Search results

1 – 10 of 381
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto

Revisiting Carroll’s classic corporate social responsibility (CSR) pyramid framework, this paper aims to evolve a novel synthesis of ethics and economics. This yielded an…

Abstract

Purpose

Revisiting Carroll’s classic corporate social responsibility (CSR) pyramid framework, this paper aims to evolve a novel synthesis of ethics and economics. This yielded an “integrative CSR economics”.

Design/methodology/approach

This theory paper examined how to conceptually set up CSR theory, argue its ethical nature and establish its practical, social and empirical relevance. Economic analysis reached out from contemporary institutional economics to Smith’s classic studies.

Findings

The paper reconstructed all of Carroll’s four dimensions of CSR – economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities – through economics. The paper discounted a core assumption of much CSR research that economic approach to CSR, including the instrumental, strategic “business case” approach to CSR, were unethical and lacked any foundations in ethics theory. Integrative CSR economics reframes research on viability and capability requirements for CSR practice; redirecting empirical research on links between CSP (corporate social performance) and CFP (corporate financial performance).

Research limitations/implications

The paper focused on Carroll as the leading champion of CSR research. Future research needs to align other writers with integrative CSR economics. Friedman or Freeman, or the historic contributions of Dodd, Mayo, Bowen or Drucker, are especially interesting.

Practical implications

The paper set out how integrative CSR economics satisfies the “business case” approach to CSR and develops practical implications along: a systemic dimension of the market economy; a legal-constitutional dimension; and the dimension of market exchanges.

Social implications

Integrative CSR economics creates ethical benefits for society along: a systemic dimension of the market (mutual gains); a legal-constitutional dimension (law-following); and the dimension of market exchange (ethical capital creation). Social benefits are not only aspired to but also are achievable as a business case approach to CSR is followed.

Originality/value

The paper’s main contribution is a new synthesis of economics and ethics that yields an “integrative CSR economics”.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

William Acar, Kenneth E. Aupperle and Ronald M. Lowy

This large‐scale exploratory research explores the manner in which various organizational types view their social obligations in terms of the tradeoffs (or potential…

Abstract

This large‐scale exploratory research explores the manner in which various organizational types view their social obligations in terms of the tradeoffs (or potential symbioses) between economic and non‐economic (social) goals. Historically, this issue has been researched only in the context of business firms. Given the increased scope and visibility of nonprofit organizations, it becomes particularly relevant to explore a broad range of organizational types. To proceed with this research, this study proposes a 5‐class typology describing the organizational spectrum from the fully for‐profit to the fully nonprofit organizations. This paper also contributes to the emerging empirical research stream in the area by undertaking a systematic assessment of the way in which all organizational types value their economic versus social orientations as gauged by several measures. Across the two top executive levels, a regular progression of statistically significant differences are found between the five organizational types with respect to their social and economic orientations. A by‐product of this research is that we reveal how the economic or social orientation of organizations can be systematically investigated by undertaking large‐scale empirical studies with appropriately designed research instruments.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, John Milliman and Anthony Lucas

This paper aims to explore the sequential effects of employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR), organizational identification (OI), higher-order…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the sequential effects of employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR), organizational identification (OI), higher-order quality-of-work-life (HQWL) and intention to stay (IS).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey responses were gathered from employees of a casino hotel company in the USA. All hypotheses were tested via structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results demonstrated that ethical and philanthropic CSR dimensions had significant direct effects on OI and indirect effects on HQWL via OI. OI had positive effects on HQWL (directly) and IS (directly and indirectly via HQWL). Both ethical and philanthropic CSR dimensions indirectly influenced IS via OI and HQWL, while economic CSR had a significant indirect effect on IS via HQWL.

Research limitations/implications

This study addressed the lack of theory-driven empirical work on the relationship between CSR and employee retention by presenting new insights into how different dimensions of CSR can contribute for improving employee HQWL and IS via OI based on social identity theory (SIT) and social exchange theory (SET). In this study, the results may not generalize to other countries and cultures because the data arises from a casino hotel in the USA.

Practical implications

Based on the results, hospitality companies can improve employee OI, HQWL and IS by more effectively implementing different types of CSR programs.

