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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Ahmed Bounfour, Hannu Piekkola and Carter Bloch

Abstract

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Jennifer Koenig Johnson

Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to cite and briefly discuss digital map collections. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Digital map collections were located…

Abstract

Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to cite and briefly discuss digital map collections. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Digital map collections were located, evaluated, and selected. Collections included in the annotated bibliography consist primarily of maps that originated in print, or contain historical maps, or are unique. Each included collection meets at least one of those criteria. Findings ‐ There are a wide variety of resources available online that users can freely access. This annotated bibliography focuses specifically on digital collections that contain cartographic materials. Each item, after being evaluated, includes a citation, brief description, and usage instructions. Originality/value ‐ While there are many digital collections available for users to access that focus primarily on the manuscript and photograph formats, there are a variety of other formats that are also digitized, such as cartographic materials. This annotated bibliography highlights 40 collections that were located, evaluated, and described. Most of these collections originate in print materials, while at least one collection focuses specifically on digitally born maps. All maps collections are housed and created by institutions or organizations in the USA, while the content ranges in subjects, date ranges, and geographic locations.

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Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Kristof Van Criekingen

Having a short throughput time for innovation projects, i.e. lead-time, can put firms in an advantageous position. The time that lapses between a project’s start and its…

Abstract

Purpose

Having a short throughput time for innovation projects, i.e. lead-time, can put firms in an advantageous position. The time that lapses between a project’s start and its completion, is influenced not only by the firm's internal capabilities but also by how the firm connects to external knowledge. This paper assesses the relation between knowledge sourcing and lead-time advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper empirically tests the relation between external knowledge sourcing and lead-time advantage based on firm level Community Innovation Survey (CIS) data.

Findings

I find that breadth and depth of the external knowledge sourcing are positively relating to lead-time advantage, albeit with diminishing returns. Investment into absorptive capacity, i.e. internal R&D, mitigates the diminishing of returns. Firms directing their external knowledge sourcing strategy toward consumers, suppliers and science are better able to capitalize on their innovations through lead-time advantages and firms also benefit from the special case of collaboration for product development.

Originality/value

The conceptual novelty of this research largely consists in empirically bringing together for the first time conceptualizations of external knowledge sourcing and the strategic use of lead-time. Given the prevalence of both concepts in the modern and fast changing economy, investigating this link is of great importance.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Carita Mirjami Eklund

High-growth firms generate a large share of new jobs and are thus the key drivers of innovation and industry dynamics. As the employees' education supports innovation and…

Abstract

Purpose

High-growth firms generate a large share of new jobs and are thus the key drivers of innovation and industry dynamics. As the employees' education supports innovation and productivity, this article hypothesizes that employee competences explain high growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The study approaches this by examining intangible capital and specialized knowledge to evaluate how these characteristics support the probability of becoming a high-growth firm. The estimation uses linked employer–employee data from Danish registers from 2005 to 2013.

Findings

As the authors measure high growth with the size-neutral Birch index, they can examine the determinants of high growth across different firm size classes. The findings imply that intangible capital relates positively to the firm's high growth.

Originality/value

Previous research on high-growth firms is concentrated on the owners’ education. This article broadens to the high education of all employees and accounts for the employees’ occupation and capitalization of knowledge with intangible capital.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Kelly Carter

The purpose of this paper is to measure the effect of superstar gig workers, defined as independent contractors who are the most successful in their field, on shareholder…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the effect of superstar gig workers, defined as independent contractors who are the most successful in their field, on shareholder value. Gig workers comprise as much as 33% of the workforce and are projected to exceed 50% by 2028. Thus, understanding their impact on shareholder value is important.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses OLS regression analysis. To establish causality regarding wealth effects, the sudden deaths of superstar gig workers are used. To facilitate the uncontaminated measurement of wealth effects, sudden deaths that coincide with a significant event on a [−3, 3] window about the death event are not used.

Findings

The sudden death of a superstar gig worker causes shareholder wealth to increase significantly by 0.35% or almost $1.5m. Rational and behavioral explanations are offered for this result.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability is limited because data on superstar gig workers in traditional corporations are unavailable. For this reason, this paper uses the only available data, namely, data on superstar wrestlers, who are contracted to perform in matches (i.e. “gigs”) in a lucrative promotion (e.g. World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)). Future research could examine the effect of corporate gig workers on shareholder value if the data become available at some point.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to document the effects of any type of gig worker, whether superstar or regular, on shareholder value.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Russell Williams

Consultants are never far from criticism not least because of the so‐called “consultobabble” used it is argued to hide their lack of objectivity or deficiencies in terms…

