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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Catherine Franc and Annie Morton

We have been applying inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodologies to language teaching in the department of French studies at the University of Manchester (UK) since 2006…

Abstract

We have been applying inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodologies to language teaching in the department of French studies at the University of Manchester (UK) since 2006. We were aware that IBL was successfully employed within scientific subjects such as medicine and dentistry, but little research had been carried out within higher education in the adoption of such methodologies in advanced level language learning. Our projects in grammar, phonetics, interpreting and in producing resources for students on their period of residence abroad have not been without their challenges and we have experienced some reticence from students and educators alike. This chapter will set out a rationale for the adoption of IBL methodologies in language provision, detail the projects undertaken and analyse their results in terms of both measurable ‘product’ and perceived ‘process’-based outcomes. Finally, we will examine the dovetailing of competencies enhanced by IBL with those promoted more generally through language learning, a combination which we believe rends our students highly employable in the global jobs market.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Patrick Blessinger and John M. Carfora

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to strengthen the…

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to strengthen the interconnections between teaching, learning, and research within the arts, humanities, and social sciences. This chapter provides a synthesis and analysis of all the chapters in the volume, which present a range of perspectives, case studies, and empirical research on how IBL is being used across a range of courses across a range of institutions within the arts, humanities, and social sciences. The chapter argues that the IBL approach has great potential to enhance and transform teaching and learning. Given the growing demands placed on education to meet a diverse range of complex political, economic, and social problems and personal needs, this chapter argues that education should serve as an incubator where students are part of a learning community and where they are encouraged to grow cognitively, emotionally, and socially by taking increasing responsibility for their own learning.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Abstract

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Taxing the Hard-to-tax: Lessons from Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-828-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Glyn Davies and Roy Davies

This is the second part of a detailed annotated chronology of significant events in the history of money in the context of social, economic, political and technological…

Abstract

This is the second part of a detailed annotated chronology of significant events in the history of money in the context of social, economic, political and technological developments from the dawn of civilization until the closing years of the twentieth century. Part 2 covers events from the start of the industrial revolution onwards. This period saw major changes in the relative importance of coinage, paper money and bank money, as well as the beginnings of electronic money. These changes, and the financial effects of the Napoleonic and World Wars, the rise and decline of the British Empire, the emergence of the United States and Japan, decolonisation and Third World debt, and moves towards a single currency in Europe, are all covered.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

John Martyn

From time to time in the information and library world, something comes along in the way of a new idea or a new piece of technology which we feel is likely to have a…

Abstract

From time to time in the information and library world, something comes along in the way of a new idea or a new piece of technology which we feel is likely to have a significant effect on the way we do things in our professional lives. During the last fifteen years or so, the new developments have included post‐coordinate indexing systems, electrostatic copiers, the use of computers in batch mode, citation indexing, computer typesetting, on‐line search of remotely‐stored data bases, the growth of networks, The National Lending Library at Boston Spa, routine use of microforms, the British Library, and so on. There are usually a few new things either just on the scene or lurking below the horizon, like microprocessors, word processing equipment, Public Lending Right, possible new copyright legislation, the European Patents Office and possibly Euronet, which cause us to worry, perhaps, or to want to find out more about them. Finding out about any of these things, though, hasn't been too much of a problem, because we have been able to do a conventional literature search through the scholarly and professional journals, or through Government publications, and get by these means a pretty good idea of what has been going on. What I am going to talk about tonight though, Prestel, isn't really like that at all. For one thing, most of the publication about it has been in the popular press, in the shape of new announcements and press releases, with very little in the conventional journals (apart from one or two papers in the electronics and electrical press). For another thing, it seems to have come upon us relatively rapidly, even though, paradoxically, its promised public advent has been beset by a variety of delays. Then too, whereas other technological advances have appeared in different areas of human activity and have gradually infiltrated into the information and library world, here we have a radically new type of information supplying service which suddenly appears more or less full‐grown in our world from a possibly unexpected quarter. And, of course, the creature changed its name from Viewdata to Prestel not very long ago, which has not greatly helped our confusion.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Catherine Fletcher

A comparison of state‐regulated provision of continuing vocationaltraining in France with the voluntarist British model highlightsBritain′s poor record in the 1980s and…

Abstract

A comparison of state‐regulated provision of continuing vocational training in France with the voluntarist British model highlights Britain′s poor record in the 1980s and 1990s. The widespread well‐financed training culture in France contrasts with piecemeal provision in Britain where TECs have little room for manoeuvre. The FORCE programme encourages innovation and good practice in ongoing training in the workplace throughout the European Union but there is no move towards legislating for compulsory training rights, which would benefit British workers as levelling up would take place. Europe needs a coordinated training policy, to maintain competitiveness as its industrial base becomes increasingly service‐dominated.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 95 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Mark C. Goniwiecha and David A. Hales

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations…

Abstract

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations ago, are rediscovering their roots and are enrolling in foreign language classes, taking up folk dancing, learning ethnic cuisine, tracing their genealogical pedigrees, and returning to the religious traditions their parents may or may not have passed on to them. Now it's “in” to be ethnic.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Warwick J. McKibbin

Abstract

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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