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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Catherine Bliss

This chapter explores the rise in genetic approaches to health disparities at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the rise in genetic approaches to health disparities at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Methodology/approach

Analysis of public health policies, genome project records, ethnography of project leaders and leading genetic epidemiologists, and news coverage of international projects demonstrates how the study of health disparities and genetic causes of health simultaneously took hold just as the new field of genomics and matters of racial inequality became a global priority for biomedical science and public health.

Findings

As the U.S. federal government created policies to implement racial inclusion standards, international genome projects seized the study race, and diseases that exhibit disparities by race. Genomic leaders made health disparities research a central feature of their science. However, recent attempts to move toward analysis of gene-environment interactions in health and disease have proven insufficient in addressing sociological contributors to health disparities. In place of in-depth analyses of environmental causes, pharmacogenomics drugs, diagnostics, and inclusion in sequencing projects have become the frontline solutions to health disparities.

Originality/value

The chapter argues that genetic forms of medicalization and racialization have taken hold over science and public health around the world, thereby engendering a divestment from sociological approaches that do not align with the expansion of genomic science. The chapter thus contributes to critical discussions in the social and health sciences about the fundamental processes of medicalization, racialization, and geneticization in contemporary society.

Details

Genetics, Health and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-581-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Hilary Landorf and Catherine Wadley

The purpose of this article is to uncover the importance and relevance of John Dewey's philosophy for the key processes, purpose and practices of global learning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to uncover the importance and relevance of John Dewey's philosophy for the key processes, purpose and practices of global learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative historical methodology to analyze John Dewey's education philosophy and its relevance to the theory, practice and purpose of global learning. The study accomplished this analysis through an in-depth examination of the Deweyan concepts of a quality educative experience and reflective thinking, and their applications to global learning in K-16 education.

Findings

Through a careful analysis of Dewey's definition, explanation and examples of a quality educative experience and reflective thinking, the authors find that Deweyan education philosophy offers a comprehensive conceptual framework that ties together the concepts and definitions of global learning and provide a solid foundation for its essential processes, practices and purpose.

Practical implications

Implications of this research include the awareness of Dewey's influence in teaching and learning for an increasingly interconnected world and the use of Deweyan philosophy as a basis for global learning innovations throughout the K-16 curriculum and co-curriculum.

Originality/value

In this article, the authors uncover the work of John Dewey's education philosophy and vision of learning to highlight its relevance to global learning. Through a careful analysis of Dewey's definition, explanations and examples of a quality educative experience and reflective thinking, the authors find that Deweyan education philosophy offers a comprehensive conceptual framework that ties together the concepts and definitions of global learning and provides a solid foundation for its essential processes, practices and purpose.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Abstract

Details

Genetics, Health and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-581-4

Abstract

Details

Genetics, Health and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-581-4

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Duncan Smith

In a recent RQ column, Sharon L. Baker reviewed the profession's literature in the area of readers' advisory services. She found that very little research existed in the…

Abstract

In a recent RQ column, Sharon L. Baker reviewed the profession's literature in the area of readers' advisory services. She found that very little research existed in the area of readers' advisory services. The research that does exist is focused on “passive” readers' advisory strategies. Baker is a leader in this area and her articles on overload and browsing, the use of displays, and genre classification are essential to understanding the adult fiction reader and ways in which libraries can assist these individuals in locating new authors and titles of interest.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Catherine M. Daily and Dan R. Dalton

138

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Catherine Harbor

This paper aims to explore the nature of the marketing of concerts 1672–1749 examining innovations in the promotion and commodification of music, which are witness to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature of the marketing of concerts 1672–1749 examining innovations in the promotion and commodification of music, which are witness to the early development of music as a business.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes as its basis 4,356 advertisements for concerts in newspapers published in London between 1672 and 1749.

Findings

Musicians instigated a range of marketing strategies in an effort to attract a concert audience, which foreground those found in more recent and current arts marketing practice. They promoted regular concerts with a clear sense of programme planning to appeal to their audience, held a variety of different types of concerts and made use of a variety of pricing strategies. Concerts were held at an increasing number and range of venues with complementary ticket-selling locations.

