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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Caroline Westwood, Peter Schofield and Graham Berridge

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory concerning visitor motivations, consumer experience and behavioural intentions at rural events; more specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory concerning visitor motivations, consumer experience and behavioural intentions at rural events; more specifically, it focusses on agricultural shows, which have hitherto been neglected in the events management literature. These events have successfully broadened their visitor base, but not without the attendant challenges for agricultural events’ designers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a quantitative design using a questionnaire survey. The analysis, using a range of statistical procedures, centres on consumer motivation, experience and behaviour in relation to show features and their influence on future behaviour.

Findings

The findings of this paper demonstrates the relative importance to the consumer of the show’s various components and their influence on revisitation, which reflect the significance of social, cultural and personal meanings attached to their experiences. This highlights key motivational variables such as appreciating the shows’ traditions and intellectual enrichment.

Research limitations/implications

The study takes a cross-sectional approach, using a non-probability sample at four multi-day royal shows. Future research should establish the external validity of the findings and their applicability to smaller one-day agricultural shows.

Practical implications

The research provides a managerial contribution by informing show designers about the motivations of an increasingly diverse range of visitors. This will facilitate decisions around the engagement of contemporary design while preserving the traditional elements of agricultural shows.

Originality/value

Few studies have looked at rural events and, in particular, agricultural shows. Moreover, previous research in this area has focussed on rural tourism and place making, while consumer behaviour and experience at rural events has been neglected. This paper provides an insight into the consumer experience and perceived importance of various aspects of contemporary agricultural shows.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Daina S. Lieberman and Jennifer K. Clayton

The purpose of this paper is to investigate power and its influence on the teaching assignment process and school-based decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate power and its influence on the teaching assignment process and school-based decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interpretive design and thematic analysis were used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with teachers and administrators.

Findings

Both teachers and administrators discussed power and social capital as components of the teaching assignment process. Teachers viewed the origins of their social capital differently than administrators and felt social capital was evident in school-based decision making and the teaching assignment process.

Research limitations/implications

Participants were demographically rather homogeneous. Further studies with a diverse sample could examine race and gender as factors in the teaching assignment process.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates a need for administrators to examine how they consider social capital when distributing teaching assignments and involving teachers in school-based decision making. Administrators’ actions may result in teacher tracking, disadvantaging marginalized and at-risk student populations.

Social implications

There is a clear disconnect between administrator and teacher understanding of the purpose and practice of teaching assignment distribution. Administrators were unaware of their own power, how they wielded it, and the effect it had on teachers.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined teacher–administrator power relations or the teaching assignment process at the secondary level. This study connects the teaching assignment process to social capital and power.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Abstract

Details

Reputation Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-607-1

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Sarah A. Buchanan, Caroline Stratton, Yalin Sun and Ankita Chaudhary

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from research conducted to study the everyday work of information professionals, specifically records managers. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from research conducted to study the everyday work of information professionals, specifically records managers. This paper is a part of the “Research on the Work of 21st Century Information Professionals” study.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers used the tailored design approach to create and increase response rate of our survey. Survey research methodology facilitated the development, pilot and launch of a survey instrument with a 20-question module specific to records management work.

Findings

The authors discovered the frequency of 11 tasks in records managers’ daily work, as well as how important each of 11 competencies are to their success on the job. Professional development topics and format, job satisfaction, strategies for gaining compliance, desired skills for new hires and curricular recommendations are also presented.

Research limitations/implications

The survey generated 334 responses from records management professionals. This sample was based on graduate alumni, targeted professional groups and snowball strategy. Implications from this study include educating doctoral students to study information work and identifying particular areas for strengthening graduate curricula and professional training.

Practical implications

The authors obtained direct insight on what records managers do in their daily work that will inform curricular decision-making.

Originality/value

The study explores an interest in daily work activities through multiple quantifiable data measures to offer nuanced insight on the relationships between different aspects of records management work.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Sarah Westwood

This article represents a reflection on issues which have arisen in the course of a year of change in archives and records management (ARM) training and education at the…

Abstract

This article represents a reflection on issues which have arisen in the course of a year of change in archives and records management (ARM) training and education at the University of Liverpool, and reports on initiatives for new records management courses and methods of delivery planned for the near future.1 Any evaluation of vocational education and training must begin with an examination of the nature of the profession itself, which dictates the larger part of the content of such a programme. It therefore begins with a reflection on current developments in records management theory and practice in the UK, before describing how the University has sought to accommodate them. Outside the UK, in Australia and North America in particular, debate about the nature of records management training has been vigorous,2 but in the UK public debate has been rare. In an attempt to stimulate debate this paper therefore also aims to contribute to the establishment of a records management education agenda which educators and the ARM profession at large may fruitfully address together.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Peter Townsend and Caroline Wan

This research sets out to assess the relevance and impact of interpersonal contact, in the form of multicultural experience, in the development of socio‐cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This research sets out to assess the relevance and impact of interpersonal contact, in the form of multicultural experience, in the development of socio‐cultural adaptation for international students studying in their new country. The original contribution of this research is the application of a statistical methodology to this subject area in the Asia Pacific Basin.

Design/methodology/approach

The data analysis consisted of quantitative, longitudinal and cross‐sectional studies, from a sample consisting of students studying an international business degree, in the categories of living in national home culture or out of national home culture. Longitudinally, 88 students were sampled at the beginning of the semester and four months later. The cross‐sectional study of 380 students, over three years, was for students in these same categories, on the Australian and Malaysian campuses.

Findings

The analysis identified that socio‐cultural adaptation statistically demonstrates an initial negative relationship with multicultural experience, but develops beyond this period with a positive increase and relationship at the end of three years. There were no significant differences for socio‐cultural adaptation and multicultural experience between students studying in or out of their national home culture.

Research limitations/implications

The results statistically demonstrated a continuous increase of multicultural experience but also a U curve shape of socio‐cultural adaptation, thereby confirming previous qualitative research on the culture shock phenomena.

Originality/value

This is the only statistical research to date on the U curve phenomena in the Asia Pacific Basin.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Tony Langham

Abstract

Details

Reputation Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-607-1

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Sharon Mavin, Patricia Bryans and Rosie Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to highlight gendered media constructions which discourage women's acceptability as political leaders and trivialise or ignore their contribution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight gendered media constructions which discourage women's acceptability as political leaders and trivialise or ignore their contribution.

Design/methodology/approach

Media analysis of UK newspapers, government web sites, worldwide web relating to the UK 2010 government election, women MPs and in particular representations of Harriet Harman and Theresa May.

Findings

Media constructions of UK women political leaders are gendered and powerful in messaging women's (un)acceptability as leaders against embedded stereotypes. Being invisible via tokenism and yet spotlighted on the basis of their gender, media constructions trivialize their contribution, thus detracting from their credibility as leaders.

Research limitations/implications

UK‐based study grounded in opportune “snapshot” media analysis during election and resultant formation of UK coalition Government. Focus on two women political leaders, results may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

Raises awareness of the numerical minority status of UK women political leaders, the invisibility‐visibility contradiction and the power of the media to construct women leaders against gender stereotypes. Call for continued challenge to gendered leader stereotypes and women's representation in UK political leadership.

Originality/value

Highlights power of media to perpetuate gender stereotypes of UK women political leaders.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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