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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Simon Bridge, Cecilia Hegarty and Sharon Porter

Entrepreneurship can refer to business start‐up, but now sometimes has wider connotations. This paper aims to explore what entrepreneurship means for the promoters of…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship can refer to business start‐up, but now sometimes has wider connotations. This paper aims to explore what entrepreneurship means for the promoters of entrepreneurship education and what might be appropriate for the students who consume it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper assesses the work of NICENT (The Northern Ireland Centre for Entrepreneurship) in the University of Ulster in its approach to addressing the requirements of both its funders and its consumers.

Findings

Funders often want to pursue entrepreneurship as part of a business creation agenda but even the word “entrepreneurship” can be off‐putting to students. NICENT, therefore, asked not “How to teach entrepreneurship?” but “What do students need?” As a result NICENT broadened its approach from “enterprise for new venture creation” to “enterprise for life”. This, NICENT believed, was more appropriate to the needs of the majority of students and was a foundation on which “enterprise for new venture creation” could later be built.

Practical implications

NICENT funders had an economic development focus, and wanted to see new high‐growth businesses. However, to spread entrepreneurship education throughout the university, NICENT had to “sell” its services to university staff and, in turn, to their students: who want respectively to deliver and receive an enhancement to future life and work effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper explores the different requirements of the various stakeholders involved in entrepreneurship education and considers the need to reconcile them.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2008

Cecilia Hegarty and Colin Jones

With the unbridled demand for entrepreneurship in higher education, the purpose of this paper is to identify how pedagogy can inhibit students in making the transition to…

Abstract

Purpose

With the unbridled demand for entrepreneurship in higher education, the purpose of this paper is to identify how pedagogy can inhibit students in making the transition to graduate entrepreneurship. Along the way, the concept of what and who is a graduate entrepreneur is challenged.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports upon the pragmatic development of enterprise programmes in Ireland and Australia. Despite different starting points, a convergence of purpose as to what can be realistically expected of enterprise education has emerged.

Findings

This study reinforces the shift away from commercialisation strategies associated with entrepreneurial action towards developing essential life skills as core to any university programme and key to developing entrepreneurial capacity among students. Despite similar government intervention, university policy and student demand for practical‐based entrepreneurial learning in both cases, graduates tend not to engage in immediate entrepreneurial action due to the lack of fit between their programme of study and individual resource profiles, suggesting that graduate entrepreneurship is more than child's play.

Practical implications

There are practical implications for educationalists forced to consider the effectiveness of their enterprise teachings, and cautionary evidence for those charged with providing support services for graduates.

Originality/value

Given the evolutionary approaches used at the University of Tasmania to develop students as “reasonable adventurers” and at the University of Ulster to develop “the enterprising mindset” the paper presents evidence of the need to allow students the opportunity to apply entrepreneurial learning to their individual life experiences in order to reasonably venture into entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Emma Fleck, Cecilia Hegarty and Helle Neergaard

Against a backdrop of global economic recession, high production costs and increased international competition, the performance, survival and growth of small businesses is…

Abstract

Purpose

Against a backdrop of global economic recession, high production costs and increased international competition, the performance, survival and growth of small businesses is high on the global political agenda. However, like many other nations, Ireland is lagging behind in terms of a co‐ordinated approach to the specific challenge of supporting women‐owned ventures, hence possibly reducing their opportunity to act as economic agents. Based on a review of growth‐oriented support programmes for women in business in Ireland, this short viewpoint seeks to identifiy a number of gaps in the current support system and to propose a range of possible alternative intervention strategies that the authors believe can help facilitate business growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data, a review of the current government support programmes was carried out. Further, evidence obtained through an in‐depth qualitative study of 33 women entrepreneurs in Ireland and Northern Ireland which identified a number of specific barriers inhibiting the development of these firms was used.