Originality/value

This study provided support for the positive influence of CSR initiatives on hospitality employees in a controversial sector (i.e. casino hotels) in which there is a lack of empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nitha Palakshappa and Suzanne Grant

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social enterprise (SE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Both terms are regarded as pivotal but somewhat…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social enterprise (SE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Both terms are regarded as pivotal but somewhat related when discussed in scholarship. Despite this few attempts have been made to isolate the manner in which they connect.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors attempt to unpack these two terms in order to isolate key areas of overlap in their use and operationalization. In doing so, the authors address the call for work to synthesize the highly fragmented literature.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that, while SE and CSR retain a unique place in the business-society landscape, there is indeed an overlap between the two. The generation of value – social, collaborative, or strategic – appears to be a central theme that connects the two concepts.

Originality/value

The authors offer a detailed discussion of how SE and CSR have contributed to scholarship, and demonstrate that the two terms are indeed interrelated on many levels.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kamarudeen Babatunde Bello, Ahmad Jusoh and Khalil Md Nor

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to examine the effects of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on service quality, satisfaction and repurchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to examine the effects of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on service quality, satisfaction and repurchase intention; second, to investigate the mediating (unique and serial) effects of service quality and satisfaction; and third, to determine the moderating effects of consumer rights awareness (CRA) on the relationship between perceived CSR and consumer responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from a sample of 604 customers of the 4 major mobile telecommunications companies in Nigeria. The partial least squares structural equation modeling approach was used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

Research findings indicate that perceived CSR has direct and positive effects on service quality, satisfaction and repurchase intention. Also, service quality and satisfaction mediates (uniquely and in sequence) the effect of perceived CSR on repurchase intention. In addition, CRA moderates perceived CSR’s effect on service quality perceptions and repurchase intention.

Practical implications

The findings confirm the complementary relationships between CSR, service quality and satisfaction in influencing consumers’ repurchase intention. Managers should imbibe CSR as an intangible attribute that complements high-quality services, leading to enhanced customer satisfaction and repurchase intentions. The findings also suggest that CRA enhances perceived CSR’s effect on service quality perceptions and repurchase intentions. Thus, managers should take proactive steps to inform consumers of their rights, and also show efforts at protecting the same.

Originality/value

This study has overcome the limitation observed in previous studies by testing the sequential mediating effects of service quality and customer satisfaction in the perceived CSR–consumer response relationships. Also, this study represents a pioneering effort at empirically confirming the role of CRA in enhancing perceived CSR’s influence on consumer responses. In addition, the findings also provide insights on the impact of CSR on consumer behavior from a developing country’s perspective.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jens Blumrodt, Michel Desbordes and Dominique Bodin

The subject of CSR is nowadays widely discussed, as is its relevance to the sport entertainment industry. The objective of this research was to investigate corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

The subject of CSR is nowadays widely discussed, as is its relevance to the sport entertainment industry. The objective of this research was to investigate corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions in the professional European football league and its impact on clubs’ brand image.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this research discusses some particular points of the world's biggest sport entertainment, which is soccer. Then a definition of the meaning of CSR for this particular sector will be outlined. The CSR values adopted by sport clubs are observed in first division football in France. This approach has been combined with brand theories.

Findings

The specific research protocol evaluates consumers’ perceptions. The method which is developed measures and analyses the impact of CSR commitment on spectators’ brand perception. In linking CSR to brand image, two managerial viewpoints are discussed. CSR is synonymous with a company's social and ethical commitment. Brand theories outline the nature of brand equity. The authors apply these two complementary considerations to professional football clubs and argue that Keller's model of customer‐based brand equity has to be reconsidered for football clubs.

Practical implications

This research highlights that CSR has to become part of management strategies.

Originality/value

The authors draw attention to the argument that the professional sport entertainment industry requires a specific CSR management strategy which goes beyond the local level or the operational level of one single club. These clubs have to perform well in competition. But, as in no other industry, they have also to be “good” brands.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Morgan R. Clevenger and Cynthia J. MacGregor

A discussion of three key articles will highlight this chapter on corporate social responsibility: van Marrewijk's (2003) concepts and definitions of CSR and corporate…

Abstract

A discussion of three key articles will highlight this chapter on corporate social responsibility: van Marrewijk's (2003) concepts and definitions of CSR and corporate sustainability, Munilla and Miles's (2005) CSR continuum as a component of stakeholder theory, and Garriga and Melé's (2004) CSR theories. The chapter discusses stakeholder value chains and a reactive approach to dealing with community needs, employee volunteerism, and strict strategic behaviors.

