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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Ralph Adler, Carolyn Stringer and Max Yap

The valuation and pricing of information assets often presents managers with substantial challenges. Information assets are usually highly unique, lack objective price…

Abstract

Purpose

The valuation and pricing of information assets often presents managers with substantial challenges. Information assets are usually highly unique, lack objective price benchmarks, have a high potential for piracy, can be simultaneously accessed and enjoyed by multiple users and generally feature significant information asymmetry between sellers and buyers. This paper aims to discuss five methods that can be used to value/price information assets.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that draws and builds upon the multidisciplinary pricing literature.

Findings

A tree diagram, one that matches particular combinations of information asset features with each of the five methods, is presented to assist practitioners with their choice of valuation/pricing method.

Originality/value

The pricing of information assets is a challenging and even daunting task. The linkages specified by the paper’s model, and in particular its matching of information asset characteristics with specific valuation/pricing methods, offers a decision tool that does not currently exist. This tool is capable of supporting practitioner decision-making and highlights avenues for future scholarly research.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Ralph Adler, Mansi Mansi, Rakesh Pandey and Carolyn Stringer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the biodiversity reporting practices and trends of the top 50 Australian mining companies before and after the United Nations (UN…

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1228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the biodiversity reporting practices and trends of the top 50 Australian mining companies before and after the United Nations (UN) declared the period 2011-2020 as the “Decade on Biodiversity”.

Design/methodology/approach

Using content analysis and interviews, this study compares the extent and type of biodiversity disclosures made by the Australian Stock Exchange’s top 50 metals and mining companies both before and after the UN’s “Decade on Biodiversity” declaration in 2010.

Findings

A significant increase in the amount of biodiversity reporting is observed between the 2010 fiscal year preceding the UN’s declaration and the 2012 and 2013 fiscal years following the declaration. The findings reveal, however, that the extent of biodiversity reporting is quite variable, with some companies showing substantial increases in their biodiversity reporting and others showing modest or no increases. In particular, the larger companies in the sample showed a statistically significant increase in their disclosures on biodiversity in 2013 compared with 2010, while the increase in biodiversity disclosures by smaller companies was not significant. While interviewees spoke about their companies being more open and transparent, the biodiversity information that is being reported would not enable external parties to assess the company’s biodiversity performance.

Research limitations/implications

To minimise an organisation’s use of biodiversity reporting as an impression management tool, it is suggested that biodiversity reporting should be more impact based and organisations should provide a report of their activities and their direct and tangible impacts on short-term and long-term biodiversity in and around their operating sites. A possible limitation of the present study pertains to its focus on companies’ voluntary disclosures made in their annual reports and sustainability reports, as opposed to other possible formal or even informal disclosure mediums.

Social implications

Australia is one of 17 mega-diverse wildlife countries in the world. Finding ways to support the country’s biodiversity framework and strategy are crucial to this continued status. Due to the mining industry’s significant impact on Australia’s biodiversity, a strong need exists for biodiversity reporting by this industry. Furthermore, this reporting should be provided on a site-by-site basis. At present, the reporting aggregation typically conducted by mining companies produces obscure information that is neither useful for stakeholders who are impacted by the mining companies’ activities nor for policymakers who are vested with responsibility for protecting and sustaining the world’s biodiversity.

Originality/value

This study examines the biodiversity reporting and discourse practices of mining companies in Australia and develops a 50-item biodiversity reporting index to measure the biodiversity reporting practices.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Ralph Adler, Carolyn Stringer and Paul Shantapriyan

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400

Abstract

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Carolyn Stringer

This paper seeks to respond to Otley's calls for future research to take an integrated and longitudinal approach to examining the operation of performance management in…

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4316

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to respond to Otley's calls for future research to take an integrated and longitudinal approach to examining the operation of performance management in real organizations. The paper reviews 120 field studies published in Accounting, Organizations and Society and Management Accounting Research over the past 15 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The Otley's performance management framework is used to classify the field studies in terms of five central issues that relate to objectives, strategies, target setting, reward systems, and information flows.

Findings

The key findings are that only nine field studies examine the integrated performance management framework in any depth, and the research to date is fragmentary with regard to, for example, the performance management issues studied and theories used.

Research limitations/implications

Implications from this research include the need to examine the operation of the integrated performance management framework together with in‐depth research methods to understand the system in use, rather than the intended design of performance management processes. Future theoretical development could also be enhanced by better selection of research sites and building on prior studies. The limitations of this review include journal bias and limitations associated with classifying the diverse range of field studies using any framework, including the Otley's framework.

Originality/value

The novelty of this review lies in using Otley's framework to classify the expansive performance management literature and to document the extent of the integrative nature of the field studies, the depth of the studies, and the diversity of theories applied.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Carolyn Stringer

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231

Abstract

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Kenneth A. Merchant

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the general failure of management accounting research to be useful for practitioners.

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1908

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the general failure of management accounting research to be useful for practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the causes and consequences of the problem, and possible remedies.

Findings

The causes of the problem, and hence also the remedies, are related to choice of topics, research design, and writing and dissemination of findings; researchers are forced into choices that lead to less useful research by the research evaluation standards used by the major accounting journals and university professor evaluation practices.