Findings

The analysis of current government practices revealed that whilst women are making progress in starting more businesses in Ireland, the current statistics indicate that they still tend to start small and stay small. This points towards a need to reassess and understand the issue of growth among women entrepreneurs and, in doing so, develop new mechanisms that can have real impact on growth‐oriented women‐owned firms whilst also respecting and supporting those who choose not to grow their business. The qualitative study identified a number of specific barriers, which hinder the development of their firms. These included financial, regulatory and employability challenges; a lack of management skills and confidence. Motherhood and personal goals were also found to be inhibiting factors for women entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a number of possible government and personal intervention strategies to overcome the identified barriers. These include encouraging lending within the small growth sectors, conducting a regional skills audit, reducing the administration and paperwork associated with trading and accessing support and develop customised training and up‐skilling designed to meet the specific needs of women entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The paper argues that government agencies in Ireland must now act on the evidence provided and confront the issues affecting women entrepreneurs.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Cecilia Hegarty

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the approach to embedding entrepreneurship within third level education in Northern Ireland by assessing the perceptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the approach to embedding entrepreneurship within third level education in Northern Ireland by assessing the perceptions of lecturers and learners and monitoring the effectiveness of teaching methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys and focus groups were conducted with lecturers and learners from different disciplines as part of a pilot investigation under the Northern Ireland Centre for Entrepreneurship (NICENT) with a view to establishing a longitudinal study.

Findings

Evidence suggests that NICENT has increased interest and positive attitudes towards entrepreneurship in Northern Ireland. E‐learning can meet high demand, intensive programmes are equally effective in improving the skills set. Entrepreneurship education needs sub‐sequential support.

Research limitations/implications

The study provided preliminary findings for entrepreneurship teachings in different disciplines. Further dissecting of lecturer/learner analyses by course/year etc. is possible. Effectiveness could be assessed through graduate behaviours in the future in order to build longitudinal data.

Practical implications

The results prove that lecturers/learners are willing to embrace new subjects (entrepreneurship for scientists) and new teaching methods when blended with traditional approaches. Whilst WebCT environment can facilitate a comfortable action‐learning zone, entrepreneurship education needs personalisation and industry engagement.

Originality/value

The study reports from the developing face within Northern Ireland and provides insightful observations of new subject adoption, the learner's curve and changing cultural attitudes within tertiary education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Cecilia Hegarty and Janet Johnston

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and academic partner institutions charged with training graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are largely qualitative and derived from the experiences of graduates, company supervisors and University of Ulster staff involved in projects during 2001‐2007 when 140 FUSION projects were undertaken across the island of Ireland.

Findings

More job opportunities, changing job values and work ethic impact upon the uptake and success of FUSION projects. Employers, especially within growing SMEs, have adopted a learner‐centred approach in order to maximise the benefits of the project for both the graduate and the company. Graduate development programmes continue to strengthen university‐to‐business links, which in turn ensures graduate output meets the needs of industry.

Research limitations/implications

Data collected throughout the term of FUSION projects are reported; further analyses of stakeholder views post‐project completion would provide further insight into the longer‐term effects of graduate training upon career progression.

Practical implications

This analysis proffers graduate reflections on “work‐based learning”. It serves key reminders for evaluating satisfaction with graduate development programmes presenting two key implications, pathways for better preparing graduates/SMEs and routes for enhancing the benefits of such projects.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on research that seeks to enhance graduate training and placement experiences within SMEs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Hilda Cecilia Martínez León

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the challenges academics face today in developing a knowledge-based economy. In response to these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the challenges academics face today in developing a knowledge-based economy. In response to these challenges, the authors developed a collaborative approach to enhancing the learning experience for engineering management (or industrial engineering) capstone design courses. The core of this approach is the problem-based learning through the execution of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) projects implemented via university–industry partnerships. The ultimate goal of this approach is to facilitate the integration and application of theoretical knowledge while promoting the development of professional skills in undergraduate students as demanded by business organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is firmly grounded in theory and methods from project management and quality management, and LSS literature and was tested in an engineering and management capstone design course at the author’s university. The case study presented here offers a detailed analysis of the design and implementation of the proposed framework. The authors also present the results of a survey conducted to assess the extent to which the proposed approach contributes to bridging the gap between theory and practice.

Findings

Results from the pilot implementation and survey results revealed that students who took the enhanced LSS capstone course felt that their projects helped them gain a better understanding on how to apply the theory to practical situations while preparing them to approach and solve problems in real-world settings confidentially. The authors also found that the LSS green belt certification helped recent graduates to transition to the workforce more easily, gain more credibility among coworkers and supervisors and make contributions quicker than other new hires, get the job they wanted faster and overall advance in their careers.

Originality/value

The framework is a composition of best practices used in a variety of universities and industries. While the majority of the LSS university-based programs are typically offered at the graduate level and with limited (support for) project executions, the framework proposed here provides the infrastructure for solid company staff-student team collaborations on projects executed from inception to implementation.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Andrei Bonamigo, Brenda Dettmann, Camila Guimarães Frech and Steffan Macali Werner

The purpose of this study is to recognize the facilitators and inhibitors of value co-creation in the industrial service environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to recognize the facilitators and inhibitors of value co-creation in the industrial service environment.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a systematic literature review (SLR) based on the systematic search flow (SSF) method was conducted, using six databases. Then, the content analysis proposed by Bardin (2011) was used to analyze the selected papers from SLR.

