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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tammi Walker, Jenny Shaw, Lea Hamilton, Clive Turpin, Catherine Reid and Kathryn Abel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14 prison staff in three English prisons were interviewed to examine the strategies currently used by them to support imprisoned women who self-harm.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to identify three key themes: “developing a relationship”, “self-help strategies” and “relational interventions”.

Findings

Many staff expressed some dissatisfaction in the techniques available to support the women, and felt their utility can be restricted by the prison regime.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that there is currently a deficit in the provision of training and support for prison staff, who are expected to fulfil a dual role as both custodian and carer of imprisoned women. Further research into prison staff’s perception of the training currently available could highlight gaps between current theory and practice in the management of self-harm and thus indicate content for future training programmes. Research exploring the impact of working with imprisoned women who self-harm is suggested to identify strategies for supporting staff. It must be acknowledged that this is a small-scale qualitative study and the findings are from only three prisons and may not apply to staff in other settings.

Originality/value

Currently few studies have focussed on the perspective of prison staff. This study is one of very few studies which focusses on the techniques and resources available to support the women, from the perspective of the prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Gordon McCrae

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Eric Emerson

– The purpose of this paper is to discuss how research can support a renewed focus on the promotion of independence and the prevention of avoidable dependency.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how research can support a renewed focus on the promotion of independence and the prevention of avoidable dependency.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative review and discussion.

Findings

Generating practice-based evidence, exploiting the possibilities of existing administrative data and learning from the world of public health may offer some ways forward.

Originality/value

Potential priorities for future research are identified.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Richard Parrott and Peter McGill

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Valentina Iemmi, Martin Knapp, Caroline Reid, Catherine Sholl, Monique Ferdinand, Ariane Buescher and Marija Trachtenberg

Positive behavioural support has been considered as a valuable alternative to residential care for children and adolescents with learning disabilities and behaviour that…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive behavioural support has been considered as a valuable alternative to residential care for children and adolescents with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges. While recent evidence suggests it has a positive impact on behaviour and carer ability to cope, there is little evidence of its economic costs or benefits. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the cost of providing positive behavioural support to ten children and adolescents with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges living in the community in Ealing, West London. Comparison was also made with the cost estimate of possible alternative support packages for children and adolescents with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges in the UK, as obtained through a Delphi exercise.

Findings

Total cost of services per child was £1,454 per week for young people supported short-term, and £1,402 supported long-term. Children and adolescents were making use of a range of social care, education and health services. Over the full sample, half of the total cost was accounted for by education services. The Delphi exercise estimated the weekly cost of residential-based care as more expensive than the cost of community-based care for children and adolescents with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges. At the end of the ITSBS, all ten children and adolescents initially at risk of imminent residential placement were living in the community with less service-intensive and less expensive support. This suggests that avoiding residential-based care could reduce costs in the long term.

Originality/value

Positive behavioural support has potential to support people with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges in the community, leading to potential cost advantages. However, this is a small study and more robust research is needed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Heather Dilks-Hopper, Chloe Jacobs, Catherine Sholl, Caroline Falconer and Nick Gore

The purpose of this paper is to present an update on the Ealing Intensive Therapeutic and Short Breaks Service (ITSBS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an update on the Ealing Intensive Therapeutic and Short Breaks Service (ITSBS).

Design/methodology/approach

The challenges the service has faced are reviewed, including the service’s response to those challenges. Also provided is a more detailed analysis of the outcomes of the service.

Findings

The ITSBS continues to succeed in supporting young people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour to stay at home with their families.

Originality/value

Despite considerable challenges and adaptations to the model, the ITSBS is still achieving successful outcomes for vulnerable young people and is considered nationally to be a best-practice model. Few prior articles have provided an account of how innovative service models are maintained and evolve over time.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Catherine N. Axinn

Managers' perceptions of exporting are shown to have a critical influence on firm export performance in this study of machine tool manufacturers in the US and Canada. Of…

Abstract

Managers' perceptions of exporting are shown to have a critical influence on firm export performance in this study of machine tool manufacturers in the US and Canada. Of special importance are managers' perceptions of the advantages of exporting over domestic sales, especially perceptions of export‐related growth opportunities. Perceptions of the complexities associated with exporting and managers' work experience overseas are also shown to be related to the percentage of sales a firm obtains by exporting. Possible explanations of these findings are suggested and several implications are discussed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Catherine Sarah Sholl

The purpose of this paper is to consider the needs of children and young people with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism and challenging behaviour including those with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the needs of children and young people with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism and challenging behaviour including those with mental health difficulties in the light of the article “A reflective evaluation of the Bradford Positive Behaviour Support – In Reach Service”.

Design/methodology/approach

The author’s reflections on experiences of working with this cohort as a clinician and manager are presented in this paper. Also, this paper presents the following: consideration of recent policy, guidance and literature associated with the provision of support to children and young people with ID or autism at risk of residential placement or hospital admission; reflection on gaps in research and practice in how to best support this group of children, young people and families with complex and diverse needs.

Findings

The success of the Bradford and other similar services is discussed along with a reflection about the benefits and potential gaps in Positive Behavioural Support services working to meet the needs of this group of children and young people, and their families.

Originality/value

The importance of areas providing more consistent and high quality multi-agency early preventative support and intensive support for those in crisis is discussed. The need for further research and development of ways of working with this cohort, including harder to reach young people and families, is discussed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Lisa Kervin, Annette Woods, Barbara Comber and Aspa Baroutsis

The structures, procedures and relationships within schools both constrain and enable the ways that children and teachers can engage with the everyday ‘business’ of…

Abstract

The structures, procedures and relationships within schools both constrain and enable the ways that children and teachers can engage with the everyday ‘business’ of literacy learning. In schools and classrooms, the resources available to children, the spaces in which they work and how adults interact with them are often decided upon by others, including their teachers. In this chapter, we focus specifically on access to mobile digital resources and important spaces in the school, arguing that opportunities for children to be critical consumers and producers of text can be provided when children are afforded some control of decisions about how, where and when people, materials, tools and texts are used. Drawing from data collected as part of a larger study of learning to write in the early years of schooling, at two different schools in different Australian states, we examine two cases of ‘disruption’ negotiated by children and their teachers. We explore the potential of mobile technologies in children’s hands as key elements in changing the socio-spatial power relations around text production that usually hold in schools. These instances are explicit opportunities to study what is possible when young children and teachers work to change children’s relationships to materials, spaces and people in productive and provocative ways. We analyse the digital texts produced and the work of teachers and children to foreground digital literacies as a way to influence what goes on in their schools.

Details

Mobile Technologies in Children’s Language and Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-879-6

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