Originality/value

While this general problem of lack of research usefulness has been discussed at some length in other areas of management, the issue has not received much attention in the management accounting community, other than with a few calls for more field research. However, getting out into the field more to do research addresses only one part of this important failure.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Carolyn Stringer, Jeni Didham and Paul Theivananthampillai

This paper aims to explore the complex relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, pay satisfaction and job satisfaction at the retailer that uses a…

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34816

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the complex relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, pay satisfaction and job satisfaction at the retailer that uses a pay‐for‐performance plan for front‐line employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a single organization case study across seven stores, and uses a survey, archival documents, open‐ended questions and researcher interaction with employees and managers.

Findings

The results provide some support for the complementary nature of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation was positively associated with pay and job satisfactions, whereas extrinsic motivation was negatively associated with job satisfaction, and not associated with pay satisfaction. The qualitative insights indicate that pay fairness is important, and those who perceived pay was not fair generally made comparisons with others or felt that pay did not reflect their effort. It is also found that the majority of employees perceived that goals were clear.

Research limitations/implications

The dominance of extrinsic motivation without including behavioural, social, and psychological factors in agency theory research is questioned. The research finds no support for “crowding out”, but rather finds some evidence of “crowding in” where intrinsic motivation is enhanced, to the detriment of extrinsic motivation.

Practical implications

The findings highlight that managers should enhance both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and pay employees well to increase job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Few studies examine incentives for front‐line employees, and there is evidence that minimum wage employees can have high intrinsic motivation. Perceptions of pay fairness can vary across motivation levels, age, and gender.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Rusdi Akbar, Robyn Pilcher and Brian Perrin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the implementation of performance measurement systems (PMSs) in Indonesian local government (ILG) using Smart PLS. Couched…

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3392

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the implementation of performance measurement systems (PMSs) in Indonesian local government (ILG) using Smart PLS. Couched within an institutional theory framework, it explores a conceptual model developed to explain the hypothesised relationships between technical and organisational factors and the development and use of performance indicators and accountability practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were sent to senior finance officers in all local governments (457) across Indonesia with a response rate of 21.4 percent being achieved. Smart PLS was used to assess the quality of the data and analyse the research model proposed.

Findings

Findings revealed that ILGs developed performance indicators more to fulfil regulatory requirements than to make their organisation more effective and efficient. As a way of increasing the success of PMS implementation management commitment through good leadership was found to be a major contributor. Coercive pressure from central government impacted on the result as did normative isomorphism by way of widespread training by universities (and others) and the subsequent sharing of this knowledge.

Practical implications

The findings will assist Indonesian central government formulate future government policy as well as design appropriate strategies for implementing the second wave of (bureaucratic) reform.

Originality/value

Set in a local government environment in a developing country, this research is original and makes three major contributions. First, it provides an understanding of factors influencing the development and use of performance measures in the ILG context. Second, the use of Smart PLS is original in this context and fills a gap in the literature examining local government PMS. Last, the existence of institutional isomorphism reaffirms that this theory is still applicable in the twenty‐first century and relevant as an explanator of the results in the context examined here.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

David Otley

This article has two main parts. First, the aim of the paper is to give a brief overview of the major developments in management control over the past 50 years and attempt…

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1608

Abstract

Purpose

This article has two main parts. First, the aim of the paper is to give a brief overview of the major developments in management control over the past 50 years and attempt to draw out some abiding themes that have arisen from the work that has been conducted. Second, it will examine one of the more recent issues in more detail, namely managing under conditions of uncertainty, and outline the contribution that management control systems research can make.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper.

Findings

The primary aim is to suggest areas for research that are likely to be both relevant and fruitful in the future. It represents a personal point of view, and is in no sense a comprehensive review of the literature, but rather attempts to draw out some important themes that are worthy of further study and development.

Originality/value

The paper will be of use to those seeking to design research studies in performance management.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

R. Murray Lindsay

The purpose of this paper is to expand on some of the points made in Ken Merchant's paper (this issue) in connection with the research‐practice gap.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand on some of the points made in Ken Merchant's paper (this issue) in connection with the research‐practice gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Aiming to be provocative for the purpose of evoking further discussion, this commentary adopts the perspective that some deeply rooted misconceptions about the nature and production of scientific knowledge underpin the research‐practice gap.

Findings

There are three key findings. First, contrary to popular belief, practical knowledge does not simply derive from basic (“scientific”) knowledge “trickling down” to practice; instead, basic knowledge needs to be transformed into a theory or phronesis of management accounting in a manner that reflects the context and purpose of organizations. Practical knowledge therefore becomes a distinct and rigorous mode of knowing in its own right, no less important than basic knowledge. Second, the adoption of field research or the case study method may be the only way to overcome all of the dimensions associated with the “data problem” existing in management accounting. Finally, a strong argument can be made to suggest that the research‐practice gap and its epistemological underpinnings not only impede the discipline's ability to carve out its own unique intellectual identity (Malmi and Granlund), but they also explain the discipline's inability to produce a cumulative body of knowledge.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that a key step, among others, in addressing the researcher‐practitioner gap is the need to overcome philosophical misconceptions about the nature and production of scientific knowledge. This perspective has not received significant coverage in accounting.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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