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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Carolyn Blackburn

A case study is reported of a relationship-based early intervention (EI) service for children with complex needs in New Zealand. The purpose of this paper is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

A case study is reported of a relationship-based early intervention (EI) service for children with complex needs in New Zealand. The purpose of this paper is to explore parent and professional views and perceptions about the key characteristics of a relationship-based EI service.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study involved interviews and observations with 39 participants (10 children, 11 parents and 18 professionals).

Findings

Parents appreciated the knowledgeable, well-trained professionals who invested time in getting to know (and love) children and families and family practices, worked together in harmony and valued the contribution that parents made to their child’s progress and achievement. Professionals described the key characteristics of the service in terms of the range of therapies offered by the service, the focus on a strengths-based and family-focussed approach, play-based assessments, acceptance and value of family practices (including responsiveness to Maori and bi-culturalism), appropriate and respectful places to meet and greet families and work with children, and recruitment and retention of humble professionals who identified with the ethos of the model. Observable social processes and structures within the delivery of the model include respectful professional interactions and relationships with children and families, integrated professional working, effective and timely communication between professionals and families, pedagogy of listening, waiting and personalisation, engaged families and actively participating children.

Originality/value

This case study emphasises the significance of professional love and relational pedagogy to EI services and the value of this to improving parent-child relationships and children’s long-term outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Silvia Ines Monserrat and Claire A. Simmers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the legacies of Carolyn R. Dexter through the lens of a broader perspective on faculty work productivity and impact.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the legacies of Carolyn R. Dexter through the lens of a broader perspective on faculty work productivity and impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used critical biography, a qualitative methodology, to explore and explain the development and contributions of Carolyn R. Dexter.

Findings

Carolyn R. Dexter was both a product and an anomaly of her times. By contemporary academic standards Dexter’s publication productivity was limited, yet her influence was strong on many individuals and organizations. She promoted internationalization of professional organizations and supported gender equality.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of authors’ interpretation is recognized.

Practical implications

Dexter’s career is an example of faculty work productivity and impact which is broader than publication productivity. This work illustrates the appropriateness of qualitative research, specifically, critical biography, in placing important management figures in context.

Originality/value

Studies focusing on women leadership at The Academy of Management, the preeminent professional association for management and organization scholars, are limited. Carolyn R. Dexter’s leadership provides a roadmap illustrating practical contributions of faculty productivity and impact beyond publications. Throughout her academic life Carolyn Dexter made her faculty work “meaningful” to the organizations in which she worked and to the people she encountered.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Nancy L. Leech and Carolyn A. Haug

This paper aims to compare the psychometric properties of the Research Motivation Scale (RMS) from faculty in schools of education in American research universities to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the psychometric properties of the Research Motivation Scale (RMS) from faculty in schools of education in American research universities to previous findings on this scale when administered to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was an exploratory, quantitative study using survey research methods, and utilizing confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses and statistical tests of population differences.

Findings

Results indicate an adequate fit to a previously found three-factor structure. However, a new four-factor model, accounting for 47 per cent of the variance, was identified as a better fit: failure avoidance, intrinsic reward – satisfaction, intrinsic reward – joy and extrinsic reward. The overall reliability for the entire measure was 0.76. Intrinsic motivation and failure avoidance were rated statistically more important by education faculty than STEM faculty.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory study and because of the chosen research approach, generalizations may be limited and further research in this area is recommended.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the literature on RMS with data from education faculty. Results support conceptual frameworks regarding faculty outcomes and professional growth, and suggest ways faculty may be encouraged to increase research productivity.

Social implications

This paper includes implications for societal support for research institutions by modeling factors that affect faculty motivations to produce research and thereby increase institutional productivity.

Originality/value

This study builds on conceptual frameworks, explores the use of the RMS with education faculty and compares faculty motivation to conduct research across disciplines.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Nancy L. Leech, Jessica Schnittka and Carolyn A. Haug

The purpose of this paper is to investigate motivation to teach for higher education faculty within schools of education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate motivation to teach for higher education faculty within schools of education.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized survey research methods to collect data from higher education faculty at nine universities identified from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of teaching website.

Findings

The predictor variables of gender, years of teaching in higher education, percent of overall workload devoted to teaching and two dummy variables for type of institution (i.e. doctoral granting and research II institution) when considered together did not statistically significantly predict whether or not a faculty person achieved tenure with outstanding teaching. In total, 14 of the factors influencing teaching (FIT)-choice scale components statistically significantly predicted whether or not a faculty person achieved tenure with outstanding teaching, only social dissuasion statistically significantly added to the model.

