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1 – 10 of 16
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Heleen Buldeo Rai, Sara Verlinde and Cathy Macharis

Currently, it is unclear how omnichannel retailers can create a last mile offer that is both attractive and sustainable from an economic and environmental point of view…

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Abstract

Purpose

Currently, it is unclear how omnichannel retailers can create a last mile offer that is both attractive and sustainable from an economic and environmental point of view. The purpose of this paper is to explore to which extent consumers are willing to adopt last mile options that are more sustainable and how these options should be composed to remain attractive.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, the authors surveyed a representative sample of Belgian consumers, using choice-based conjoint experiments, and analysed their preferences structures.

Findings

Consumers’ preference goes out to free, next day delivery to an address of choice, on regular office hours during the week. However, when free delivery and return are offered, consumers are willing to collect their orders themselves or wait longer for their orders to arrive.

Practical implications

The research findings are important for retailers that (plan to) operate an omnichannel model. For omnichannel retailers with a dense store network, the results indicate that consumers accept their store network as pick-up and return locations, allowing retailers to create a more efficient and sustainable supply chain in which their online and offline activities can be combined.

Originality/value

The research findings contribute to current literature and practice by combining “planet” and “profit” components of sustainability in last mile transport and applying it in the novel omnichannel environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2019

Heleen Buldeo Rai, Sara Verlinde, Cathy Macharis, Penelope Schoutteet and Lieselot Vanhaverbeke

The purpose of this paper is to identify in what way logistics service providers are involved in the logistics operations of omnichannel retailers. Given the importance of…

3723

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify in what way logistics service providers are involved in the logistics operations of omnichannel retailers. Given the importance of logistics in omnichannel retail and the complexities that it brings forth, it is unclear if the current tendency towards logistics outsourcing continues, and how logistics service providers should adapt to remain relevant in the omnichannel retail environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on both desk and field research. The authors analysed the scientific information available on omnichannel retail logistics and conducted semi-structured expert interviews with food and non-food retailers that adopt an omnichannel model.

Findings

The research demonstrates distinct differences between food and non-food retailers. While food retailers are inclined to organise fulfilment and last mile activities in-house, non-food retailers partner closely with logistics service providers. Nonetheless, the store network of non-food retailers is attracting a growing part of logistics activities, which retailers are building themselves. To sustain their relevance in the omnichannel environment and strengthen their position for the future, the authors created a competency recommendation framework for logistics service providers, in which service differentiation is proposed as a viable direction for growth.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on insights from retailers based in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium) and requires further and wider testing in other contexts and geographical areas.

Practical implications

The findings have strategic importance for retailers that are developing an omnichannel retail model and logistics service providers that (aim to) serve clients and operate activities within the retail sector.

Originality/value

The research provides a holistic view of logistics in omnichannel retail by identifying insourcing and outsourcing mechanisms and developing competency recommendations to fulfilment, internal transport and last mile transport in omnichannel retail.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Dries Meers, Tom Vermeiren and Cathy Macharis

In the last two decades, different policy initiatives have been set up to increase the share of intermodal freight transport through a modal shift. In the design of these…

Abstract

Purpose

In the last two decades, different policy initiatives have been set up to increase the share of intermodal freight transport through a modal shift. In the design of these policies, often critical break-even distances are set, showing the cost or price competitiveness of intermodal transport to delineate transport routes that qualify for such a modal shift. In this chapter, we discuss to which extent such break-even distances can be generalized on a larger scale and how they are calculated.

Methodology

We use two price-based models to calculate break-even distances for an intermodal rail and an intermodal barge transport case. General break-even values do not show the price variation in the transport market and vagueness in the calculation of these values adds to this problem.

Findings

We find that for the inland waterway case, intermodal barge transport shows potential on shorter distances as well. In addition, different ways to lower the break-even distance are discussed and a framework for calculating break-even distances is suggested.

Research limitations

The research elaborates on break-even distances in a European context using price data which are fluctuating over time, location specific and often not publicly available.

Practical implications

Policy initiatives promoting intermodal transport should not focus solely on long distance transport. Moreover, evaluating the competitiveness of the intermodal sector solely on a price comparison dishonours its true potential.

