion, which is the ability of art to favorably influence the assessment of consumer products. In particular, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research advances current knowledge about art infusion, which is the ability of art to favorably influence the assessment of consumer products. In particular, the research aims to investigate the effectiveness of artworks that evoke their creators’ most recognizable style in luxury advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

The research encompasses three studies – two conducted online and one in a real consumption situation. The first study explores the effect that a recognizable vs non-recognizable painter’s style has on consumers’ judgments about luxury products. The second and third studies explore the moderating roles of desire to signal status and desire for distinction, respectively, which are relevant to advertisers interested in targeting these individual differences.

Findings

Advertisements that incorporate artworks that evoke a painter’s most recognizable style enhance the advertised products’ perceived luxuriousness. Consumers with a higher desire to signal status exhibit greater purchasing intention in response to recognizable artworks. By contrast, consumers with a higher desire for distinction exhibit greater purchasing intention when the painter’s style in the featured artwork is less recognizable.

Practical implications

The results provide marketers with suggestions on how to select and incorporate visual artworks into luxury brand communication: they could focus on recognizable vs non-recognizable artworks based on whether their main goal is to communicate status or distinctiveness.

Originality/value

This research offers novel insights into the practical value of art infusion by showing when and for whom the beneficial effects of pairing art with luxury products are more likely to occur.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Cesare Amatulli, Matteo De Angelis, Giovanni Pino and Sheetal Jain

This paper investigates why and when messages regarding unsustainable luxury products lead to negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) through a focus on the role of guilt, need to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates why and when messages regarding unsustainable luxury products lead to negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) through a focus on the role of guilt, need to warn others and consumers' cultural orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments test whether messages describing unsustainable versus sustainable luxury manufacturing processes elicit guilt and a need to warn others and whether and how the need to warn others affects consumers' NWOM depending on their cultural orientation.

Findings

Consumers experience guilt in response to messages emphasizing the unsustainable (vs sustainable) nature of luxury products. In turn, guilt triggers a need to warn other consumers, which leads to NWOM about the luxury company. Furthermore, the results suggest that two dimensions of Hofstede's model of national culture – namely individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity – moderate the effect of the need to warn others on NWOM.

Practical implications

Luxury managers should design appropriate strategies to cope with consumers' different reactions to information regarding luxury brands' unsustainability. Managers should be aware that the risk of NWOM diffusion may be higher in countries characterized by a collectivistic and feminine orientation rather than an individualistic and masculine orientation.

Originality/value

Consumer reaction to unsustainable luxury, especially across different cultural groups, is a neglected area of investigation. This work contributes to this novel area of research by investigating NWOM stemming from unsustainable luxury manufacturing practices in different cultural contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Giuseppe Colella, Cesare Amatulli and María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz

This study aims at investigating how the level of brand–consumer interaction between luxury brands and consumers on social media may affect the perception of brands…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating how the level of brand–consumer interaction between luxury brands and consumers on social media may affect the perception of brands’ luxuriousness. In particular, this study is focused on the moderating role of consumers’ materialism.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quantitative approach. Data were collected with two online experiments. Study 1 was run to test whether a luxury brand’s product description was perceived as more luxurious when published on a social media platform versus the brand’s website, and if consumers’ materialism influences this effect. Study 2 explains the underlying psychological mechanism by underlining the mediating role of psychological distance.

Findings

The results show that branded luxury products are perceived as more luxurious when these are communicated on a social media platform (vs on the brand’s Web page), and consumers are high (vs low) in materialism, due to high psychological distance.

Originality/value

Previous literature has neglected the relationship between materialism and social media communication, as well as the potential differential effect that a high versus low level of brand–consumer interaction may have, for luxury brands, in the online context. This study fills this gap by investigating the role of a consumer-related characteristic (i.e. the level of materialism) that represents an important dimension in luxury consumption. Moreover, this study sheds light on the mediating role of psychological distance in the context of luxury brands’ online communication.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Cesare Amatulli, Matteo De Angelis, Sue Vaux Halliday, Jonathan Morris and Floriana Mulazzi

The purpose of this paper is to enrich country of origin (COO) effect in international marketing theory by adding the understanding of temporal dynamism into COO research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich country of origin (COO) effect in international marketing theory by adding the understanding of temporal dynamism into COO research.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a qualitative and interdisciplinary phenomenological approach, this paper analyses historical and contemporary sources triangulated with contemporary primary interview data. The example of how perceptions of Italians about the values typical of the British Sixties varied over time periods is presented.