Originality/value

This is the first study to use the FIT-choice scale with university education faculty, and the findings suggest that higher education faculty may be motivated to produce high-quality instruction based on different factors than K-12 teachers.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Carolyn Maniukiewicz, Sarah Williams and William Keogh

The delivery of assistance to SMEs, provided by enterprise councils at the local level, can vary between those bodies which are innovative and those which are pedestrian…

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Abstract

The delivery of assistance to SMEs, provided by enterprise councils at the local level, can vary between those bodies which are innovative and those which are pedestrian in their approach. Although it is generally accepted that most small firms in the UK sell to local markets, SMEs based within the Aberdeen area of Scotland play an important role in exporting and employment. The potential for birth and growth of firms exists in a number of targeted key sectors which aid the economic development of the Aberdeen area. However, assistance is required to bring people together in order to encourage networking, and this paper seeks to explore the process of facilitating an enterprise culture by examining the collaboration and partnership roles played by a LEC and a university in initiatives which foster enterprise. The relationship of the researchers and practitioners is similar to the model outlined by Oakey and Mukhtar where research and practice are used to inform each other, over time, to identify policy needs. The initiatives examined in this paper are the Entrepreneurs’ Club where established entrepreneurs mix with others at the new venture stage, and the Chrysalis Elite programme which links graduates with existing owner managers, creating a work‐based project involving groups of students. These links extend to the wider business community and organisations, including local entrepreneurs (who provide prizes and guidance), 3i and the Local Investors Network Company (LINC), who offer advice and opportunities. The main outcomes for policy in this paper are that collaboration between a LEC and a university can be very effective in assisting individuals or groups to meet the challenge of building entrepreneurial networks and that effective support can be provided for students to gain experience from the business community.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Thushari Wanniarachchi, Kanchana Dissanayake and Carolyn Downs

The purpose of this study is to assess sustainability across the handloom industry in Sri Lanka and identify opportunities for sustainable innovations supporting new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess sustainability across the handloom industry in Sri Lanka and identify opportunities for sustainable innovations supporting new markets, development of small-and-medium enterprises (SMEs) and growth in the Sri Lankan craft sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multiple case studies methodology, 10 case studies and 37 semi-structured interviews were analysed along with the triple-layered business model canvas.

Findings

The study reveals the handloom industry to be fundamentally sustainable but with structural barriers that hinder both innovation and growth. The environmentally conscious production process and social inclusion within weaving communities are the key driving forces of sustainability in the sector; however, the structure of the industry and lack of access to markets and information act as barriers to both innovation and growth. The incorporation of design interventions, closed-loop manufacturing strategies and the encouragement of community-based entrepreneurship would support sustainability-orientated business innovation in the handloom industry.

Originality/value

The rapidly increasing market share for high-quality, hand-made goods indicates the potential of the creative industries to accelerate socio-economic growth. Handloom textiles is attracting growing interest in fashion markets because of increasing concern about exploitation in production, thus encouraging interest in the economic benefits of fairly traded, high quality materials and the potential contribution of handloom to sustainability in the fashion industry. The results of this study will support the handloom industry and policy-makers in developing support for sustainable innovation in the handloom industry.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Hannelore B. Rader

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to the library and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications…

Abstract

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to the library and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications from 1979. A few items from 1978 were included because information about them had not been available in time for the 1978 listing. Some entries were not annotated because the compiler was unable to secure a copy of the item. The bibliography includes publications on user instruction in all types of libraries and for all types of users from children to adults. To facilitate the use of the list, it has been divided into categories by type of library. Even though the library literature includes many citations to items on user instruction in foreign countries, this bibliography includes only publications in the English language.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

A new post, that of Export Manager, has been created at PMD Chemicals Ltd, Coventry.

Abstract

A new post, that of Export Manager, has been created at PMD Chemicals Ltd, Coventry.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new…

Abstract

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new constitution, it is the first in which all the sections will be actively engaged. From a membership of eight hundred in 1927 we are, in 1930, within measurable distance of a membership of three thousand; and, although we have not reached that figure by a few hundreds—and those few will be the most difficult to obtain quickly—this is a really memorable achievement. There are certain necessary results of the Association's expansion. In the former days it was possible for every member, if he desired, to attend all the meetings; today parallel meetings are necessary in order to represent all interests, and members must make a selection amongst the good things offered. Large meetings are not entirely desirable; discussion of any effective sort is impossible in them; and the speakers are usually those who always speak, and who possess more nerve than the rest of us. This does not mean that they are not worth a hearing. Nevertheless, seeing that at least 1,000 will be at Cambridge, small sectional meetings in which no one who has anything to say need be afraid of saying it, are an ideal to which we are forced by the growth of our numbers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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