Findings

The authors identified a total of 11 facilitators and four inhibitors of value co-creation in industrial services. The findings show that concerning facilitators, the involvement of actors and synergy among participants reported a higher presence. As for the inhibitors, incompatibility among actors and actors' inexperience in the context of value co-creation were the ones that registered the most frequency.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the SLR covered a large proportion of the studies available, this research may not have enabled a complete coverage of all existing peer-reviewed papers in the field of value co-creation in industrial services.

Practical implications

This study assists managers in enhancing the performance of the value co-creation process. This is because, by knowing both the facilitators and inhibitors, managers can have an improved understanding of this process, thereby pondering these elements on the elaboration of their strategies and decision-making.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to recognize both the facilitators and inhibitors of value co-creation in industrial services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Cecilia Dalborg

The purpose of this paper is to investigate women-owned businesses from a life cycle perspective and with a qualitative growth approach. Building on previous research that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate women-owned businesses from a life cycle perspective and with a qualitative growth approach. Building on previous research that has identified qualitative growth platforms, this paper takes into account the time aspect and investigates perceived barriers and support needs inside different qualitative growth platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in Sweden and is based on 191 women entrepreneurs in a first survey and 101 women entrepreneurs in a follow-up questionnaire three years later. To answer the research questions, descriptive frequency analysis and logistic regression analysis techniques have been used.

Findings

The motivation of growth changes throughout the life cycle, and women entrepreneurs move between different qualitative growth platforms when required building blocks of previous platforms have been established and secured. In this transfer of growth ambition, a significant correlation between business age and intrinsic growth aspiration was identified. Initially, growth is extrinsically motivated and later on in the life cycle, it is intrinsically motivated. In the late life cycle, the motivation is extrinsically motivated again. The results discern barriers to growth that hinder movement from extrinsic to intrinsic business platforms, and the author argues that the transfer of growth ambition from one growing platform to another requires different types of advice and support from the surrounding community.

Research limitations/implications

By broadening the view of growth to include both a quantitative and qualitative approach, it is possible to identify a widespread growth ambition in women-owned businesses which experience various barriers and supportive needs. Business programs that encourage exchange of experience among entrepreneurs in various growth platforms might be a way to overcome the perceived barriers. As women’s businesses only receive a low proportion of the government funding, they are prevented from developing their growth ambitions. To ensure that all forms of growth are stimulated, different measures are required depending on which stage in their life cycle the women-owned businesses belong to.

Originality/value

By considering business growth from a qualitative perspective, barriers and needs that the traditional approach may overlook can be highlighted. For example, growth aspiration in terms of more employees will not be considered until the previously, qualitative growth platforms are established and secured. The support system, however, is designed to only favor growth in terms of employment, which results in difficulties to qualify for financial support.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Cecilia Dalborg, Yvonne von Friedrichs and Joakim Wincent

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the growth of women's businesses from a qualitative perspective. The paper identifies strategic building blocks for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the growth of women's businesses from a qualitative perspective. The paper identifies strategic building blocks for defining a set of different growth platforms. Moreover, the paper investigates growth ambitions for women inside each identified “type” of growth platform and identifies critical motivation variables that can influence the decision to move from growing one business platform to growing another platform.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on 191 women entrepreneurs. Data were analyzed by coding narrative statements from the survey into overarching themes for business platforms, descriptive frequency analysis and logistic regression analysis techniques.

Findings

The paper discerned five different growth platforms and noticed intrinsic or extrinsic growth ambitions for platform growth. The extrinsic platforms are the most common, but all platforms can be characterized by equally high growth aspirations. Each of the identified platforms is associated with distinct and unique blocks that the women entrepreneurs try to put together and resolve in order to grow their companies. Women entrepreneurs move between the different platforms when the building blocks of previous platforms have been established and secured. Variables such as profits and ownership may explain such transfers of growth ambitions.

Research limitations/implications

While acknowledging the qualitative growth of business platforms, the paper takes an approach that goes against the traditional view of quantitative growth.

Originality/value

This study is a response to the lack of research on qualitative growth and women's entrepreneurship and suggests that the manifested qualitative growth can be in order to secure blocks on different business platforms.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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