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yaowalak Poolthong and Rujirutana Mandhachitara

This paper aims to explore how social responsibility initiatives can influence perceived service quality and brand effect from the perspective of retail banking customers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how social responsibility initiatives can influence perceived service quality and brand effect from the perspective of retail banking customers in Bangkok, Thailand. The paper also aims to examine the impact of trust as a mediating variable between perceived service quality and brand effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative in nature, using the responses of 275 bank customers to a closed‐end questionnaire administered on a face‐to‐face basis by trained fieldworkers. The data analysis is performed by partial least squares (PLS), a second generation statistical SEM variance‐based modeling technique.

Findings

The results of the study demonstrate how corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influence service quality perceptions and also examine CSR's impact on trust and affective attitudes of customers towards their banks. The study's hypothesized relationships were principally supported, i.e. perceived service quality is positively associated with brand effect mediated by trust. CSR initiatives play an important role in perceived service quality, which in turn, influences trust and brand effect. Finally, CSR is shown to be directly related to brand effect.

Research limitations/implications

While the results are clear and have strong salience to the retail banking industry in Thailand, applications of the findings beyond Thailand should take into account other factors such as the nature of retail banking industry, the perception, behavior and demographics of retail banking customers as well as the strategic focus of retail banking toward CSR.

Practical implications

The study provides a set of findings relating to CSR initiatives that could be readily incorporated into a bank's corporate plan.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, their study proposes an exhaustive review of CSR activities a company could use to best match its stakeholders' interests. Also the paper demonstrates the contribution of advanced modeling methodology to understanding key relationships in the financial services sector.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rujirutana Mandhachitara and Yaowalak Poolthong

This paper aims to examine the roles of corporate social responsibility (a non service‐related concept) and perceived service quality (a service‐related concept) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the roles of corporate social responsibility (a non service‐related concept) and perceived service quality (a service‐related concept) in determining the attitudinal and behavioral loyalty of customers in the retail banking sector in Bangkok, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative in nature using the responses of 275 bank customers who answered a survey questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using partial least squares (PLS), a variance‐based structural equation modeling method.

Findings

The results of the study demonstrate that corporate social responsibility (CSR) has a significantly strong and positive association with attitudinal loyalty. Perceived service quality mediated the relationship between CSR and repeat patronage intentions (behavioral loyalty). Direct effects were reported between perceived service quality and both attitudinal and behavioral loyalty. A positive relationship between attitudinal and behavioral loyalty was demonstrated.

Research limitations/implications

While the results are clear and have strong salience for the retail banking industry, future research should take into account the specific industry context within the national culture.

Practical implications

The study provides a set of findings relating to CSR initiatives and perception of service quality that could be readily incorporated into banks' corporate strategic plans.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates an empirical operationalization of CSR initiatives measured from the customers' point of view, and from which banks could learn for corporate strategy development.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Muhammad Bilal Zafar and Ahmad Azam Sulaiman

This paper aims to understand corporate social responsibility (CSR) narrative under the Islamic banking paradigm by three aspects, narrative review of the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand corporate social responsibility (CSR) narrative under the Islamic banking paradigm by three aspects, narrative review of the literature, review of the definitions of CSR and review of factors that cause divergence from conventional percepts.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theoretical paper based on literature and aims to understand the CSR narrative under the paradigm of Islamic banking.

Findings

Religion brings new dimensions of ethics and expands the scope of morality in business. Islamic banking is a new wave of corporation whose social goals are as much important as making profit. There are diverse narrations and definitions prevailing in the literature of CSR under the Islamic paradigm which also encounters the aspects of divergence from conventional percepts. The academic debate of CSR-Islamic banking brings on surface a plausible CSR paradigm, that is to guide the role of Islamic banking in society under the Islamic provisions, ethics and axioms. This paper also paves the way for future direction, particularly in terms of a holistic understanding of CSR narrative under the Islamic banking paradigm.

Research limitations/implications

This is a theoretical paper; it primarily discusses the theoretical aspects of CSR narrative under the paradigm of Islamic banking, while it does not give insight into the empirical narrative or disclosure of CSR in Islamic banking.

Practical implications

The theoretical review of literature brings plausible understanding, that Islamic banking is a new wave of corporate and has standings on divine guidance. The structure of the institution in its foundation insists on real economic activity. The legitimacy of Islamic banking has roots in ethical compliance and in inculcating the broader interests of stakeholders. There are several social responsibilities, which are expected from the practitioners of Islamic banking. The practitioners as well must understand that the CSR of Islamic banking is far beyond the conventional percepts of CSR.

Originality/value

There are several normative and theoretical studies in the domain of CSR-Islamic banking. It is hard to find a comprehensive narrative review of such literature. This review is unique, which brings a holistic understanding of CSR narrative under the Islamic banking paradigm.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

1 – 10 of 381