Abstract

Consultants are never far from criticism not least because of the so‐called “consultobabble” used it is argued to hide their lack of objectivity or deficiencies in terms of providing useful solutions to improve management processes. Utilising Erving Goffman’s role theory and the idea of conspicuous consumption to explore the client‐consultant relationship and the place of consultobabble within it, this paper suggests however that clients are not really so passive and exploited. Consultobabble is a product of a complex consultant‐client (supply and demand) relationship.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Kristin J. Wilson

The burgeoning practice of peer-to-peer breastmilk sharing in the United States conflicts with public health concerns about the safety of the milk. In-depth interviews…

Abstract

The burgeoning practice of peer-to-peer breastmilk sharing in the United States conflicts with public health concerns about the safety of the milk. In-depth interviews with 58 breastmilk sharers highlight the ways in which these respondents counter widespread risk narratives. These caregivers deploy existing social values such as self-reliance, good citizenship, and “crunchy,” or natural, mothering to validate their milk-sharing practices. However, because of stratified reproduction, in which society encourages White motherhood while it disparages motherhood among poor women and women of color, these discourses are more accessible to milk sharers who are White and from middle-class. Black and Latinx milk donors and recipients offer additional rationale for milk sharing that includes reclaiming their legacies as worthy mothers and elevating milk sharing to justice work. In rejecting and reframing risk, all of these milk sharers work toward flattening the good mother/bad mother binary.

Details

Marginalized Mothers, Mothering from the Margins
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-400-8

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Aaron C. Ahuvia

This paper argues for the following sensitizing proposition. At its core, much of consumer behavior that involves brand meanings is an attempt to influence, or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper argues for the following sensitizing proposition. At its core, much of consumer behavior that involves brand meanings is an attempt to influence, or symbolically mark, interpersonal relationships.

Methodology/approach

This paper presents a conceptual argument based on a literature review.

Findings

First, I argue that our pervasive concern with other people is a basic genetic component of human beings, and discuss some possible evolutionary pressures that may have led to this result. Then I discuss how this pervasive concern influences consumer behavior related to brand meanings. This discussion is structured around two aspects of social relationships: interpersonal closeness and social status. Relationship closeness is discussed with regard to brand communities, gifts, special possessions and brand love, and the often hidden ways that social relationships permeate everyday consumer behavior. Social status is discussed with reference to materialism. Materialism is sometimes misunderstood as an obsession with physical object, or as occurring when people care more about products than they do about people. In contrast, I argue that materialism is better understood as a style of relating to people.

Originality/value

This paper integrates a range of disparate findings in support of a broadly applicable generalization that nothing matters more to people than other people. This generalization can function as a sensitizing proposition that managers and researchers can bear in mind as they seek to interpret and understand how brand meaning influences consumer behavior.

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Katarina Hellén and Johanna Gummerus

Service scholars have questioned the usefulness of the concept of tangibility/intangibility as a characteristic of services for two reasons: first, it is ambiguous and…

Abstract

Purpose

Service scholars have questioned the usefulness of the concept of tangibility/intangibility as a characteristic of services for two reasons: first, it is ambiguous and does not differentiate between services and goods; and second, because all offerings, despite their characteristics, render service to customers. Consequently, scholars have suggested discarding the concept altogether. The purpose of this paper is to subject the concept to critical evaluation and argue that tangibility/intangibility is useful, because it influences consumers' experiences with offerings. In this paper, the authors argue that it is necessary to re‐conceptualise tangibility/intangibility to overcome the previous critique.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw upon empirical research from the service marketing and psychology literature in order to advance knowledge on the nature of tangibility/intangibility and its influence on the formation of consumer experiences.

Findings

It is proposed that tangibility/intangibility should be investigated from a consumer perspective, rather than an inherent characteristic in offerings. Also, it is shown that the concept is relevant for understanding consumer experience formation at different stages of the purchase process.

Originality/value

The paper provides propositions on the conceptualization of tangibility/intangibility and its relationship with pre‐, ongoing use and post‐purchase consumer experiences. The authors call for caution in dismissing tangibility/intangibility as a concept in the service marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Dennis B. Arnett and Debra A. Laverie

The purpose of this research is to investigate four factors (fan identity salience, satisfaction, attachment, and enduring involvement) to assess their ability to…

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to investigate four factors (fan identity salience, satisfaction, attachment, and enduring involvement) to assess their ability to differentiate among three types of fans (frequent, moderately frequent, and infrequent attendees). A convenience sample of college fans of a university woman's basketball team is used. The results suggest both identity salience and enduring involvement may be useful as segmentation variables for sports marketers

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

1 – 10 of 112