Search results

1 – 4 of 4
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Leonie V. Still and Cecily D. Guerin

Self‐employment makes an important contribution to a nation′seconomy, women are turning to it in increasing numbers but still facehurdles in their quest for independence…

Abstract

Self‐employment makes an important contribution to a nation′s economy, women are turning to it in increasing numbers but still face hurdles in their quest for independence, autonomy and job satisfaction. An Australian survey by questionnaire (commissioned in Sydney by the New South Wales Women′s Advisory Council) of 357 self‐employed women revealed that they faced three types of barriers: entry, operational and personal. Entry barriers revolved around confidence to start the business, necessary start‐up finance, and adequate sources of assistance and advice. Operational barriers concerned finance, lack of assistance and advice, lack of skills in marketing and finance, and assistance in developing business. Personal problems were sense of isolation, lack of mentors, tutors or counsellors, need for support of other businesses (especially suppliers) and colleagues, managing a home and a business, self‐management, and child care. Recommendations are made for a phased system of support services related to style, stage and needs of individual small business proprietors.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1991

Leonie V. Still and Cecily D. Guerin

In recent years women have made considerable progress in managementand self‐employment. However, there has been little attempt to develop acareer development perspective…

Abstract

In recent years women have made considerable progress in management and self‐employment. However, there has been little attempt to develop a career development perspective of women which may assist their further advance in the workforce or to help them overcome inhibiting factors preventing them from achieving career goals. Two Australian studies suggest that managerial women reveal a number of career patterns depending on whether they are organisationally or entrepreneurially inclined. For instance, organisational (enterprise) women managers can be divided into self‐made and professional groupings, with further distinguishing career patterns. Entrepreneurial/self‐employed women exhibit another variety of career patterns according to the nature of the business entity they have chosen to operate. The results suggest that there is great heterogeneity in the range of managerial careers for women, and that this heterogeneity has more to do with contextual factors than gender‐specific issues.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Career Orientations in Women Volume 44 No. 9 of Human Relations includes an article by Millicent E. Poole, Janice Langan‐Fox and Mary Omodel entitled “Career Orientations…

Abstract

Career Orientations in Women Volume 44 No. 9 of Human Relations includes an article by Millicent E. Poole, Janice Langan‐Fox and Mary Omodel entitled “Career Orientations in Women from Rural and Urban Backgrounds.”

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Leonie V. Still and Cecily Guerin

Networking is increasingly important to women as their careers advance in a wide range of professions and occupations. However, while they are aware of its benefits, an…

Abstract

Networking is increasingly important to women as their careers advance in a wide range of professions and occupations. However, while they are aware of its benefits, an Australian study reveals differences between men and women executives in the way they network. Men emerge as better at networking in the business, professional, and social environments. The study suggests that women could improve their skills by observing male strategies. While women's networks are of great assistance, women could benefit even more if they had more experience in the men's version of the networking game.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

1 – 4 of 4