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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2023

Carri Reisdorf and Meghan Murray

One critical aspect of strong leadership communication is developing emotional (EQ) and spiritual intelligences (SQ). EQ helps individuals be more empathetic and effective, while…

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Abstract

Purpose

One critical aspect of strong leadership communication is developing emotional (EQ) and spiritual intelligences (SQ). EQ helps individuals be more empathetic and effective, while SQ promotes an understanding of impacts beyond oneself. This paper aims to explore the relationship between leadership communication and EQ and SQ. Corporations can leverage leaders with high EQ and SQ and/or provide EQ/SQ training to employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Using critical review and integration, the authors consolidate existing literature and best practices to explore, develop and propose strategies for integrating EQ and SQ into the workplace.

Findings

Building upon existing theory and literature, the authors present a model of understanding both EQ and SQ. A generalized four-step process is presented for building EQ/SQ capabilities within the firm.

Originality/value

This study explores the synergy between an employee’s leadership skills and the ability to exhibit EQ and SQ. This research can provide corporations with tangible and targeted ways to enhance their EQ and SQ in their leaders. Firms can improve leveraging individuals with high SQ, in addition to providing SQ training to employees to improve individuals’ SQ.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Beyond the Digital Divide: Contextualizing the Information Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-548-7

Abstract

Details

Older People in a Digitalized Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-167-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Päivi Rasi-Heikkinen

Abstract

Details

Older People in a Digitalized Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-167-2

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2023

Jenneke van den Velden and Bert M. Sadowski

The purpose of this paper is evaluate the public value of municipal Wi-Fi networks by examining their costs and benefits. Increasing attention has been focused on the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is evaluate the public value of municipal Wi-Fi networks by examining their costs and benefits. Increasing attention has been focused on the digital divide, i.e. inequalities in digital access, use and benefits, to a lesser extent on technologies providing opportunities to overcome these inequalities. Different theoretical traditions have approached the problem of the digital divide, this research represents a synthesis by combining a bottom-up approach to calculating the benefits of municipal Wi-Fi networks with an in-depth analysis of the digital divide in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

After a systematic literature review, the paper uses a bottom-up methodology to evaluate the public value of a municipal Wi-Fi network by quantifying its potential benefits and costs. In addition, it includes different types of users based on the access opportunities available to them. It develops different scenarios for these users depending on the connection alternatives and the digital skills available across European countries.

Findings

By using data from the euro-28, the paper shows that, in general, the private value of a municipal Wi-Fi network is negative, the public value is positive. However, a greater public value is depending on the extent to which the benefits can be attributed to expectations about the arrival and usage of e-government services.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the quantitative analysis, the authors suggest that municipal Wi-Fi networks can provide the potential to bridge the digital divide. To generate public value, these networks have to be driven by a strong need for e-government services.

Practical implications

However, important factors in the adoption of these services are related to digital skills available in the particular region.

Social implications

In addition, public investment is required to stimulate the growth of broadband infrastructure in a complementary manner to enable public wireless networks.

Originality/value

The paper combines new insights into the cost calculations of municipal Wi-Fi networks with socioeconomic data on digital skills to examine different types of users.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2023

Myojung Chung

While there has been a growing call for insights on algorithms given their impact on what people encounter on social media, it remains unknown how enhanced algorithmic knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

While there has been a growing call for insights on algorithms given their impact on what people encounter on social media, it remains unknown how enhanced algorithmic knowledge serves as a countermeasure to problematic information flow. To fill this gap, this study aims to investigate how algorithmic knowledge predicts people's attitudes and behaviors regarding misinformation through the lens of the third-person effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Four national surveys in the USA (N = 1,415), the UK (N = 1,435), South Korea (N = 1,798) and Mexico (N = 784) were conducted between April and September 2021. The survey questionnaire measured algorithmic knowledge, perceived influence of misinformation on self and others, intention to take corrective actions, support for government regulation and content moderation. Collected data were analyzed using multigroup SEM.

Findings

Results indicate that algorithmic knowledge was associated with presumed influence of misinformation on self and others to different degrees. Presumed media influence on self was a strong predictor of intention to take actions to correct misinformation, while presumed media influence on others was a strong predictor of support for government-led platform regulation and platform-led content moderation. There were nuanced but noteworthy differences in the link between presumed media influence and behavioral responses across the four countries studied.

Originality/value

These findings are relevant for grasping the role of algorithmic knowledge in countering rampant misinformation on social media, as well as for expanding US-centered extant literature by elucidating the distinctive views regarding social media algorithms and misinformation in four countries.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2024

Teemu Rantanen and Timo Toikko

With digitisation, a new kind of inequality has emerged in society between people and groups of people. A lack of digital inclusion creates challenges for the economic and social…

Abstract

Purpose

With digitisation, a new kind of inequality has emerged in society between people and groups of people. A lack of digital inclusion creates challenges for the economic and social development of society and citizen participation. This study analyses how the country-level cultural factors defined by Hofstede are associated with citizens' digital skills and internet usage and how they moderate the effects of age, gender, educational level and income level.

