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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Ramya Yarlagadda, Catherine Bailey, Amanda Shantz, Patrick Briône and Ksenia Zheltoukhova

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of purposeful and ethical leadership in a UK county police force – referred to by the pseudonym PoliceOrg. The paper also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of purposeful and ethical leadership in a UK county police force – referred to by the pseudonym PoliceOrg. The paper also evaluates the extent to which officers feel their values fit with those of the organisation, and the outcomes achieved by purposeful and ethical leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey, interviews and focus groups were conducted at PoliceOrg. The findings are compared with those from a public sector case study and with a representative sample of the UK working population.

Findings

Purposeful leaders at PoliceOrg have a positive impact on important outcomes for their direct reports and provide a sense of direction and guidance to those who do not feel a strong fit between their values and those of their organisation.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on a new construct (purposeful leadership) that has not previously been explored in the academic literature. Consequently, the findings cannot be directly compared with those of other studies. The survey focused on the views of police sergeants and constables, and only one police force participated as a case study; hence, the generalisability of the findings is limited.

Practical implications

Police organisations should nurture and sustain workplace environments where leaders can translate their personal moral code and ethical values into their role behaviours to address the policing challenges of the future.

Originality/value

This study elucidates the concept of purposeful leadership in the context of a police force.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Catherine Bailey and Martin Clarke

The authors build on a recent article which highlighted the difficulty that many managers have in understanding why knowledge management (KM) is important for them personally and…

3846

Abstract

The authors build on a recent article which highlighted the difficulty that many managers have in understanding why knowledge management (KM) is important for them personally and their organisation. It argued that the issue can be addressed by ensuring that KM is understood in ways that illustrate its managerial currency, actionability and relevance and described how to achieve currency and actionability of the KM idea. This second paper addresses “personal relevance”, the other essential characteristic of usable ideas. The authors illustrate how different managerial roles can appreciate this personal relevance by focusing their activity selectively on different domains of managerial knowledge and specific, targeted knowledge management activities. KM is revealed as a usable idea which enhances their personal effectiveness, organisational influence and credibility as well as long‐term organisational interest. A personal KM audit is presented.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Catherine Bailey and Martin Clarke

Despite the ever‐burgeoning literature and growth of conceptual models and tools, hard‐pressed managers seem to find it difficult to appreciate the special significance that…

6155

Abstract

Despite the ever‐burgeoning literature and growth of conceptual models and tools, hard‐pressed managers seem to find it difficult to appreciate the special significance that knowledge management (KM) has for redefining their managerial work. In two complementary articles, this problem is investigated and ideas developed to help turn existing information about KM into “usable ideas”. In this first article, the importance of helping managers to relate knowledge management to what is organisationally important (currency), to what furthers an individual’s goals and interests (personal relevance), and to what is practical within an individual’s current capacity (actionable), is explained. Currency is explored using a managerial knowledge portfolio that identifies the knowledge to be managed in the critical areas of managerial focus, strategy, operational processes and change management. Actionability is explored using an organisational knowledge management activity matrix that describes KM activities in terms which are meaningful and provides a basis for a KM audit.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2023

Jill Wales, Glenda Cook and Cathy Bailey

This paper aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of a group of extra care tenants, who, as novice internet users, began to maintain their social relationships online…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of a group of extra care tenants, who, as novice internet users, began to maintain their social relationships online. Housing transitions in later life may jeopardise existing social relationships, leading to loneliness and social isolation. More recently, Covid-19 restrictions have limited familial face-to-face contact and wider social interactions. Thus, extra care tenants, who are not already online, may benefit from acquiring internet skills. This paper aims to enhance understanding of the participants’ transition from novices to experienced internet users and the impact on their social relationships and sense of self.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal, hermeneutic phenomenological study was conducted over eight months in two extra care housing schemes in north east England. Ten participants (56–98 years) with age-related physical, sensory and cognitive losses were recruited to the study. A series of semi-structured interviews and participant diaries captured the participants’ experience as they developed internet skills and communicated online.

Findings

All participants, including a blind individual, learnt to communicate online. Personalised adaptive strategies, peer support, training and management involvement facilitated internet uptake. Participants felt their social relationships were supported, and they regained biographical continuity, through being and feeling they belonged in the modern digital world.

Originality/value

The online experiences of extra care tenants are rarely voiced. Their perceptions may assist others to engage online, maintaining social connections, which could otherwise be lost.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Cathy Bailey, Natalie Forster, Barbara Douglas, Claire Webster Saaremets and Esther Salamon

Quality, accessible and appropriate housing is key to older people’s ability to live independently. The purpose of this paper is to understand older people’s housing aspirations…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality, accessible and appropriate housing is key to older people’s ability to live independently. The purpose of this paper is to understand older people’s housing aspirations and whether these are currently being met. Evidence suggests one in five households occupied by older people in England does not meet the standard of a decent home. The Building Research Establishment has calculated that poor housing costs the English National Health Service £1,4bn annually (Roys et al., 2016).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the findings of a participatory theatre approach to engaging with those not often heard from – notably, those ageing without children and older people with primary responsibility for ageing relatives – about planning for housing decisions in later life. The project was led by an older people’s forum, Elders Council, with Skimstone Arts organisation and Northumbria University, in the north east of England.