Originality/value

Whilst there is some literature investigating concert-giving in this period from a musicological perspective (James, 1987; Johnstone, 1997; McVeigh, 2001; Weber, 2001; 2004b; 2004c; Wollenberg, 1981–1982; 2001; Wollenberg and McVeigh, 2004), what research there is that uses marketing as a window onto the musical culture of concert-giving in this period lacks detail (McGuinness, 1988; 2004a; 2004b; McGuinness and Diack Johnstone, 1990; Ogden et al., 2011). This paper illustrates how the development of public commercial concerts made of music a commodity offered to and demanded by a new breed of cultural consumers. Music, thus, participated in the commercialisation of leisure in late 17th- and 18th-century England and laid the foundations of its own development as a business.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Catherine Blaya

School safety and a positive school social climate have become one of the main concerns of the education systems in England and France in recent years. Teachers complain…

1473

Abstract

School safety and a positive school social climate have become one of the main concerns of the education systems in England and France in recent years. Teachers complain about a supposedly increasing difficulty in teaching and dealing with challenging behaviour. This study sets out to carry out a comparative survey on the social climate in schools in England and France, focusing on the teachers’ perceptions of their working conditions in socially deprived urban secondary schools and more particularly on the issue of school violence since the two aspects interact. The research sets out to investigate the issue of teachers’ initial and in‐service training as well as professional socialisation and the way it affects their perceptions of school social climate and violence. It highlights key differences that in England provide teachers with a safer and more positive environment.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Loretta S. Wilson and Susan Kwileck

In the wake of numerous late twentieth century cult disasters, and most recently, the September 11 tragedy, this paper considers the question, why do people obey…

Abstract

In the wake of numerous late twentieth century cult disasters, and most recently, the September 11 tragedy, this paper considers the question, why do people obey outrageous commands from charismatic authorities? According to Gary Becker, “the economic ap‐proach provides a valuable unified framework for understanding all human behavior” (Becker 1976:14). We test this generalization by attempting to explain, in terms of rational choice theory, the behavior of two members of infamous cults, the Manson Family and the Ragneesh Foundation International. Each of these subjects slavishly obeyed orders from a charismatic personality, one to the extent of committing murder. Were they mentally ill or rationally maximizing their utility? We consider these theoretical options. In August of 1969 Charles Manson ordered several of his followers to commit gruesome murders for the purpose of initiating the apocalypse. They obeyed. In late 1978, Jim Jones commanded over 900 members of the Peoples Temple to commit suicide. They obeyed. From 1981 to 1985, executing orders to build utopia perceived to come from their guru, members of the Ragneesh Foundation International terrorized the inhabitants of Antelope, Oregon. Similarly, followers of Osama Bin Laden are suspected of carrying out the disastrous suicide murders of September 11. Over past decades, the incidence of violence involving submission to a charismatic leader appears to be escalating. Increasingly the public must contend with the “awesome power” of charisma, “enshrouded in a mystique of irrationality” (Bradley 1987: 3–4). The extent to which followers committing criminal acts of obedience may be held accountable has become a pressing legal issue. How can this kind of volatile religious commitment be explained? In recent years, experts on cults have experimented with rational choice theory. According to economist, Gary Becker, “the economic approach provides a valuable unified framework for understanding all human behavior” (Becker 1976: 14). We test this extravagant claim with two cases of seemingly irrational commitment to a charismatic cult leader—one a follower of Bhagwan Rajneesh, the other a Manson Family killer. These subjects are not representative cult members but rather were chosen because they demonstrated an exceptional loyalty to their leaders that has been widely construed as the result of brainwashing or insanity. Rather than survey data, we rely on autobiographical testimonies since they offer a more detailed and comprehensive view of the thought processes that motivate behavior, the subject matter of this paper.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1937

SEPTEMBER sees most librarians again at the daily round, although some, including those of the universities and schools, are still scattered on mountains, golf‐courses…

Abstract

SEPTEMBER sees most librarians again at the daily round, although some, including those of the universities and schools, are still scattered on mountains, golf‐courses, beaches and oceans for a short while yet. To older men there is a curious feeling aroused by the knowledge that there is no Library Association Conference this month. They may, in a measure, find compensation in attending the annual meeting of the London and Home Counties Branch of the Association, which will be at St. Albans, or that of A.S.L.I.B., which has Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, as its venue. Both, by some lack of care which might have been avoided, occur on the same week‐end, September 24–26. Quite clearly the special problems of librarianship technique, such as processes, book‐selection and purchase, classification, catalogues, fines, publicity, salaries, hours, and so on almost infinitely, can no longer be discussed profitably at the Annual Meeting of the Library Association; smaller gatherings, such as these, are their fitting place. We make a suggestion to the L.A. Council, for what it is worth and without pretence to being original. It is that it should indicate to all its branches and sections the main questions to which they should devote attention, and that in due course they should produce their conclusions on them. These, being pooled, would form the basis of the L.A. Annual Meeting. This would make a purposeful programme for all, and the results of the Conference might then be considered definite and practical.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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