Originality/value

This chapter challenges the current European policy on intermodal transport by showing the price competitiveness of intermodal transport in two cases.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Arne Höltl, Matthias Heinrichs and Cathy Macharis

This study analyses the effect of fuel efficiency increase on travel demand in the city of Berlin. Vehicle technologies such as advanced driver assistance systems can help…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the effect of fuel efficiency increase on travel demand in the city of Berlin. Vehicle technologies such as advanced driver assistance systems can help drivers to save fuel and thus lower exhaust emissions on a network level. In order to obtain high political endorsement among different stakeholders, the analysis of such effects which have an impact on overall fuel and emission savings are highly relevant. Recent testing of so called advanced driver assistance systems showed their ability to reduce fuel consumption and lower traffic emissions by giving driving recommendations to drivers.

Methodology/approach

Two effects on driving were simulated using a travel demand model: the increase in fuel prices which will take place in the coming years and a possible increase in vehicle fuel efficiency. Comparing these scenarios allowed us to calculate the effect of price change and the rebound effect of fuel efficiency gains using standard methods for transport elasticities. The simulation was run with the travel demand model TAPAS and the city of Berlin was the network used as a case study.

Findings

As fuel prices increase over time, driving tends to decrease. Driving increases, however, if vehicles become more fuel efficient and the result is the observed rebound effect. On a city network level, this also translates to lower emission savings than expected from the vehicle fuel efficiency gains. The rebound effect which we estimated matches similar findings in the literature, specifically in terms of their magnitude.

Practical implications

We used a simulation to compare scenarios of city travel demand. The result allowed us to estimate changes to the desired variables of fuel efficiency and fuel prices. For those interested in the effects of vehicle efficiency gains on city level these results are highly recommended for consideration.

Originality/value

The proposed framework for analysing rebound effects helped to assess the impacts of energy efficiency technologies on a city level.

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Charles D'Haene, Sara Verlinde and Cathy Macharis

Raising standards are leading humanitarians to become increasingly interested in measuring the performance of their supply chain. A few researchers have addressed this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Raising standards are leading humanitarians to become increasingly interested in measuring the performance of their supply chain. A few researchers have addressed this topic, building on classical measurement theories and trying to identify the salient features of the humanitarian sector. This young body of literature must now be tested against current practice. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The practitioners’ perspective is explored through a multiple case study, based on qualitative evidence, within three major humanitarian organizations. Results are discussed using a situation-actor-process – learning-action-performance model of inquiry. Preceding this investigation, a literature review delves into research on humanitarian supply chain performance measurement and presents the most relevant pieces in a general framework.

Findings

Humanitarians have elaborated measures whose essential focus is laid on service level. The more comprehensive approach advocated by researchers has received some consideration but is still poorly implemented. An issue that is given more priority by humanitarians is the accelerated supply chain integration they are going through.

Originality/value

In addition to an unprecedented literature review, this paper offers a comparative study of humanitarian organizations’ practices in the field of supply chain performance measurement. Humanitarian procurement centres, virtually ignored in literature until now, are scrutinized at a turning point of their evolution.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Tom van Lier, Astrid De Witte, Olivier Mairesse, Joachim Hollevoet, Dimokritos Kavadias and Cathy Macharis

– The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the social relevance of school transport in Flanders, Belgium, by using a social cost-benefit analysis (SCBA).

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the social relevance of school transport in Flanders, Belgium, by using a social cost-benefit analysis (SCBA).

Design/methodology/approach

The use of a SCBA already showed to be an appropriate tool for the appraisal of transport projects as it generates a large amount of information on the investment and its return for society.

Findings

This paper clearly shows that organizing school transport is socially relevant, using a SCBA as a tool for evaluation. The analysis also provides insight in potential ways for improving school transport organization and financing and allows assessing whether further gains for society are possible. It reveals that the budget granted for the obligatory organization of school transport is not sufficient and that schools are generally forced to use part of their educational budget to be able to organize the (socially relevant) school transport.

Practical implications

Findings from this study can assist schools and organizers of school transport in improving their organization. It demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of the investment.

Originality/value

Not many socio-economic evaluations of school transport have been done in literature. This study supports the use of SCBA within this context, further developing its use to answer similar research questions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

1 – 10 of 16