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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Carolyn Ramsden, Richard C. Smardon and Gregory Michel

The City of Syracuse, New York, has undertaken energy conservation measures over the past decade. In 2011, the city completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory that serves…

Abstract

Purpose

The City of Syracuse, New York, has undertaken energy conservation measures over the past decade. In 2011, the city completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory that serves as the basis for current sustainability planning processes, and the process to complete this analysis was uniquely collaborative and is offered as a case study. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This inventory was the product of collaboration between the city, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and the Central New York Regional Planning and Development Board, through the Climate Change Innovation Program. Following guidance from International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives's Local Government Operations Protocol and utilizing Clean Air and Climate Protection software, the baseline year for the inventory was 2002, and the municipal analysis covered five sectors: buildings and facilities, vehicle fleet, aviation, water delivery, and streetlights and traffic lights. The city's community analysis assessed residential, commercial and industrial energy use, transportation and waste sectors.

Findings

The City of Syracuse has achieved energy and GHG reductions over the inventory timeframe. While savings have been accomplished, significant challenges to future energy and GHG reductions remain.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include obtaining data quality and consistency for analysis.

Practical implications

This case study could serve as a model for moving forward with GHG inventory analysis and action for small- to medium-sized cities in the NE, USA.

Social implications

This was an experiment in collaboration between an academic institution, NGOs and a municipal entity.

Originality/value

The city's 2010 inventory has been followed by community outreach and stakeholder engagement for the sustainability planning process. The city formed advisory teams composed of community experts in the areas of energy and green building, natural environment, waste and recycling, education and outreach, and food systems. The collaborative approach the city utilized offers a helpful model for other municipalities to follow to overcome resource constraints and complete energy and cost-saving carbon footprinting assessments.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Carolyn Timms, Tracey Fishman, Alexander Godineau, Jamie Granger and Tariro Sibanda

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of undergraduate university students’ course experience (learning community (LC), clear goals and standards…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of undergraduate university students’ course experience (learning community (LC), clear goals and standards, student support, study-family affect (SF affect) and autonomy) to their well-being, as measured by psychological engagement (dedication, absorption and vigour) and burnout (exhaustion and disengagement/cynicism).

Design/methodology/approach

First-year psychology students (n=128) were surveyed using previously validated measures of their well-being and experiences at university.

Findings

Belonging to a LC (where students were encouraged to develop fluidity with the subject matter and share insights) was positively related to students’ psychological engagement. By contrast, the provision of ready access to course materials did not predict student engagement. Knowledge of goals and standards predicted that students would find course work energising (vigour). Respondents reported that SF affect (where participation at university enhances family life) was related to their engagement at university. In addition, mature age students (over the age of 25 years) reported higher levels of engagement in their study than did younger students.

Research limitations/implications

The dominant predictor of student well-being (LC) was redolent of two important psychological human needs (affiliation and mastery). The central nature of this variable to student well-being is therefore currently undifferentiated and calls for the application of more finely tuned instruments to predict student well-being.

Originality/value

The current research applied measures from the widely validated Course Experience Questionnaire (Ramsden, 1991) as predictors of students’ psychological engagement and burnout. It highlights the value of personal relationships and community in university students’ mastery of difficult course material.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Robyn Ramsden, Richard Colbran, Tricia Linehan, Michael Edwards, Hilal Varinli, Carolyn Ripper, Angela Kerr, Andrew Harvey, Phil Naden, Scott McLachlan and Stephen Rodwell

While one-third of Australians live outside major cities, there are ongoing challenges in providing accessible, sustainable, and appropriate primary health care services…

Abstract

Purpose

While one-third of Australians live outside major cities, there are ongoing challenges in providing accessible, sustainable, and appropriate primary health care services in rural and remote communities. The purpose of this paper is to explore a partnership approach to understanding and addressing complex primary health workforce issues in the western region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe how a collaboration of five organisations worked together to engage a broader group of stakeholders and secure commitment and resources for a regional approach to address workforce challenges in Western NSW. A literature review and formal interviews with stakeholders gathered knowledge, identified issues and informed the overarching approach, including the development of the Western NSW Partnership Model and Primary Health Workforce Planning Framework. A stakeholder forum tested the proposed approach and gained endorsement for a collaborative priority action plan.

Findings

The Western NSW Partnership Model successfully engaged regional stakeholders and guided the development of a collaborative approach to building a sustainable primary health workforce for the future.

Originality/value

Given the scarcity of literature about effective partnerships approaches to address rural health workforce challenges, this paper contributes to an understanding of how to build sustainable partnerships to positively impact on the rural health workforce. This approach is replicable and potentially valuable elsewhere in NSW, other parts of Australia and internationally.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Robert Czernkowski, Rosin a Mladenovic, Carolyn Cousins, Roger Gibson and Gordon Howitt

In this paper, we measure the impact of transactional leadership and transformational leadership styles on student learning outcomes. Leadership style was measured using a…

Abstract

In this paper, we measure the impact of transactional leadership and transformational leadership styles on student learning outcomes. Leadership style was measured using a set of questions that were developed based on the conceptions of leadership style from Avolio, Waldman and Yammarino (1991). Student learning outcomes investigated included overall final mark achieved in the course, as well as communication skills, writing skills, critical thinking and analysis skills, study skills, reading skills and interpersonal skills.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Carolyn Rowlinson

Following an overview of on‐demand and electronic reserve (OD/ER) services, the article describes related developments in the UK through the Electronic Libraries Programme…

Abstract

Following an overview of on‐demand and electronic reserve (OD/ER) services, the article describes related developments in the UK through the Electronic Libraries Programme (eLib), and advances in copyright clearance. The HERON project (Higher Education Resources ON‐demand) is continuing the momentum of the original projects in the OD/ER strand. It is developing a one‐stop shop for copyright clearance and digitisation, and creating a resource bank of electronic texts which will eventually be available to all Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the UK to support teaching and learning.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Julie Davies and Howard Thomas

During the last 40 years, the growth and impact of UK business schools have been significant. Relatively few studies have reviewed how business school deans emerge and…

Abstract

Purpose

During the last 40 years, the growth and impact of UK business schools have been significant. Relatively few studies have reviewed how business school deans emerge and grow. This paper aims to explore the experiences and psychometric profiles of UK business school leaders to understand their tenures, problems, dilemmas and succession issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised 16 semi‐structured interviews with business school deans and Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) questionnaires completed by deans and aspiring deans (associate deans and heads of department). The study uses the executive life cycle and concepts of social capital as theoretical frameworks to understand the dean's role.

Findings

The study revealed a pattern of individuals working in their first deanship at their third business school. Their career trajectories highlighted the usefulness of consultancy skills similar to those of a partner in a professional service firm. The importance of the dean's role in terms of business school fit, creating a differentiation strategy and team building were emphasised. The psychometric preferences of the deans in the sample indicated Jungian extroversion, tough mindedness, seeing patterns and making connections, strategic thinking and a tendency to bring issues to closure. Recommendations are made for the development of a more heterogeneous, transnational cadre of business school deans and improved dialogue with heads of universities to understand the positive contribution of business school leaders as changing business models are needed in turbulent times.

Originality/value

There are few explanations of the roles and functioning of business school deans in practice. The insights gained are valuable for business school deans and are, more broadly, of interest to heads of universities and executive search firms. The paper is theoretically and practically relevant to building leadership capabilities in knowledge intensive organisations and professional service firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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