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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

Abdel Bari I. Durra and Abubakr M. Buera

The HRD profession is witnessing a revolution in its philosophy, programmes and methods. Training methods used in management education and training are either traditional…

Abstract

The HRD profession is witnessing a revolution in its philosophy, programmes and methods. Training methods used in management education and training are either traditional, such as lectures, or modern, such as role playing or case methods. Lectures are only a method of transferring knowledge to adult learners. Modern training methods help adult learners to build their skills and develop their attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Kavous Ardalan

The purpose of this paper is to see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to setting course goals, objectives, and contents.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to setting course goals, objectives, and contents.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the premise that foundational philosophies, worldviews, or paradigms underlie educational philosophies, and each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn implies a certain way or method of instruction.

Findings

The findings of this paper are that each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn determines not only the way that the instruction is performed but also how course goals, objectives, and contents are set.

Research limitations/implications

This paper implies that differences between the underlying world views of lecture and case methods of teaching similarly lead to differences in many other aspects of the teaching and learning process.

Practical implications

This paper implies that in practice, faculty would set their course goals, objectives, and contents in a more consistent manner if they become consciously aware of the underlying philosophy of their teaching method.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is that it shows how in a systematic manner the differences in teaching philosophy lead to differences in what faculty would do in all areas of their course activities: goals, objectives, and contents.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

David Jennings

Reports the results of a survey of UK lecturers involved in teaching strategic management to postgraduate and post‐experience students. Identifies the lecturer’s…

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7350

Abstract

Reports the results of a survey of UK lecturers involved in teaching strategic management to postgraduate and post‐experience students. Identifies the lecturer’s objectives in using case studies and evaluates the effectiveness of the case method in achieving those objectives. Finds that the method is successful in achieving participation and in developing communication and interpersonal skills, but less successful in the development of strategic analysis. Finds that a wide range of other methods are used in the teaching of strategic management, and that these methods can be used partly to replace and also to complement the use of case.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Martin Joseph Guillot and Steve C McCool

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of numerical boundary condition implementation on local error and convergence in L2-norm of a finite volume…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of numerical boundary condition implementation on local error and convergence in L2-norm of a finite volume discretization of the transient heat conduction equation subject to several boundary conditions, and for cases with volumetric heat generation, using both fully implicit and Crank-Nicolson time discretizations. The goal is to determine which combination of numerical boundary condition implementation and time discretization produces the most accurate solutions with the least computational effort.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper studies several benchmark cases including constant temperature, convective heating, constant heat flux, time-varying heat flux, and volumetric heating, and compares the convergence rates and local to analytical or semi-analytical solutions.

Findings

The Crank-Nicolson method coupled with second-order expression for the boundary derivatives produces the most accurate solutions on the coarsest meshes with the least computation times. The Crank-Nicolson method allows up to 16X larger time step for similar accuracy, with nearly negligible additional computational effort compared with the implicit method.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by researchers writing similar codes for quantitative guidance concerning the effect of various numerical boundary condition approximations for a large class of boundary condition types for two common time discretization methods.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive study of accuracy and convergence of the finite volume discretization for a wide range of benchmark cases and common time discretization methods.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Kavous Ardalan

To see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

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1070

Abstract

Purpose

To see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the premise that foundational philosophies, worldviews or paradigms underlie educational philosophies, and each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn implies a certain way or method of instruction.

Findings

The findings of this paper are that each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn determines not only the way that the instruction is performed but also how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

Research limitations/implications

This paper implies that differences between the underlying world views of lecture and case methods of teaching similarly lead to differences in many other aspects of the teaching and learning process.

