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Article

Elizabeth A. Castillo and Mai P. Trinh

Organizations increasingly operate under volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) conditions. Traditional command-and-control leadership can be ineffective in…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations increasingly operate under volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) conditions. Traditional command-and-control leadership can be ineffective in such chaotic environments. The purpose of this paper is to outline an alternative model to help leaders and organizations navigate effectively through VUCA environments. By developing three fundamental capacities (absorptive, adaptive and generative), leaders can cultivate organizations capable of continuous synchronization with their fitness landscapes. Central tenets of the framework include diversity, slack, learning, humility, reflection in action and abductive logic.

Design/methodology/approach

This framework is designed based on literature insights, conceptual analysis and experts’ judgment. The paper integrates knowledge from a variety of disciplines and interprets them through the lens of complex adaptive systems.

Findings

This paper argues for a process centered, contemplative approach to organizational leadership and development. By providing the underlying rationale for the proposed interventions (e.g. Ashby’s law of requisite variety), the paper also reorients busy leaders’ mental models to show why these time investments are worth implementing.

Practical implications

This actionable framework can help leaders and organizations be more effective operating in a VUCA context.

Originality/value

This paper provides a historic context as to why prediction and certainty are favored leadership strategies, why these approaches are no longer suitable and specific steps leaders can take to develop absorptive, adaptive and generative capacities to transform their organizations. Its scholarly contribution is the synthesis of disparate bodies of literature, weaving those multiple academic perspectives into a practical roadmap to enhance organizational leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Z. Gao, X‐M. Wang, H. Wan and Zhi‐Ming Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of various catalyst contents, resin solid contents, catalyst species and wood extract on urea‐formaldehyde (UF…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of various catalyst contents, resin solid contents, catalyst species and wood extract on urea‐formaldehyde (UF) curing by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique. The finding obtained would benefit the manufacturers of UF‐bonded composite panels.

Design/methodology/approach

The UF curing rate under each condition in terms of DSC peak temperature was measured by high‐pressure DSC at a heating rate of 15°C/min; the correlations of peak temperature with catalyst content, resin solid content, catalyst species and wood extract, respectively, were regressed via a model equation, which described the curing characteristics of the UF bonding system.

Findings

A model equation, Tp=A · EXP(−B · CC per cent)+D, was proposed to characterise the DSC peak temperatures or the rate of UF curing with regressing coefficients greater than 0.97 (commonly greater than 0.99). The constants A and B in the model equation were found to correspond to kinetic characteristics of UF resin curing reaction. The constant D in the model equation is believed to be associated with the utmost peak temperature, which implies that the DSC peak temperature will finally reach a maximum with catalyst content increasing. It was also found that the wood extracts having higher pH value and base buffer capacity had stronger catalyses on UF curing.

Research limitations/implications

The catalysts commonly used in medium density fibreboard plants or particleboard plants are those having the utmost peak temperature of about 90‐95°C; the catalyses of wood extracts were much weaker than that of catalyst NH4Cl.

Practical implications

The model equation could be used to predict the peak temperature or the curing rate of UF resin, and to quantify the effects of wood extracts on UF curing.

Originality/value

The study developed a model equation that can well characterise the UF curing, and quantified the effects of wood extracts on UF curing.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article

Ann Casebeer, Janice Popp and Cathie Scott

This paper aims to report “positively deviant” experiences of three public sector networks seeking to enhance organizational and system level capacities. It is the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report “positively deviant” experiences of three public sector networks seeking to enhance organizational and system level capacities. It is the authors' thesis that the knowledge base concerning the true benefits and pitfalls of networks can be captured and interpreted only through intense, ongoing learning effort embedded in practice on the ground, combined with sustained in‐depth observation and collaborative research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes through case examples why and how different kinds of networks within different jurisdictional contexts and different organizational cultures are being used to enhance the climate for change towards better health care and improved health. The authors describe the contexts, structures, processes and impacts of three “positively deviant” networks.

Findings

The network form can provide opportunity for nurturing changes and innovations within large organizational and complex system environments. This opportunity to create additional and different pathways for improved decision making and service provision comes with challenges that should be recognized.