Findings

COO perceptions are both malleable and in evolution. Results show that values from earlier peak periods of appeal can be combined and recombined differently over time due to the varying historical and contemporary resonances of COO values.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on COO applied to two product areas, fashion and music, over a limited time period, in a two-country study and so the findings are not fully generalizable, but rather are transferable to similar contexts.

Practical implications

The fact that COO is neither static nor atemporal facilitates a segmented approach for international marketing managers to review and renew international brands. This enriched COO theory provides a rich and variable resource for developing and revitalizing brands.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is that temporal dynamism, never before discussed in international marketing theory, renders COO theory more timeless; this addresses some critiques recently made about its relevance and practicality. The second contribution is the original research design that models interdisciplinary scholarship, enabling a thorough historical look at international marketing.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Cesare Amatulli and Gianluigi Guido

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the latent determinants of the purchasing intention for fashion luxury goods.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the latent determinants of the purchasing intention for fashion luxury goods.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 40 in‐depth interviews were conducted with Italian customers in a fashion luxury goods store in Italy. Qualitative research was employed in data collection using the laddering technique and the means‐end chain (MEC) analysis.

Findings

Results showed that consumers buy luxury fashion goods mainly to match their lifestyle, thus satisfying their inner drives. The hierarchical value map resulting from the data collection and elaboration demonstrates that self‐confidence and self‐fulfillment are the main hidden final values when buying and consuming luxury goods. Implications for marketers are related to tailoring products, brand values and communication messages to the subjective, self‐rewarding and “internalized” consumption sought after by consumers.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is based on the use of the laddering technique and the means‐end chain (MEC) analysis for investigating latent determinants of purchase intention for fashion luxury goods. Moreover, the paper examines this topic in the Italian market, which represents a relevant instance of mature market for fashion luxury goods.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

María Pilar Martínez‐Ruiz, Noemí Martínez‐Caraballo and Cesare Amatulli

This work aims to analyze the relationship between a tourist destination and the success of luxury stores. The main objective is to examine whether there is any…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to analyze the relationship between a tourist destination and the success of luxury stores. The main objective is to examine whether there is any relationship between different features of a tourist destination and the number of years that a store has been operating there.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes a sample of stores located in Venice. A survey was carried out on luxury goods stores in Venice by personally interviewing their managers.

Findings

The paper identifies a significant relationship between the number of years that the stores have been operating in the tourist destination and their nationality.

Originality/value

Despite the favorable connotations that location in a tourist destination would appear to offer, companies seem to base their general strategy on intangible aspects such as image and brand capital. A number of conclusions and recommendations for managers of luxury stores were obtained from the study. In the light of the minimal impact that contact with other stores and the efforts of local authorities have had so far on the success of these establishments, it may be necessary to make greater efforts in these directions in order to increase their impact. In this respect, both public authorities and private businesses should cooperate in order to provide a coordinated response of town centre management through which the town centre could be better managed and developed.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Cathy Parker, John Byrom, Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Elisa Arrigo and Alessandro Brun

Despite menswear is gaining a significant relevance in terms of retail sales, it represents a neglected topic within the academic literature. Therefore, this paper aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite menswear is gaining a significant relevance in terms of retail sales, it represents a neglected topic within the academic literature. Therefore, this paper aims at providing a better understanding of the formal menswear market by developing a tailor-made classification model for the identification of retailers' clusters and at discovering the critical success factors (CSFs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research looked at most formal high-end menswear retailers in Italy adopting a methodology based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process and multiple case studies. Thirty interviews were conducted with experts, managers and shopkeepers from case studies.

Findings

The study develops for the first time a classification framework of formal high-end menswear retailers and a matching matrix to jointly analyse retailers' clusters and customer profiles in Italy. The results identify the CSFs pursued by menswear retailers and highlight the existence of four clusters of retailers (Differentiated Fashion Firms; Formal Menswear Leaders; Tailoring Firms and Luxury Brands) and seven customer profiles (Habitual Professionals, Special Events, Young People, Occasional Professionals, Foreigners, VIPs and Fashionistas).

Originality/value

The formal high-end menswear represents one of the most traditional Italian heritage markets while being almost ignored in the academic literature. Thus, the value of this research lays in deepening our understanding of this market from the retailers' perspective, by providing for the first time a taxonomy of its players and contributing to identifying the CSFs and the main customer profiles.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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