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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Srinath Perera, Carolyn S. Hayles and Stephen Kerlin

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of research into the principles and procedures associated with value management (VM) and assess its use and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of research into the principles and procedures associated with value management (VM) and assess its use and effectiveness within the construction industry in Northern Ireland. It provides a brief review of the principles, various procedures and methods associated with VM, investigates the positive and negative factors relating to its use whilst analysing the extent of its usage and determining its effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach, the authors present the results of a survey of construction professionals operating in Northern Ireland and provide an examination of three case studies exploring the use of VM within the Northern Ireland construction industry.

Findings

In an industry where the client's needs and demands are of paramount importance, VM has emerged as a tool which can help satisfy these needs. This study shows that VM is frequently used within the Northern Ireland construction industry and on the whole is quite effective. However, the research exposed a general consensus that the VM process is frequently not implemented at the most appropriate stage of a project, which suggests that if it was, it could perhaps be more effective than it is at present. There is an apparent lack of formal methods used to carry out the VM process. Instead, rather loose and informal methods are used.

Originality/value

In the absence of a similar study that analyses the factors that influence the VM process highlighting and documenting the views and opinions expressed by the professionals within today's industry and reviewing the effectiveness of its usage, this paper documents a snapshot of practice of VM within the Northern Ireland construction industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2010

Carolyn S. Hayles

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key challenges facing non‐governmental organisations (NGOs) during decision making in post disaster housing reconstruction.

2494

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key challenges facing non‐governmental organisations (NGOs) during decision making in post disaster housing reconstruction.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was undertaken to establish the key challenges facing disaster management practitioners. Following this review, practitioners from leading NGOs were asked to discuss their experiences of post disaster housing reconstruction including the issues of hazard risk and appropriate mitigation including increasing vulnerability due to climate change, end‐users and stakeholder consultation in planning and design, technological solutions, and constructing the build; as these were identified in the literature as the principal challenges being faced by practitioners in the pursuit of sustainable construction.

Findings

The research results presented in this paper provide clear insights into the decision‐making practices of these NGOs and establish where improvements need to be made. The results also establish that knowledge management activities need to be more focused to ensure that lessons learnt previously are implemented elsewhere; critical in hazard mitigation and meeting the challenges of increased vulnerability due to climate change.

Research limitations/implications

The paper includes recommendations for improved knowledge transfer and dissemination of “lessons learnt” in order to capture knowledge gained on projects. Future research will build on this through a detailed examination of the project management process applied to recently completed case studies. Key intervention points in the life cycle of projects will be identified and anticipated knowledge requirements for each stage mapped.

Originality/value

Interviews with practitioners reporting first hand on the challenges they face in the field. Useful for those supporting practitioners through research and development as well as donor organisations as it has been revealed that a lot of issues arise as a result of the way projects are funded.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Carolyn S. Hayles, Moira Dean, Sarah A. Lappin and Jane E. McCullough

In this paper, the authors present the Awareness Behaviour Intervention Action (ABIA) framework, a new system developed by them to support environmentally responsible…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors present the Awareness Behaviour Intervention Action (ABIA) framework, a new system developed by them to support environmentally responsible behaviour (ERB).

Design/methodology/approach

Previous ERB programmes have failed to deliver lasting results; they have not appropriately understood and provided systems to address ERB (Costanzo et al., 1986). The ABIA framework has been developed in line with behavioural studies in other disciplines. A preliminary pilot study has been carried out with social housing residents in order to understand the framework's efficacy.

Findings

The ABIA framework enables a better understanding of current attitudes to environmental issues and provides support for ERB alongside technological interventions employed to promote carbon reduction.

Research limitations/implications

The ABIA framework could be tested on individuals and communities in a variety of socio-economic, political and cultural contexts. This will help unpack how it can impact on the behaviours of individuals and communities including stakeholders.

Practical implications

This type of research and the ABIA framework developed from it are crucial if the EU is to reduce is domestic carbon footprint and if the UK is to meet its pledge to become the first country in the world in which all new homes from 2016 are to be zero carbon.

Social implications

The framework encourages both individual and community engagement in solving of sustainability issues.

Originality/value

There are few studies that have developed a framework which can be used in practice to support behavioural change for adaptation to sustainable living in low- or zero-carbon homes.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Paul Chinowsky, Amy Schweikert, Gordon Hughes, Carolyn S. Hayles, Niko Strzepek, Kenneth Strzepek and Michael Westphal

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential impact of climate change on the built environment in four Northern Asian countries. The impact on roads and buildings…

475

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential impact of climate change on the built environment in four Northern Asian countries. The impact on roads and buildings infrastructure in China, Japan, South Korea and Mongolia were considered during the decades 2030, 2050 and 2090.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a stressor-response approach, where using the analysis of 17 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) approved Global Circulation Model (GCM) scenarios, projections for impacts from flooding events, precipitation amounts and temperature were determined. The cost of the impacts, based on both maintenance and new construction considerations, were then determined. “Adapt” and “No Adapt” scenarios were incorporated to predict potential costs in each era.