Practical implications

The authors' experiences indicate that, for networks, a key component of success relates to pulling and pushing at the edges of multiple connections and boundaries in “positively deviant” ways. This pushing and pulling is intrinsically evidence of organizational and intraorganizational learning – in the examples presented – for the improvement of health care and health.

Originality/value

Other networks can learn from the reported experiences and add their own cases to the empirical understanding of how networks can make a difference; this in turn can help the conceptual and theoretical understanding of them.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part

Cynthia Roberts and Carolyn Roper

One of the top domestic issues of concern to Americans is access to high-quality and affordable health care, and there is a growing concern about how institutions…

Abstract

One of the top domestic issues of concern to Americans is access to high-quality and affordable health care, and there is a growing concern about how institutions struggling to survive within this trillion-dollar industry will increase their effectiveness in the future. This chapter outlines a process of leadership development using an action learning approach in one Midwestern health care system over a period of three years. The process addresses both the development of the individual leader as well as the collective leadership capacity in an effort to sustain organizational learning and effectiveness over time. A model is presented that covers four phases or Four C's of development, which includes movement from individual Competency development, to the development of social capital through the enhancement of Connections and Creation of shared understanding, ultimately expanding Capacity for change within the organization. We also address other factors that must be taken into consideration that will either enhance or impede the concentric movement such as culture, sponsor support, and alignment of systems and structures.

Details

Organization Development in Healthcare: Conversations on Research and Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-709-4

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Article

Lynn Priddy

The aim of this paper is to describe how academic institutions that focus improvement of student learning do much better than those that focus on compliance and assessment.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe how academic institutions that focus improvement of student learning do much better than those that focus on compliance and assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective observation of institutional interaction with the North Central Association Higher Learning Commission, especially the 264 colleges and universities that have participated in the Commission's assessment workshops, provides insight into the characteristics that make the most positive difference.

Findings

The paper finds that academic institutions do better when: assessment is best understood as the means and student learning itself as the end; shared responsibility and collective capacity are intentionally developed; internal leaders, of different types, are identified and developed; collaborative processes that actively engage people replace concerns about buy‐in; institutions jump in and learn as they go along; program review becomes an area of shared faculty/administration interest; changed, parallel or separate core processes permit attention to enduring issues; and institutions begin wherever they chose to begin and from there develop the means to complete a full cycle of outcomes assessment. Another more recent emphasis is the need to inform the public and other stakeholders about what students are learning.

Originality/value

This paper draws on the insights of those who work at the Higher Learning Commission, who share the unusual perspective of having experience of dealing with hundreds of academic institutions.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Eileen Fischer

The aim of this paper is to provide an advanced understanding of the dynamics of a scholarly career.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide an advanced understanding of the dynamics of a scholarly career.

Design/methodology/approach

An assemblage of a theoretic lens was adopted to help make sense of how the focal scholar came to have certain capacities and characteristics and how these evolved over time.

Findings

The critical determinants of the capacities of this scholar have arisen from intersections with the institutions she has been a part of and individuals with whom she has been privileged to interact.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to adapt an assemblage theoretic lens to make sense of a professional’s career accomplishments and trajectory and to draw inferences for career management from this perspective.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Piotr Walter, Andrzej Pepłowski, Łukasz Górski, Daniel Janczak and Małgorzata Jakubowska

Because of the bioaccumulation effect, organophosphorus pesticides cause long-term damage to mammals, even at small concentrations. The ability to perturb the phospholipid…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the bioaccumulation effect, organophosphorus pesticides cause long-term damage to mammals, even at small concentrations. The ability to perturb the phospholipid bilayer structure as well as the overstimulation of cholinergic receptors makes them hazardous to humans. Therefore, there is a need for a quick and inexpensive detection of organophosphorus pesticides for agricultural and household use. As organophosphorus pesticides are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, biosensors using this mechanism hold a great promise to meet these requirements with a fraction of reagents and time used for measurement comparing to laboratory methods. This study aims to manufacture AChE-coated, screen-printed carbon electrodes applicable in such amperometric biosensors.