Design/methodology/approach

This comparative cross-sectional study examines digital inclusion in 22 European countries. Data from the European Social Survey (N = 37,602) are analysed using a two-level regression analysis.

Findings

The study found significant effects of demographic and socio-economic factors and country-level indulgence on digital skills and internet usage. In addition, the study shows that a high value on the indulgence index moderates the negative effect of age.

Originality/value

The digital divide has been studied widely with regard to individual-level influencing factors and international comparisons. The significance of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions in terms of digitisation and digital divides has also been confirmed in previous studies. However, there is a lack of analysis combining the effects of country-level culture and individual-level demographic and socio-economic factors on citizens' digital skills and internet usage. Generally, the research emphasises the significance of national culture in digital inclusion and especially in supporting the digital inclusion of older adults.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 44 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Najeh Aissaoui

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has exposed the digital divide (DD) like never before and has made it a hot topic of actuality. In this paper, a state of the art of research studies that…

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Abstract

Purpose

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has exposed the digital divide (DD) like never before and has made it a hot topic of actuality. In this paper, a state of the art of research studies that dealt with the three levels of the digital divide and highlight its shortcomings in light of COVID-19 are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative literature review was conducted, summarizing the rich literature on the digital divide by presenting its key concepts and findings. This study then provides suggestions for future research in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

It can be concluded that the digital divide is insufficiently exposed and examined by researchers. In fact, in recent years, very few research studies have focused on the first-level divide. Moreover, much of the literature has analyzed the second digital divide (in terms of e-skills) in the strict sense and at the national level. This review also shows that the existing studies on the third level-digital divide deal only with the individual results of using the Internet. Finally, future research on the three-level digital divide should study more digital inequality related to emerging technologies is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper draws up a state of art, which has important theoretical and practical implications in the effectiveness of full transformation to digitalization.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to digital inequality research by summarizing key concepts and findings from the literature of the three levels of the digital divide. It highlights the unexplored research topics on some dimensions of DD which were behind the digital transformation failure in many countries and provides insights on future research directions in light of COVID-19.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 71 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2023

Yuan Yi and Dickson K.W. Chiu

The impact of COVID-19 has led to a surge in the public’s reliance on the Internet for pandemic information, and the policy of home isolation has exacerbated this. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of COVID-19 has led to a surge in the public’s reliance on the Internet for pandemic information, and the policy of home isolation has exacerbated this. This study aimed to investigate public information needs and ways of accessing and disseminating information during COVID-19 in mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative research approach to conduct semi-structured interviews with 15 participants from 9 cities in mainland China about information needs and access behaviors during the COVID-19 outbreak. All interview recordings were converted into text and proofread, then coded and summarised in correspondence with the research questions using the grounded theory.

Findings

This study summarized the dynamics of public information needs during the 2.5-year pandemic and identified the difficulties in accessing certain information.

Originality/value

Although information needs of public health emergencies have been a hot topic during COVID-19, scant studies focus on information needs in specific countries in Asia, especially in mainland China, the first country with a major outbreak and stringent lockdown mandates. Therefore, the current study is well enriched by focusing on information demand behavior in the context of COVID-19. Possible measures for improvement were also given to existing and potential problems, taking into account the participants’ views.

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Jason Morris and Victoria Knight

The purpose of this paper is to set out an approach to innovation in criminal justice settings that gives service users a “voice” through the co-production of digital content…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out an approach to innovation in criminal justice settings that gives service users a “voice” through the co-production of digital content designed for services that promote desistance. The authors describe the benefits and challenges of involving service users in co-creating mediated digital content within a co-production framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a new methodology for developing desistance-oriented programmes. The authors draw on a distinctive co-production exemplar within a prison setting that captures the perspectives of people who have shared their voices and the authors begin to explore the impact that co-production has had for them and for the service.

Findings

The testimonies of service users involved in this exemplar provide insights into the benefits and challenges of co-production in the criminal justice system more broadly.

Practical implications

Co-production is a credible service design strategy for developing digital services in prisons and probation; Complementary Digital Media (CDM) provides a promising pedagogical approach to promoting desistance; CDM enables service users to share their voice and stories to assist their peers. Digitally enabled courses to promote desistance can be well suited to peer support delivery models.

Originality/value

CDM is a novel approach that uses co-production to create highly tailored content to promote desistance in discrete target groups. CDM can be used to digitalise processes within traditional offending behaviour programmes (OBPs). It can also enable the development of innovative toolkit approaches for flexible use within day-to-day therapeutic conversations between service users and criminal justice staff or peer supporters. CDM thereby offers practitioners in criminal justice settings an entirely new set of evidence-informed resources to engage service users.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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