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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Leah Krevit and Linda Crays

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot program implemented by the Houston Academy of Medicine‐Texas Medical Center Library and The University of Texas School of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot program implemented by the Houston Academy of Medicine‐Texas Medical Center Library and The University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston to design the multi‐institutional repository for the Texas Medical Center.

Design/methodology/approach

The steps involved in the program are outlined and the lessons learned from the implementation are analyzed.

Findings

The success of the institutional repository depends on appropriate communication with faculty, a deep understanding of the publishing process, identifying appropriate partners, designing a flexible technology infrastructure, and engaging in active collaboration with key players. The Library is the logical center for this activity.

Practical implications

The paper should assist libraries with the unique activities involved in creating a viable multi‐institutional repository in a research‐intense academic medical environment.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes the challenges inherent in introducing institutional digital repositories to the academic medical community. Currently, institutional repositories are being developed in only a small percentage of the academic medical centers in the USA.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Ahmad Beltagui, Kjartan Sigurdsson, Marina Candi and Johann C.K.H. Riedel

The purpose of this paper is to propose a solution to the challenges of professional service firms (PSF), which are referred to as cat herding, opaque quality and lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a solution to the challenges of professional service firms (PSF), which are referred to as cat herding, opaque quality and lack of process standardization. These result from misalignment in the mental pictures that managers, employees and customers have of the service. The study demonstrates how the process of articulating a shared service concept reduces these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative methodology is used to analyze the perspectives of old management, new management and employees during organizational change in a PSF – a website design company growing to offer full-service branding. Group narratives are constructed using longitudinal data gathered through interviews and fieldwork, in order to compare the misaligned mental pictures and show the benefits of articulating the service concept.

Findings

Professional employees view growth and change as threats to their culture and practice, particularly when new management seeks to standardize processes. These threats are revealed to stem from misinterpretations caused by miscommunication of intentions and lack of participation in decision making. Articulating a shared service concept helps to align understanding and return the firm to equilibrium.

Research limitations/implications

The narrative methodology helps unpack conflicting perspectives, but is open to claims of subjectivity and misrepresentation. To ensure fairness and trustworthiness, informants were invited to review and approve the narratives.

Originality/value

The study contributes propositions related to the value of articulating a shared service concept as a means of minimizing the challenges of PSFs.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Edna Pasher, Roni Porat, Yaara Turjeman-Levi, Mor Harir and Yael Caspi

Among the key challenges facing today’s business organizations is that of ongoing innovation for survival. To meet this challenge, new skills for effective leadership are…

Abstract

Among the key challenges facing today’s business organizations is that of ongoing innovation for survival. To meet this challenge, new skills for effective leadership are required: knowledge workers need to be creative and entrepreneurial. Leading them, however, can be like ‘herding cats’. The classic metaphor of the organization as a machine does not offer an effective approach to leading complex human organizations. New thinking is needed, such as complexity theory, which considers the organization as a living organism and so provides a basis for innovative approaches to organizational structure and management. In this context, performing arts organizations can be a fruitful source of leadership inspiration. Performing arts organizations have never adopted the concept of the organization as machine and have therefore managed to keep alive the passion of their people. Thus these organizations constitute a valuable example for managers in the Knowledge Age, who must replace traditional leadership approaches to attract, keep and grow talent. Here, a case study is presented in which the authors, including the conductor Maestro Roni Porat, decode the key success factors in conducting an orchestra and consider their transferability to talent management in business organizations. While setting the tone, the conductor gives each of the players a chance to shine and co-evolve with the rest, thus creating a winning harmonic orchestra.

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds his/her own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Can a community have a strategy? For those who work in business and read about, design and enact strategy on a daily basis, one would suspect that could have two very distinct answers to this question. The first camp would nod in agreement, and agree that almost any person or group can benefit from having a strategy, although they may not be clear on what that could look like for any given community. On the other hand, it is also easy to imagine a second group shaking their head dismissively, saying that without a clear purpose, vision and hierarchy any such idea would be like herding cats and, therefore, doomed to failure.

Practical implications

This paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Marc Prensky

The author suggests we know a lot less about learning than we normally admit – in fact there is no generally accepted definition of what it is. He suggests that this is a…

Abstract

The author suggests we know a lot less about learning than we normally admit – in fact there is no generally accepted definition of what it is. He suggests that this is a big problem with designing so‐called e‐Learning, most of which is really just "e‐Teaching." There is a need, the author argues, for much more differentiation of learning, especially by type of material to be learned. Much of the available research on learning is not about how people learn, but about how they learn in groups – i.e. classes, or, as the author calls them, herds. "Herding" introduces all sort of learning problems, and, to be successful, any e‐Learning must take one‐on‐one tutoring, which is two standard deviations more effective than classroom teaching – as its base.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

George Gordon

In higher education, translating institutional objectives into meaningful action is a challenging task, particularly given the currency attached to analogies such as the…

Abstract

In higher education, translating institutional objectives into meaningful action is a challenging task, particularly given the currency attached to analogies such as the view that managing academics is akin to herding cats, or that teaching in HE is one of the last cottage industries. Yet alignment is becoming increasingly important, as the reports of national inquiries and commissions (e.g. Dearing, West, Boyer) and the pronouncements and plans of governments indicate. The paper examines one illustration of steps that an institution has taken to translate objectives into action.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Leading Educational Systems and Schools in Times of Disruption and Exponential Change: A Call for Courage, Commitment and Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-851-2

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Abstract

Details

Mastering Brexits Through The Ages
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-897-2

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