Findings

Findings suggest there is an urgent need to listen to and engage with people about their later life housing aspirations. There is also a need to use this evidence to inform housing, health and social care policy makers, practitioners, service commissioners and providers and product and service designers, to encourage older people to become informed and plan ahead.

Research limitations/implications

Use of a participatory theatre approach facilitated people to explore their own decision making and identify the types of information and support they need to make critical decisions about their housing in later life. Such insights can generate evidence for future housing, social care and health needs. Findings endorse the recent Communities and Local Government (2018) Select Committee Inquiry and report on Housing for Older People and the need for a national strategy for older people’s housing.

Originality/value

Although this call is evidenced through an English national case study, from within the context of global population ageing, it has international relevance.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

RICHARD E. BARRY

It is the rage in the literature today for archivists and records managers to address the issue of recordkeeping in The New Millennium. It is an idea that must be worthy of its…

1080

Abstract

It is the rage in the literature today for archivists and records managers to address the issue of recordkeeping in The New Millennium. It is an idea that must be worthy of its own acronym, TNM. It has a nice, seductive ring to it that gives one the sense of joining the ranks of the pundits and visionaries. This author has succumbed like all of the others. And I know I'll do it again — soon. I can't wait. At my age, when one begins to get the idea that it might be the last chance one will have to talk about a TNM, it is downright irresistible. One has to bleed it for all it is worth.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1992

David Butcher and Catherine Bailey

Questions whether current management development programmes do orcan have any lasting value. Suggests that many are inappropriatelyfocused, seriously limited in their content and…

491

Abstract

Questions whether current management development programmes do or can have any lasting value. Suggests that many are inappropriately focused, seriously limited in their content and unambitious for their recipients. Argues that management development itself needs to change: clients have a right to expect a service which has useful, measurable and lasting effects. The onus is on the providers – internal and external consultants, and business schools – to deliver this.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Martin Clarke, Catherine Bailey and Joanna Burr

This paper is derived from a two‐year study that sought to provide a critical understanding of the current state of business leadership development (BLD) and to identify…

2766

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is derived from a two‐year study that sought to provide a critical understanding of the current state of business leadership development (BLD) and to identify directions for innovative future practice. The second of two companion papers, this contribution aims to investigate the influence of unfavourable competing agendas on BLD and how human resource development (HRD) professionals can work effectively within such circumstances.

Design/methodological approach

The paper analyses three case studies of HRD managers who made significant contributions to their organisation's BLD despite unfavourable political circumstances. These individuals were selected from a population of 190 managers from the first phase of the overall study.

Findings

The cases highlight the centrality of political activity to effective BLD design and implementation that is subject to unfavourable circumstances. In particular, the individuals demonstrated the importance of relationship management, challenge and critique and of building change from the bottom up, irrespective of direct senior management support.

Practical implications

The cases shed light on the types of behaviour that may enable HRD professionals to make an effective contribution to BLD, even when there is little formal senior management support. Questions are provided to encourage personal learning and debate about the role and value of HR in the enactment of BLD.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that much best practice advice on leadership development needs to be tempered with an acknowledgement of the degree to which it is subject to competing interests and postulates that constructive political action may be a legitimate activity for HRD managers despite mainstream unitarist advice.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Catherine Bailey and Martin Clarke

This paper is derived from a two‐year study that sought to provide a critical understanding of the current state of business leadership development (BLD) and to identify…

2184

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is derived from a two‐year study that sought to provide a critical understanding of the current state of business leadership development (BLD) and to identify directions for innovative future practice. The first of two companion papers, this contribution aims to examine the issue of achieving business relevance in BLD and the quality of HR/management development strategy formulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses four organisation case studies of BLD strategy derived from interview data sourced from 103 senior line/HRD managers in 20 organisations.

Findings

The findings highlight the need for HRD managers to take a discriminating approach to linking BLD strategy, development method, evaluation and the role of management development. In particular, the cases studied reflect the importance of informal activity and politics in the execution of BLD and the positive effect of individual leadership in moderating the effectiveness of the linkages between business context, BLD strategy and its implementation.

Practical implications

The paper provides a conceptual framework to enable practitioners to discriminate between different bundles of development practices that can, over time, be translated into behaviours that suit the changing needs of an organisation. A list of useful starting points is provided for managers to review and improve BLD strategy and practice in their own organisation.

Originality/value

The paper provides a framework that shows the importance of different development populations, different sponsors, interest groups and strategic timeframes in enabling more informed discussion about the strategic alignment of BLD.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1964

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Abstract

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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