Practical implications

This paper implies that, in practice, faculty would perform their teaching, research, and service in a more consistent manner if they become consciously aware of the underlying philosophy of their teaching method.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is that it shows how in a systematic manner the differences in teaching philosophy lead to differences in what faculty do in all areas of their activities: teaching, research, and service.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Case study
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Marlene M. Reed and Rochelle Reed Brunson

The purpose of this research is to identify studies that had been undertaken to determine the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method in…

Abstract

Synopsis

The purpose of this research is to identify studies that had been undertaken to determine the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method in an academic setting. An extensive search of secondary sources to identify research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of case teaching as compared to the lecture method. The findings of this study indicate within the research reviewed the following positive results of case teaching noted by students: enhanced learning of the subject; heightened student engagement in the classroom; and the receipt of higher grades in some disciplines. The following negative results are also found: lack of understanding of course content and the method is more challenging and time consuming. In a national survey of faculty using the case method for the first time, the following positive outcomes of utilizing the case method were found: develops strong critical-thinking skills, greater retention of course material and more active engagement in the classroom. The limitations are the inconsistency of variables measured in the study and the small sample sizes. “Recommendations for further study include the use of larger sample sizes and a control group using the lecture method of teaching.”

Research methodology

An extensive search for all studies is performed in the classroom to evaluate and compare the use of the case method as compared to the lecture method of teaching.

Relevant courses and levels

The courses evaluated in the study are from a variety of disciplines in universities.

Theoretical bases

A review of research studies is performed to evaluate the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Colette Henry and Lene Foss

The purpose of this paper is to review the use of case method in entrepreneurship research, and to identify trends in its current application. A key objective of the paper…

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1686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the use of case method in entrepreneurship research, and to identify trends in its current application. A key objective of the paper is to lay the foundation for a future research agenda by critically reviewing relevant literatures and offering insights into the use of case method in particular settings. The paper also helps identify areas where case method could add value to research findings in future scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a Boolean search, a systematic literature review (SLR) was undertaken across the “big five” entrepreneurship journals in the five-year period between 2008 and 2012. The search initially yielded a total of 269 “hits”. Following exclusion criteria, the list was refined to a total of 52 empirical papers, and these were reviewed using a comprehensive reading guide developed by the authors.

Findings

The paper finds that relatively few articles published in the “big five” entrepreneurship journals use case method, despite repeated calls in the literature for more in-depth, qualitative approaches. This potentially suggests that case method is not fully accepted as a legitimate or sufficiently rigorous approach in the upper echelons of contemporary published entrepreneurship scholarship. Overall the paper argues for greater acceptance of the use of case method amongst the academic community, alongside greater confidence in its application. This can be achieved by learning from other disciplines where the case approach is more established.

Research limitations/implications

While a comprehensive SLR was undertaken, the search was restricted to a limited time period and across a limited number of top tier journals.

Practical implications

The paper highlights incidents where case method has been used successfully, identifies gaps in the literature and contributes towards setting a future research agenda that should be of particular value to qualitative researchers.

Originality/value

The paper builds on extant literatures by furthering our understanding of the use of case method in entrepreneurship research. It should be of value to qualitative scholars applying case method in their empirical work, as well as those seeking to extend their methodological reach beyond a purely quantitative orientation.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Bob Lillis and Marek Szwejczewski

The purpose of this paper is to close the gap between theoretical approaches to strategic operations auditing and empirical analysis of practice in service organisations…

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2018

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to close the gap between theoretical approaches to strategic operations auditing and empirical analysis of practice in service organisations. Through analysis of the two different views of strategy formulation – environment‐market and resource‐based – the paper aims to provide insights on how strategic operations audit methods are being used and under what circumstances.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study methodology was employed which involved a three‐stage data collection and analytical process. Its purpose was to identify how strategic operations audit methods were being used, why they were used and the particular circumstances of their use. Trails of operational improvement within each of six case studies show links between service operational activities, the benefits achieved by the improvements and the formulation and/or execution of each service company's business strategy. These trails of improvement provided a means by which to reveal some of the strategic operations audit methods being used. In addition, interviews and analysis of supporting documentation ensured the complete set of methods being utilised was identified.

Findings

The results indicate three main findings. First it is recognised that the service companies all look to adopt a top down approach to strategic operations auditing and seek to maintain, and where possible, gain greater strategic impact from their service operations. Second, the competitive state of the business impacts the choice of strategic operations audit method used. All companies studied employed an environment‐market method to assess operations – market fit. Only when a company is confident of its competitive position will managers then look to also devise a resource‐based method in order to assess its current ability to nurture new capabilities to exploit. Third, companies use a variety of integration techniques to verify on‐going cohesion across infrastructural decision‐making categories of the content of service operations strategy. The assessment of cohesion within service operations strategy takes place within subsets of the content of the strategy. The authors did not find integration techniques that hone structural decision categories or service operations strategy as a whole. The results also show that methods used by managers are pale imitations of the rigorous procedures originally devised by researchers.

