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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Catherine Hungerford and Patricia Kench

Recovery approaches to healthcare are now an important feature of the mental health policies and plans of many western countries. However, there are continuing challenges to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery approaches to healthcare are now an important feature of the mental health policies and plans of many western countries. However, there are continuing challenges to the operationalisation of these approaches. The purpose of this paper is to consider how to overcome these challenges, using insights gained from health managers and practitioners who have been involved in the process of implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is undertaken through a descriptive single-case embedded study of the implementation of Recovery into a public mental health service in Australia. The unit of analysis that features in this paper is the perceptions of the implementation of Recovery-oriented services, of health managers and practitioners.

Findings

The analysis suggests that although health service managers followed many of the recommendations that can be found in the research literature to support achievement of Recovery-oriented services, there was a need to go further. For example, practitioners in the case study context were educated about the principles of Recovery and provided with new processes of clinical documentation to support their work, however these practitioners felt they were ill-equipped to address complex issues of practice, including the management of clinical risk and professional accountability issues. This raises questions about the content of the education and training provided, and also about the ongoing support provided to practitioners who work within a Recovery-oriented framework.

Originality/value

The descriptive single-case embedded study of the implementation of Recovery is the first of its kind in Australia. Findings of the study provide insight for other health service organisations committed to effectively implementing Recovery-oriented services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Catherine Hungerford and Donna Hodgson

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of a review of a unique program that has helped to address workforce needs and support Registered Nurses (RNs) working in a public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of a review of a unique program that has helped to address workforce needs and support Registered Nurses (RNs) working in a public mental health service in Australia. RNs are employed, facilitated to gain clinical experience in diverse mental health settings, and funded to study a graduate diploma in mental health nursing. Upon completion, there is no obligation to continue working for the health service, but most RNs have chosen to do so.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was taken to review the Program, using the focus group method of data collection. Past and present Program participants, and also their mentors and managers, were interviewed about the Program's benefits and challenges.

Findings

The findings highlight the many successes of the Program and also suggest areas for development. One of these is the need to examine the curriculum content of the graduate diploma and consider requirements around clinical experience. Another area of concern is the “us/them” culture identified, which involves RNs who have no postgraduate tertiary qualifications marginalising RNs undertaking further study. Such a culture has the potential to undermine the profession locally and also more broadly.

Originality/value

Findings of the review provide valuable insights for other health services and also academic providers who seek to address ongoing workforce issues related to mental health nursing.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2013

Abstract

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-190288-2

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

C.M. Woolgar

A suite of databases designed to provide a guide to archive collections, detailed descriptions of some major holdings and surveys of holdings elsewhere, has been developed at the…

Abstract

A suite of databases designed to provide a guide to archive collections, detailed descriptions of some major holdings and surveys of holdings elsewhere, has been developed at the University of Southampton Library since 1983. The databases are mounted using STATUS. Future development paths for archive systems are discussed.

Details

Program, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Chris Todd

This paper takes a chronological approach to the cataloguing of electronic resources within the National Library of New Zealand. It briefly outlines the early work in this area…

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Abstract

This paper takes a chronological approach to the cataloguing of electronic resources within the National Library of New Zealand. It briefly outlines the early work in this area and then looks at how the role of a national library affects the cataloguing process. This is followed by a description of current approaches to cataloguing published digital materials and the transformation of the catalogue record that has been part of this process. Finally some issues that are still under discussion are outlined.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Bert Chapman

Once a year a reference source is published in Surrey, England, that brings visitors such as the military attachés from the Chinese and former Soviet embassies in London to…

Abstract

Once a year a reference source is published in Surrey, England, that brings visitors such as the military attachés from the Chinese and former Soviet embassies in London to Surrey. The source these individuals and organizations are so eager to obtain is Jane's Fighting Ships (JFS), an annual naval compendium which has summarized international naval trends and developments for nearly a century.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1900

A pæan of joy and triumph which speaks for itself, and which is a very true indication of how the question of poisonous adulteration is viewed by certain sections of “the trade,”…