Design/methodology/approach

AChE enzyme, known for catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATCh), could be used to obtain electrochemically active thiocholine from acetylthiocholine chloride in aqueous solutions. Using Malathion’s inhibitory effect towards AChE, pesticides’ presence can be detected by reduction of anodic oxidation peaks of thiocholine in cyclic voltammetry.

Findings

The conducted research proved that it is possible to detect pesticides using low-cost, simple-to-manufacture screen-printed graphite (GR) electrodes with an enzymatic (AChE) coating. Investigated electrodes displayed significant catalytic activity to the hydrolysis of ATCh. Owing to inhibition effect of the enzyme, amperometric response of the samples decreased in pesticide-spiked solution, allowing determination of organophosphorus pesticides.

Originality/value

Printed electronics has grown significantly in recent years as well as research focused on carbon-based nanocomposites. Yet, the utilization of carbon nanocomposites in screen-printed electronics is still considered a novelty in the market. Biosensors have proved useful not only in laboratory conditions but also in home applications, as glucometers are a superior solution for glucose determination for personal use. Although pesticides could be detected accurately using chromatography, spectroscopy, spectrometry or spectrophotometry, the market lacks low-cost, disposable solutions for pesticide detection applicable for household use. With biosensing techniques and electric paths screen-printed with GR or graphene nanocomposites, this preliminary research focuses on meeting these needs.

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Article

David Wasdell

Based in the discipline of applied consultancy‐research, this paper seeks to present a synthesis‐review of the social dynamics underlying the stalled negotiations of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based in the discipline of applied consultancy‐research, this paper seeks to present a synthesis‐review of the social dynamics underlying the stalled negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Its aim is to enhance understanding of the processes involved, to offer a working agenda to the organizational learning community, and to act as a dynamic and interpretive intervention in the negotiation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach draws on a wide range of tools from the consultancy‐research domain including force‐field analysis of complex social behaviour, informal interviews, direct participation, existential reflection and process analysis, delineation of power dynamics, literature survey and psychoanalytic exploration of the irrational and unconscious factors involved.

Findings

Several findings emerged from the consultancy research. The force‐field analysis revealed the intensity of polarisation experienced at every point of the negotiation. Economic vested interests and political dynamics blocked all possibility of effective decision making and drove irrational attacks on the validity of climate science as a way of manipulating public opinion. The influence of unconscious factors was paramount, rooted in the re‐stimulation of collective pre‐traumatic‐stress disorder, and mediated via a set of social defences against anxiety.

Research limitations/implications

Significant limitations in the methodology concern the level of subjectivity involved. The development of working hypotheses was exposed to constant review to check for researcher‐specific projection and selectivity of significant data.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the paper for the development and application of organizational learning are spelled out in the final section. Particular attention is drawn to the need to take account of irrational and unconscious phenomena driving social psychodynamics.

Originality/value

The paper represents profoundly original work, emanating from the author's wide‐ranging involvement in the content and process of the international climate‐change negotiations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article

Marta Mori, Ronan McDermott, Saut Sagala and Yasmina Wulandari

The purpose of this paper is to explore how culture, including traditions and social structures, can influence resilience and how culturally sensitive relief operations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how culture, including traditions and social structures, can influence resilience and how culturally sensitive relief operations can put affected people and their context at the core of any interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the Mt Sinabung volcano area in Indonesia was undertaken. As part of the case study, an analysis of interventions was conducted, which was complemented by semi-structured interviews with Karo cultural experts and humanitarian organisations.

Findings

Culture influences the manner in which the Karo people react to volcano eruptions with varying implications for recovery. In addition, relief organisations which understand people’s actions through a cultural lens have better managed to tailor programs with long-term impact, thereby avoiding aid dependency.

Practical implications

Practical examples of disaster management activities that adequately account for the beneficiaries’ way of living prior to the eruptions are provided. Aid actors are provided with guidance concerning how to better tailor their activities in line with a cultural lens.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical grounding for claims concerning the role of culture in planning interventions in Indonesia and other similar contexts.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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