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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Michael Y.L. Chew, Sheila Conejos and Jessie Sze Long Law

Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings can potentially address the current surge in façade cleaning cost, maintenance and labour problems. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings can potentially address the current surge in façade cleaning cost, maintenance and labour problems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate potential maintainability issues and design challenges concerning the effective performance of TiO2 façade coatings’ hydrophilic properties, especially in tropical environments such as Singapore. This paper aims to establish a list of green maintainability design criteria to help minimise future TiO2 façade coating issues when this coating is applied on commercial buildings with concrete and stonemasonry façade materials.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-mode approach that includes a literature review, site investigation, instrumental case studies and expert interviews is used in this study.

Findings

TiO2 coatings help improve façade performance whilst offering environmental benefits to society. This study reports that green maintainability design criteria are vital requirements in designing sustainable buildings at the outset. The identified defects and issues will aid in ensuring the effectiveness of TiO2 application in building façades.

Originality/value

This study acts as a foundation for future researchers to strengthen this little researched area, serves as a useful guide in preventing possible TiO2 coating issues and promotes industry awareness of the use of TiO2 façade coatings.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Jasmine B.-Y. Sim and Malathy Krishnasamy

One would not commonly associate democracy with Singapore, instead scholars have often described Singapore as an illiberal democracy and an authoritarian state. At the…

Abstract

Purpose

One would not commonly associate democracy with Singapore, instead scholars have often described Singapore as an illiberal democracy and an authoritarian state. At the same time, all Singaporean school students recite the national pledge of allegiance in school every morning, in which they pledge “to build a democratic society based on justice and equality”. What do students know about democracy? Are they able to distinguish the characteristics of democratic systems from non-democratic ones? The purpose of this paper is to report on Singapore students’ understandings of democracy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative instrumental case study design, 64 students from three secondary schools were interviewed and the social studies curriculum was analysed.

Findings

Overall, students had poor knowledge of democracy. Consistent with a lack of knowledge of democracy, most students also showed a relatively uncritical acceptance of hierarchy and deference to authority, and held a superficial understanding of citizenship. Civics lessons through social studies, and the school environment did little to promote students’ engagement with democracy.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that it is important that students be given the opportunities to develop a basic conceptual knowledge of democracy, as they are not capable of discriminating democratic characteristics from non-democratic ones without it. At the very least, students should know the relevance of what they pledge relative to their nation’s model of democracy, or in the absence of a clear model, be encouraged to struggle with the various existing models of democracies so that, as the future of Singapore, they might determine and adapt the ideals that they deem best for the nation.

Originality/value

This paper is an original study of Singapore students’ understandings of democracy.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Sheila Conejos, Michael Yit Lin Chew and Fikril Hakim Bin Azril

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building…

Abstract

Purpose

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building technologies (e.g. VGS) have grown in complexity which poses maintainability challenges. Designing with maintainability in mind is crucial in delivering efficient and sustainable buildings. This paper aims to assist designers and allied professionals in terms of integrating maintainability and sustainable design in developing high-rise VGS directly from its design inception.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is grounded on the “Green Maintainability” concept which link maintainability, sustainability and facility management right at the outset. The Green Maintainability factors are translated into critical design criteria which are used to analyze the selected instrumental case studies to evaluate the high-rise VGS performance and maintainability potential. A qualitative approach via the triangulation of data collected from relevant literatures, field surveys and walkthrough interviews is undertaken.

Findings

Findings have shown that the major VGS defects which are mostly occurring in the case studies are issues concerning fallen leaves and dirt accumulation; safety issues during cleaning and repairs; insufficient maintenance access; algae/ mould growth; withering plants; water stagnation/ ponding; poor/faulty irrigation and water dripping and unavailability of natural elements. Best practices and lessons learned revealed few design oversight and technical issues concerning high-rise VGS façade implementation. While maintenance cost, biodiversity and lack of coordination among involved professionals are the additional issues which emerged during the stakeholders’ walkthrough interviews.

Originality/value

Current researches conducted on the maintainability of green building technologies (e.g. high-rise VGS) are still few. This research study is the first comprehensive assessment to determine the green maintainability potential and performance of high-rise VGS in tropical conditions.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Low Sui Pheng and Christopher H.Y. Leong

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many…

Abstract

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many countries in Asia, including Singapore. One of the arguments put forward to explain the financial crisis in Asia relates to the Asian style of management, which purportedly includes kinsmanship and guanxi or family connections. But is this really the case? Is the Asian management style significantly different from the Western style of management? It is shown that the style of management in Asian countries can also be explained and described using contemporary management theories from the West. This is achieved through a case study in construction project management for a typical family‐run building firm in Singapore. Field observations on the construction site suggest that the style of management in Asia can be related to modern management theories from the West.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Joan C. Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the evolution of Singapore as a destination for international tourists, comparing contemporary circumstances with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the evolution of Singapore as a destination for international tourists, comparing contemporary circumstances with those existing 50 years ago when full independence was attained.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology is adopted and findings are derived from the analysis of materials in the public domain.

Findings

Function as a tourist destination cannot be understood without an appreciation of a place’s history and evolving general economic, political and socio-cultural conditions. These determine opportunities and constraints and thus the character and image of the destination from a tourism industry perspective. Singapore is shown to have undergone transformation as a country and consequently as a tourist centre under the leadership of a strong government which has brought prosperity to the now highly urbanised and industrialised city state. Achievements are considerable, although the future is one of some uncertainty as the wider context continues to change in ways which pose new challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s core argument is that performance as a destination cannot be separated from broader circumstances demonstrated by comparisons of Singapore’s tourism in 1965 and 2015 and the political, economic, socio-cultural and environmental contexts of the two periods.