Practical implications

Service operations managers possess inadequate understanding of how the application of a strategic operations audit method should be made and limited ability to undertake the audit in a structured and meaningful way. A strategic operations audit methods selection process is put forward to remedy this. The process acknowledges that the choice of a particular method is contingent on the stage of development of the company's service operations strategy. It guides managers through the decision‐making process of what strategic operations audit method to use and when managers should be using it. The message for academics is that new resource‐based methods need to be created that are accessible to managers and relevant when service operations strategy has successfully evolved to the point where greater influence is being sought from it in the formulation of business strategy.

Originality/value

An empirical study within service operations management of the practice of strategic operations auditing is rare. The paper's findings begin to address the gap between theory and practice. The paper presents revisions and additions to the operations manager's tool kit of strategic operations audit methods and culminates in a selection process to guide managers on which tool to use and when.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Alberto Lusoli

This paper aims to explore the early days of business education with the aim of understanding how the Harvard Business School (HBS) contributed to the constitution of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the early days of business education with the aim of understanding how the Harvard Business School (HBS) contributed to the constitution of “management” as a science-based profession. The research focuses on HBS signature pedagogy, the case method and its role in the institutionalization of managerial knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a qualitative content analysis of HBS Annals published between 1908 and 1930. Through a manual coding of the Annals, the paper traces the diffusion of the case method in the curriculum and connects it with the institutional transformations that took place between 1908 and 1930.

Findings

The data show how HBS curriculum transitioned from lectures to case teaching in the aftermath of First World War. This pedagogy allowed HBS to demonstrate the possibility of systematically investigate management problems and to deliver business education at scale. The discussion argues that the case method, acting as a boundary object between business praxis and management theories, constituted management as a science-based profession.

Originality/value

Recent debates have emerged about case method’s ability to critically question socio-economic structures within which business is conducted. This paper contributes to the debate arguing that the historical and institutional factors leading to the affirmation of this pedagogical approach had a substantive role in the type of knowledge produced through its application. The findings challenge the idea that the affirmation of the case method is attributable to its epistemological primacy in investigating business problems.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Alolote Amadi

This study demonstrates integration within a mixed-methods case study of construction phenomena, whilst ensuring reliability and validity. This is in view of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study demonstrates integration within a mixed-methods case study of construction phenomena, whilst ensuring reliability and validity. This is in view of the established philosophical challenges in theory generation, whereby qualitative and quantitative methods are underpinned by divergent, almost incompatible, paradigmic assumptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a sample case study research on the phenomenon of cost overruns, supported by a coherent flow of well-articulated philosophical arguments to idealise the logic of integration. Issues of reliability and validity were resolved along these lines, by incorporating applicable criteria from both the qualitative and qualitative strands. A detailed outline and rationalisation of the stepwise approach to achieving integration are provided, from the point of design conceptualisation, data collection, analysis and further down to theory generation.

Findings

The study generated two level-1 theories by collecting numerical data on cost overruns, geotechnical index parameters and textual data on the geotechnical practices. Another level-1 theory was generated in reflexive adaptation to unanticipated social constructs emerging from the qualitative data. All level-1 theories from the quantitative and qualitative strands were triangulated to yield two “level-2 theories”: A log-regression model and a cognitive map. The approach to integration is thus explanatory sequential, and concurrent (at the second stage of transformation in the generation of level-2 theories).

Research limitations/implications

The study empirically reinforces that ontological flexibility, achievable through the use of thoughtfully designed integrated mixed-methods case studies, permits the investigation of multidimensional construction phenomena in innovative ways, relevant to provide holistic theoretical and practice-based contributions.

Originality/value

The study practically signposts a bespoke stepwise approach to integration, in a mixed-methods case study of construction phenomena, against the contextual backdrop of its relative novelty and lack of studies delving in-depth into the theoretical nitty-gritty.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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