Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Vathsala Wickramasinghe and Rasika Chandrasekara

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether permanent workers with standard employment that is protected, and casual workers with long‐term employment that is not…

1797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether permanent workers with standard employment that is protected, and casual workers with long‐term employment that is not protected but performing the same core jobs, along with permanent workers side‐by‐side in the same work setting, exhibit different work‐related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Permanent workers and casual workers holding core jobs with long‐term employment responded to the survey questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis.

Findings

Job satisfaction, procedural justice and work performance were found to be important work‐related outcomes that discriminate between permanent and casual workers.

Originality/value

Although consequences of different employment arrangements would be of interest to many organisations world wide, on the one hand, little empirical research has compared work‐related outcomes of permanent workers with casuals (holding the same core functions with long‐term employment) or permanent workers with workers in any form of nonstandard employment arrangement. On the other hand, the literature on the use of labour flexibility strategies is mainly concentrated on developed market economies. If organisations use casual workers alongside permanent workers in core jobs, there is a need for examining implications of such practices. The findings of this study establish baseline data that would be a source of general guidance in stimulating future research in this area.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Belinda C. Allen

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential differences in identity commitment and career success perceptions between casually and permanently employed nurses…

2658

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential differences in identity commitment and career success perceptions between casually and permanently employed nurses. Specifically, it aims to investigate whether casually employed nurses have lower levels of commitment to their professional identity, as compared to permanently employed nurses, and whether this in turn negatively affects their perceptions of career success.

Design/methodology/approach

Role identity theory was used to predict the career success perceptions of casually employed (n=181) versus permanently employed (n=476) nurses. Data were collected via a self‐report questionnaire.

Findings

The data revealed that casual nurses had lower levels of identity commitment and more negative career success perceptions. Affective commitment fully mediated the relationship between employment status and subjective career success.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should test the replicability of these findings with longitudinal data.

Originality/value

This paper provides novel insights to the temporary employment and careers literatures. Given the previously uncharted territory of understanding the role of identity in the career success perceptions of different categories of workers, it opens avenues for future research, while also answering theoretical questions about the identity and career consequences of temporary employment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Patricia Leighton and Richard W. Painter

The recent House of Lords decision in Carmichael v. National Power plc decided that a casual/zero‐hours worker was self‐employed and thus excluded from most of the basic…

3749

Abstract

The recent House of Lords decision in Carmichael v. National Power plc decided that a casual/zero‐hours worker was self‐employed and thus excluded from most of the basic employment statutory rights. The aims of this article are to note the incidence and characteristics of the casual workforce in the UK and EU; to explore the current legal framework applying to casual workers, including the decision and implications of Carmichael; to note recent and intended legal measures which have particular relevance for casual workers; to evaluate the likely effectiveness of those recent or proposed legal measures; and to consider possible alternative strategies to establish an appropriate framework for casuals.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

John Burgess

As with many other OECD economies, a growing part‐time employment share has been a characteristic of the Australian workforce experience over the past three decades…

2140

Abstract

As with many other OECD economies, a growing part‐time employment share has been a characteristic of the Australian workforce experience over the past three decades. Examines several distinctive features of Australian part‐time employment, namely: the high proportion of part‐time employees who are employed under casual employment conditions, the growing male part‐time employment share and the growing proportion of involuntary part‐time workers. Outlines several important policy implications, namely: many part‐time employees are entitled to but not receiving permanent employment conditions; many part‐timers are excluded from the many non‐wage entitlements associated with full‐time employment; adjusted hourly wage rates for part‐time workers appear to be falling relative to full‐time workers, the ability of part‐time employees to participate in the newly emerging collective bargaining framework is constrained by their very low trade union density relative to full‐time employees; and there are doubts as to how part‐time workers can effectively participate in and benefit from the emerging programme of employee‐based superannuation entitlements.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged…

1346

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged workers' preferences to enter different retirement employment options within the contingent and the flexible work arrangements (FWA) types of bridge employment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study was collected in 2008 using a questionnaire with 31 items. A total of 144 mature aged workers from multiple firms, aged 50 years and over, working full‐time, in the construction industry participated in the study. The collected data was analysed using correlation and regression analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that the study variables have positive and negative influences on pre‐retirees' preference for the retirement employment options within the contingent and the FWA bridge employment. It was also found that while income failed to moderate, social retirement anxieties did significantly moderate the relationship between perceived financial preparedness and the different employment options within the contingent bridge employment.