Abstract

A pæan of joy and triumph which speaks for itself, and which is a very true indication of how the question of poisonous adulteration is viewed by certain sections of “the trade,” and by certain of the smaller and irresponsible trade organs, has appeared in print. It would seem that the thanks of “the trade” are due to the defendants in the case heard at the Liverpool Police Court for having obtained an official acknowledgment that the use of salicylic acid and of other preservatives, even in large amounts, in wines and suchlike articles, is not only allowable, but is really necessary for the proper keeping of the product. It must have been a charming change in the general proceedings at the Liverpool Court to listen to a “preservatives” case conducted before a magistrate who evidently realises that manufacturers, in these days, in order to make a “decent” profit, have to use the cheapest materials they can buy, and cannot afford to pick and choose; and that they have therefore “been compelled” to put preservatives into their articles so as to prevent their going bad. He was evidently not to be misled by the usual statement that such substances should not be used because they are injurious to health— as though that could be thought to have anything to do with the much more important fact that the public “really want” to have an article supplied to them which is cheap, and yet keeps well. Besides, many doctors and professors were brought forward to prove that they had never known a case of fatal poisoning due to the use of salicylic acid as a preservative. Unfortunately, it is only the big firms that can manage to bring forward such admirable and learned witnesses, and the smaller firms have to suffer persecution by faddists and others who attempt to obtain the public notice by pretending to be solicitous about the public health. Altogether the prosecution did not have a pleasant time, for the magistrate showed his appreciation of the evidence of one of the witnesses by humorously rallying him about his experiments with kittens, as though any‐one could presume to judge from experiments on brute beasts what would be the effect on human beings—the “lords of creation.” Everyone reading the evidence will be struck by the fact that the defendant stated that he had once tried to brew without preservatives, but with the only result that the entire lot “went bad.” All manufacturers of his own type will sympathise with him, since, of course, there is no practicable way of getting over this trouble except by the use of preservatives; although the above‐mentioned faddists are so unkind as to state that if everything is clean the article will keep. But this must surely be sheer theory, for it cannot be supposed that there can be any manufacturer of this class of article who would be foolish enough to think he could run his business at a profit, and yet go to all the expense of having the returned empties washed out before refilling, and of paying the heavy price asked for the best crude materials, when he has to compete with rival firms, who can use practically anything, and yet turn out an article equal in every way from a selling point of view, and one that will keep sufficiently, by the simple (and cheap) expedient of throwing theory on one side, and by pinning their faith to a preservative which has now received the approval of a magistrate. Manufacturers who use preservatives, whether they are makers of wines or are dairymen, and all similar tradesmen, should join together to protect their interests, for, as they must all admit, “the welfare of the trade” is the chief thing they have to consider, and any other interest must come second, if it is to come in at all. Now is the time for action, for the Commission appointed to inquire into the use of preservatives in foods has not yet given its decision, and there is still time for a properly‐conducted campaign, backed up by those “influential members of the trade” of whom we hear so much, and aided by such far‐reaching and brilliant magisterial decisions, to force these opinions prominently forward, in spite of the prejudice of the public; and to insure to the trades interested the unfettered use of preservatives,—which save “the trade” hundreds of thousands of pounds every year, by enabling the manufacturers to dispense with heavily‐priced apparatus, with extra workmen and with the use of expensive materials,—and which are urgently asked for by the public,—since we all prefer to have our foods drugged than to have them pure.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Nicole Sintov, Ellen Dux, Agassi Tran and Michael Orosz

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the impact of a competition-based intervention combining high-resolution electricity feedback, incentives, information and prompts on…

1126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the impact of a competition-based intervention combining high-resolution electricity feedback, incentives, information and prompts on college dormitory residents’ energy consumption and participation in demand response events. The authors also investigated changes in individual-level pro-environmental behaviors and examined psychosocial correlates of behavior change.

Design/methodology/approach

Residents of 39 suites in a freshman residence hall competed against one another to reduce energy consumption and win prizes as part of a three-week competition. Feedback was provided in near real-time at the suite-level via an interactive touch-screen kiosk. Participants also completed baseline and follow-up surveys.

Findings

Electricity use among all suites was approximately 6.4 per cent lower during the competition period compared to baseline, a significant reduction. Additionally, participants reported engaging in various pro-environmental behaviors significantly more frequently during the competition relative to baseline. Changes in pro-environmental behavior were associated with changes in level of group identification and perceived social norms.

Practical implications

In three weeks, dormitory residents saved 3,158 kWh of electricity compared to baseline – the equivalent of more than 3,470 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions. The findings provide evidence that real-time feedback, combined with incentives, information and prompts, can motivate on-campus residents to reduce energy consumption.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to a limited body of evidence supporting the effectiveness of dorm energy competitions in motivating college students to save energy. In addition, the authors identified individual-level behavioral and psychosocial changes made during such an intervention. University residential life planners may also use the results of this research to inform student programming.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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