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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

VanLal Thanzami, John Archer and Cath Sullivan

This paper aims to investigate Western studies on beliefs about aggression which have found that men typically hold instrumental beliefs and women hold expressive beliefs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate Western studies on beliefs about aggression which have found that men typically hold instrumental beliefs and women hold expressive beliefs.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate whether beliefs about aggression are qualitatively different in an Indian sample, interviews were undertaken with focus groups of 16 and 26‐year‐olds from north‐east India.

Findings

IPA analysis indicated that respondents viewed their aggression in terms of: how they might appear; honour or shame; gender roles; and as a loss of self‐control. These findings indicate that beliefs about aggression held in this Indian sample are more complex than can be characterised by the instrumental/expressive dimension.

Practical implications

Implications of these findings for developing more culture‐specific measures of beliefs about aggression are discussed.

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Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article

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Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article

Philip Young

The purpose of this paper is to explore dissemination, broadly considered, of an open access (OA) database as part of a librarian‐faculty collaboration currently in progress.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore dissemination, broadly considered, of an open access (OA) database as part of a librarian‐faculty collaboration currently in progress.

Design/methodology/approach

Dissemination of an online database by librarians is broadly considered, including metadata optimization for multiple access points and user notification methods.

Findings

Librarians address OA dissemination challenges by investigating search engine optimization and seeking new opportunities for dissemination on the web. Differences in library metadata formats inhibit metadata optimization and need resolution.

Research limitations/implications

The collaboration is in progress and many of the ideas and conclusions listed have not been implemented.

Practical implications

Libraries should consider their role in scholarly publishing, develop workflows to enable it, and extend their efforts to the web.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the scant literature on dissemination by libraries, and discusses dissemination challenges encountered by a non‐peer reviewed, dynamic scholarly resource.

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OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article

The Corporate Librarians Group of New York is an ad hoc gathering of information professionals in the New York area concerned with issues relating to corporate…

Abstract

The Corporate Librarians Group of New York is an ad hoc gathering of information professionals in the New York area concerned with issues relating to corporate librarianship and corporate information control and retrieval. Our members are drawn from a range of special libraries, including law and finance, and include records managers as well.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Transforming Information Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-928-1

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Article

Marian Court

This article draws on longitudinal research into the establishment of co‐principalships. It discusses this innovative approach to school management in relation to women’s…

Abstract

This article draws on longitudinal research into the establishment of co‐principalships. It discusses this innovative approach to school management in relation to women’s negotiations of their motivations, aspirations and strategies for career advancement and work/life balance. Longitudinal case studies of three primary school co‐principal initiatives were carried out between 1995 and 2000. Repeat interviews and observations with co‐principals, board chairpersons and school staff were conducted. Interviews were also undertaken with parents; students; and representatives of state education agencies, national governing boards, principals’ associations and teacher unions, alongside analysis of school and state policy documents. The resulting case study narratives described how each co‐principalship was initiated and either established or dis‐established. A discourse analysis of these narratives then examined how links between discourse, knowledge and power were being negotiated and challenged, as the new subject position of “co‐principal” was being constructed in New Zealand. This article analyses the significance of the similarities and differences in the women’s career backgrounds, motivations and strategies for moving into management positions. As they initiated their co‐principalships, the women variously went “against the grain” and/or co‐opted elements of the new public management corporate executive model for school leadership, which was introduced within the radical state restructuring during the late 1980s and early 90s in New Zealand.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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