Originality/value

While possessing many unique attributes related to its defining characteristics, the republic’s experiences afford valuable insights into the dynamics of destination development and especially in nations which are young, small and rapidly modernising.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Low Sui Pheng and Christopher H.Y. Leong

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai Baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many…

Abstract

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai Baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many countries in Asia, including Singapore. One of the arguments that has been put forward to explain the financial crisis in Asia relates to the Asian style of management, which purportedly includes kinsmanship and guanxi or family connections. This paper seeks to discover whether the Asian management style is significantly different from the western style of management. This is achieved through a case study in construction project management for a typical family‐run building firm in Singapore. Field observations on the construction site suggest that the style of management in Asia can be related to modern management theories from the West.

Details

Work Study, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Janet C.N. Wee and Alton Y.K. Chua

The objectives of this study are two-fold. The first is to examine the peculiarities of KM processes that are unique in SMEs from three perspectives, namely knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this study are two-fold. The first is to examine the peculiarities of KM processes that are unique in SMEs from three perspectives, namely knowledge creation, knowledge sharing and knowledge reuse. Secondly, to identify enablers and impediments of these KM processes that influence the competitiveness of SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study approach involving 21 participants comprising management staff and front-line employees from four Singaporean SMEs.

Findings

The SME owner, rather than the employees, was found to be the key source and creator of knowledge and the sole driver of the KM processes. In SMEs, knowledge creation takes the form of innovative customized solutions to meet customers' needs; knowledge sharing occurs through cross functionality, overlapping roles, and facilitated by close physical proximity in open workspaces; and knowledge reuse is often made tacitly, where common knowledge is prevalently embedded within the KM processes of SMEs. The enablers of knowledge creation process rested largely on the owner's innovativeness, creativity and ability to acquire knowledge of the industry. Knowledge sharing processes are enabled by the awareness of roles, mutual respect and the level of trust among employees within the SME while knowledge reuse is fostered by close proximity of employees and the willingness and openness of the owner to impart his knowledge. The lack of the above enablement factors mentioned will hinder these KM processes.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the fact that data was collected from four SMEs in Singapore. Furthermore, only a small sample of staff from these SMEs was interviewed. Hence the findings need to be interpreted in light of such a scope.

Practical implications

For SMEs, this research provides perspectives on the factors influencing KM processes, in particular, the importance of the owners' knowledge and leadership, the flexibility and adaptability of the organization, and open culture to enable the capitalization of its knowledge assets to survive and stay competitive. For practitioners, this paper reinforces the importance of the management owners' innovativeness, initiatives and support, and the level of social interaction and high level of trusts among employees in the SMEs to as enablers to effective KM processes in SMEs.

Originality/value

To deepen on-going knowledge management research on SMEs, this paper provides insights and rich context to the distinctness of KM processes in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2013

Tzu-Bin Lin and Li-Yi Wang

This chapter aims to explore representations of information literacy and media literacy in Singapore’s educational discourse as part of its 21st century skills framework…

Abstract

This chapter aims to explore representations of information literacy and media literacy in Singapore’s educational discourse as part of its 21st century skills framework. Currently, information literacy and media literacy co-exist in Singapore’s education discourse but there is no related work attempting to clarify these two concepts in Singapore or to bridge them to propose an overarching framework. In what ways are these two terminologies identical or different in the local education context? We try to answer this question through reviewing relevant official documents. We start with a review the literature on the global scale regarding information literacy and media literacy. Then, we focus on Singapore to explore how various governmental agencies defining information literacy and media literacy. This chapter, in other words, is a result from a pilot study to understand how information literacy and media literacy is defined and understood in Singapore’s education system.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Low Sui Pheng and Serena S.Y. Wong

Following the implementation of conservation programmes in Singapore’s built environment over the last two decades, much attention was paid to the concept plans and…

Abstract

Following the implementation of conservation programmes in Singapore’s built environment over the last two decades, much attention was paid to the concept plans and rationale behind these programmes. There were few studies which examine the managerial and technological issues associated with conservation projects. Most conservation projects in Singapore relate to the restoration of two‐ and three‐storey pre‐war shophouses in densely populated areas. Using the Chinatown pilot project as a case study, highlights the complex operations involved as well as the management approach adopted to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in the project. Suggests that conservation is demanding and requires close co‐operation between members of the building team.

Details

Property Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Angela R. Dobele, Michael Gangemi, Foula Kopanidis and Stuart Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to examine a University's at risk program and ask is the intervention strategy working? The program seeks to assist at risk students who may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a University's at risk program and ask is the intervention strategy working? The program seeks to assist at risk students who may be experiencing difficulties transitioning, for example from school into university. The program also seeks to identify problems and suggest remediation strategies before attrition.

Design/methodology/approach

The effectiveness of the at risk programs is investigated across a population of at risk students from 2006 to 2010. Effectiveness is judged on the basis of outcomes in subsequent semesters where the University's preferred outcome is these students are not identified as at risk again.

Findings

The authors have found that the program has some success in assisting students to improve their academic performance; though simply engaging in the process is not enough to ensure improvement. Other variables are at work. At risk students located in Melbourne appear to be far more likely to be at risk again than those in Singapore.

Research limitations/implications

The at risk program is intended to be part of the University's total system of pastoral care. As such it is designed to assist struggling students to successfully complete their studies. With this in mind, this paper has investigated the influence of student engagement in the at risk program on future academic performance.

Practical implications

This research assists Universities’ implementation of pastoral care programs and notes the roles of student characteristics in “success” at University.

Originality/value

To the authors’ understanding no other research of this kind has been conducted. Much of the previous research focuses on attrition, students already lost to a program. This research focuses on those not yet lost to a program, but at risk.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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