Practical implications

This study clearly provides practitioners and career counsellors a new insight that the work and non‐work predictors for the retirement employment options within each of the contingent and the FWA bridge employments vary between factors of perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties and level of income.

Originality/value

In contradiction to the existing literature that “comfortable” social retirement adjustment as a determinant for bridge employment, this study's findings revealed that if pre‐retirees perceive that they are not adequately financially prepared for retirement, they would opt for bridge employment irrespective of levels of social retirement anxieties.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Cameron Allan

The growth of non‐standard or atypical forms of employment, such as part‐time, casual work and so on, represents one of the most dramatic changes in the structure of…

5819

Abstract

The growth of non‐standard or atypical forms of employment, such as part‐time, casual work and so on, represents one of the most dramatic changes in the structure of employment in Australia and other countries since the late 1970s. Management employment strategies have been identified as a major causal factor in the expansion of non‐standard employment. Employers are increasingly using these atypical forms of employment as a means of lowering direct labour costs. Argues, however, that there are a number of hidden costs involved in using non‐standard employment that are not commonly taken into consideration. Highlights the negative effects atypical employment can have on work relations, and the motivation of employees, based on a detailed hospital case study and other evidence. Argues that atypical labour may serve to undermine quality standards and the attainment of business strategies.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Doris Grinspun

Focuses on nursing in the context of a broader analysis of flexible labour markets, with a focus on part‐time and casual work, which thousands of nurses in Canada have…

Abstract

Focuses on nursing in the context of a broader analysis of flexible labour markets, with a focus on part‐time and casual work, which thousands of nurses in Canada have been forced into through health care restructure. Discusses the subject in great detail and concludes employers lost control of their own strategy with regard to the restructure of employment for their staff.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Liz Price

Individual employment law has the dual aim of stimulating goodpersonnel practice and of providing minimum protection for vulnerableemployees, such as those found in the…

Abstract

Individual employment law has the dual aim of stimulating good personnel practice and of providing minimum protection for vulnerable employees, such as those found in the hotel and catering industry. Findings from a survey of “high quality” hotels and restaurants show that large establishments have developed a veneer of formality in some areas of personnel management, but that the detail within policies and procedures rarely conforms to all the requirements set down in legislation and codes of practice. Finds that, in small establishments, practices are informal and often fail to meet basic legal requirements. As for individual protection, the large majority of part‐timers qualify for the equivalent of full‐time rights, but casual workers, who supply a substantial proportion of labour needs in the industry, have no protection at all. Makes a strong case for extending employment rights to casuals and indicates that such a development would not reduce their employment opportunities, nor would it cause particular concern for employers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Eileen Drew

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of…

Abstract

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It is estimated that in 1970, average annual hours worked per employee amounted to only 60% of those for 1870. Two major factors are attributed to explaining the underlying trend towards a reduction in working time: (a) the increase in the number of voluntary part‐time employees and (b) the decrease in average annual number of days worked per employee (Kok and de Neubourg, 1986). The authors noted that the growth rate of part‐time employment in many countries was greater than the corresponding rate of growth in full‐time employment.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 9 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Lixin Cai

– The purpose of this paper is to enhance understanding low pay dynamics of Australian employees, with a focus on the determination of low pay duration.

1882

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance understanding low pay dynamics of Australian employees, with a focus on the determination of low pay duration.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on a representative longitudinal survey of Australian households to provide empirical findings from both descriptive analysis and econometric modelling.

Findings

The results show that workers who have entered low pay from higher pay also have a higher hazard rate of transitioning to higher pay; and those who have entered low pay from non-employment are more likely to return to non-employment. Union members, public sector jobs and working in medium to large size firms tend to increase the hazard rate of transitioning to higher pay, while immigrants from non-English speaking countries and workers with health problems have a lower hazard rate of moving into higher pay. There is some evidence that the longer a worker is on low pay, the less likely he or she is to transition to higher pay.

Originality/value

This study addresses an information gap regarding the determination of low pay duration. The findings help identify workers who are at high risk of staying on low pay or transitioning into non-employment and are therefore informative for developing targeted policy to help the low paid maintain employment and/or move up the earnings ladder. The results also suggest that policy intervention should take place at an early stage of a low pay spell.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000