Findings

Mongolia is vulnerable under the majority of scenarios and faces the greatest opportunity cost in terms of potential loss to enhancing the road stock. China is also vulnerable, but the extent of this vulnerability varies widely based on the climate scenarios. Japan is primarily vulnerable to road stock impacts, although some scenarios indicate buildings vulnerability. South Korea appears to have the least vulnerability but could still face $1 billion annual costs from climate change impacts.

Practical implications

Results indicate the need for proactive policy planning to avoid costly impacts later in the century.

Originality/value

The study illustrates the diverse affects that may occur under climate change scenarios and the potential benefit gained from understanding and planning for the projected climate impacts on the built environment.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Akintola Akintoye and Jim Birnie

366

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Yenny Rahmayati

This study aims to reframe the common concept of post-disaster reconstruction “building back better”, especially in the context of post-disaster housing design.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reframe the common concept of post-disaster reconstruction “building back better”, especially in the context of post-disaster housing design.

Design/methodology/approach

An Aceh post-tsunami housing reconstruction project is used as a case study with qualitative methodology through in-depth interviews of selected respondents.

Findings

The study findings have shown that the term “building back better” is not a familiar term for housing recipients. Whichever different personal background post-disaster survivors come from, whether they are housewife, civil servant, fisherman, university student, businessman or a professional, none have ever heard this phrase. All found it hard to understand the term. This study argues that the “building back better” concept is good in policy but not working in practice. As a result, housing recipients not only were dissatisfied with their new houses but also found that the new housing configurations profoundly altered their traditional way of life. In light of these findings, the paper argues that the concept of “building back better” needs to be reframed to take account of the cultural individual and communal needs and wants of post-disaster survivors.

Research limitations/implications

This study discusses only one aspect of post-disaster reconstruction that is the design of housing reconstruction.

Practical implications

Results from this study provide a practical contribution for reconstruction actors especially designers, architects and planners. It helps them to reconsider the common concepts they have used for post-disaster reconstruction processes particularly in designing housing reconstruction projects.

Originality/value

This study focuses on the question of how tsunami survivors in Aceh reacted to the design of their new post-tsunami houses and what they had done themselves to make their homes a better and nicer place to live within their own cultural needs. This study also sought to understand what motivated the opinions the respondents had about the design of housing reconstruction after the tsunami in Aceh generally. In addition, the study investigated whether survivors knew the phrase and the credo of “building back better” in a post-disaster context.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Carolyn Susan Hayles

This paper aims to explore the outputs of an internship programme, one of a number of campus-based sustainability activities that have been introduced at the University of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the outputs of an internship programme, one of a number of campus-based sustainability activities that have been introduced at the University of Wales, Trinity Saint David, to encourage student-led campus-based greening initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was undertaken, allowing the researcher to investigate the programme in its real-life context. The researcher used multiple sources of evidence to gain as holistic a picture as possible.

Findings

Interns report positive changes in their behaviours towards sustainability, s well as encouraging feedback on their experiential learning, the development of their soft skills and the creation of new knowledge. Moreover, students communicated perceived benefits for their future careers. The reported outcomes reflect mutually beneficial relationships for student and institution, for example, raising the profile of campus greening activities and supporting the University’s aim to embed sustainability throughout its campus, community and culture.

Research limitations/implications

The researcher recognises the limitations of the research, in particular, the small sample size, which has resulted primarily in qualitative results being presented.

Practical implications

Feedback from previous interns will be used to shape future internships. In particular, Institute of Sustainable Practice, Innovation and Resource Effectiveness (INSPIRE) will look for opportunities to work more closely with University operations, departments, faculties and alongside University staff, both academic and support staff.

Social implications

Following student feedback, INSPIRE will give students opportunities for wider involvement, including an opportunity to propose their own projects to shape future internships that meet the needs of student body on campus.

Originality/value

Despite being one case study from one institution, the research highlights the value of such programmes for other institutions.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Anthony J. Hall and Anthony Clayton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of industrial practitioners from Jamaica's hotel, travel and tourism industry on climate change.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of industrial practitioners from Jamaica's hotel, travel and tourism industry on climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses standard questions to explore the likely impact of climate change on tourism and the kinds of action needed by government and by industry to mitigate these impacts.

Findings

It is indicated that practitioners are aware of the growing impact of climate change on their business and the need for a co‐ordinated response.

Originality/value

The paper relates the analysis of climate issues in the Caribbean to the views and experiences of industry leaders.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Richard Teare

485

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Marlene Attzs

The purpose of this paper is to explain the vital economic role of the travel and tourism industry in the Caribbean.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the vital economic role of the travel and tourism industry in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on climate change impacts in small island developing states. Two key challenges to the development of a sustainable tourism industry in the region are discussed: managing tourism development within the socio‐cultural, ecological carrying capacity of the region and anticipating and adapting to the impacts of climate change on the Caribbean.

Findings

Climate change has significant implications for both rainfall and saline intrusion in ground water, which could directly threaten both the tourism industry and other local livelihoods. Water shortages will be particularly critical in the Caribbean islands that are already water‐stressed; at or near the limits of their available supplies.

Originality/value

This paper focuses particularly on the impact of hurricanes on the sustainability of regional tourism and the related socioeconomic consequences. Provides policy recommendations on the way forward to ensure the sustainable development of Caribbean region tourism.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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