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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Michael Clarke, Caroline Newton, Jasmine Cherguit, Chris Donlan and Jannet A. Wright

The aim of this study is to explore short‐term outcomes of communication aid provision from the perspective of children with complex communication needs.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore short‐term outcomes of communication aid provision from the perspective of children with complex communication needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of ten children were interviewed at two time points. The first interviews took place before or within two weeks of the arrival of a new communication aid. A second follow‐up interview was carried out between six and ten weeks later. Initial interviews explored children's views concerning their ability to engage in school activities that they deemed important but difficult to achieve. First interviews also examined children's self‐perceptions related to their self‐efficacy and self‐esteem, and perceptions of others' attitudes towards themselves. Children's views concerning the likely impact of the new communication aid on taking part in activities and their self‐concepts were also explored. The follow‐up interviews asked children to reflect on the short‐term impact of the new communication aid.

Findings

Children reported expected and unexpected positive changes at follow‐up. Notably, unanticipated and undesirable changes were also reported.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the critical issue of early outcomes following communication aid provision from the viewpoint of children themselves.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

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103

Abstract

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Bruna Caroline Campos, Felicio Bruzzi Barros and Samuel Silva Penna

The aim of this paper is to present a novel data transfer technique to simulate, by G/XFEM, a cohesive crack propagation coupled with a smeared damage model. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a novel data transfer technique to simulate, by G/XFEM, a cohesive crack propagation coupled with a smeared damage model. The efficiency of this technique is evaluated in terms of processing time, number of Newton–Raphson iterations and accuracy of structural response.

Design/methodology/approach

The cohesive crack is represented by the G/XFEM enrichment strategy. The elements crossed by the crack are divided into triangular cells. The smeared crack model is used to describe the material behavior. In the nonlinear solution of the problem, state variables associated with the original numerical integration points need to be transferred to new points created with the triangular subdivision. A nonlocal strategy is tailored to transfer the scalar and tensor variables of the constitutive model. The performance of this technique is numerically evaluated.

Findings

When compared with standard Gauss quadrature integration scheme, the proposed strategy may deliver a slightly superior computational efficiency in terms of processing time. The weighting function parameter used in the nonlocal transfer strategy plays an important role. The equilibrium state in the interactive-incremental solution process is not severely penalized and is readily recovered. The advantages of such proposed technique tend to be even more pronounced in more complex and finer meshes.

Originality/value

This work presents a novel data transfer technique based on the ideas of the nonlocal formulation of the state variables and specially tailored to the simulation of cohesive crack propagation in materials governed by the smeared crack constitutive model.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ray Travers and Sue Reeves

The Primrose Project has been developed, as part of the Dangerous People with Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) programme in England and Wales, to specifically address…

Abstract

The Primrose Project has been developed, as part of the Dangerous People with Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) programme in England and Wales, to specifically address the complex needs of women prisoners who pose a significant danger to the public. It has been recognised that the needs of these women prisoners may differ from those of men in the DSPD programme. The Primrose project therefore aims to deliver more effective prison‐based healthcare interventions to these dangerous women prisoners to reduce risk to self and others. The Primrose Project expects to initially support up to 12 women prisoners in HMP Low Newton, Durham. These women prisoners will be placed with other ‘non‐DSPD’ women prisoners in the prison and will receive a variety of therapeutic interventions. Overall, the Primrose Project aims to develop into a comprehensive assessment, treatment and management facility and the proposed evaluation aims to facilitate this development. The evaluation will look at the project as a whole, identifying strengths and limitations to overall improve the service for these women prisoners, who have not previously been provided for. The research is based on a list of comprehensive questions, which form the basis of evaluation of the existing four male DSPD sites in England and Wales, which will prove useful when comparisons are later made with the Primrose Project.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Caroline Williams-Pierce and Theodore F. Swartz

This purpose of this paper is to introduce innovative ways to design, develop and implement original learning experiences, by defining certain design elements with…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to introduce innovative ways to design, develop and implement original learning experiences, by defining certain design elements with illustrative vignettes from the classrooms of teacher pioneers.

Design/methodology/approach

A new rubric of design elements is presented that synthesizes and illustrates theoretical and empirical research.

Findings

Teacher pioneers implement instructional design elements in a manner that supports the subordination of teaching to learning in their classrooms.

Practical implications

The rubric organizes criteria to design, implement, analyze and evaluate the extent to which instructional resources and approaches, at all levels and in all content areas, are likely to foster learners’ independence, autonomy and responsibility.

Originality/value

This paper provides a useful, concise and clearly explained rubric of design elements that, when most effectively implemented, can prepare students to meet, with enthusiasm and confidence, whatever comes their way.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Caroline Gilbert, Sophie De Winne and Luc Sels

Based on role theory, this paper seeks to investigate the impact of HR devolution characteristics (number of devolved HR tasks), characteristics of the HR devolution…

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5153

Abstract

Purpose

Based on role theory, this paper seeks to investigate the impact of HR devolution characteristics (number of devolved HR tasks), characteristics of the HR devolution context (level of support from the HR department, and presence of institutionalised incentives to perform the allotted HR tasks well), and personal characteristics of the front‐line managers (HR competency) on front‐line managers' perceptions of two HR role stressors, i.e. HR role ambiguity and HR role overload.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a sample of 169 front‐line managers from 47 organisations. The results are based on two moderation regression analyses, taking into account the nested nature of the observations.

Findings

The results suggest that the execution of a high number of HR tasks does not lead to the occurrence of HR role stressors among front‐line managers. However, for the HR department it is important to create an appropriate environment in terms of giving HR support and advice to line managers, and training line managers regarding their HR competencies.

Research limitations/implications

This research opens up interesting lines of inquiry regarding the conditions under which the partnership between the HR department and line management can be successful.

Practical implications

The paper provides HR practitioners with insights into the conditions needed to avoid perceptions of HR role stressors among front‐line managers.

Originality/value

The paper applies role theory in a new context, i.e. the HR role of front‐line managers.

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Caroline Emberson, Silvia Maria Pinheiro and Alexander Trautrims

The purpose of this paper is to examine how first-tier suppliers in multi-tier supply chains adapt their vertical and horizontal relationships to reduce the risk of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how first-tier suppliers in multi-tier supply chains adapt their vertical and horizontal relationships to reduce the risk of slavery-like practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Archer’s morphogenetic theory as an analytical lens, this paper presents case analyses adduced from primary and secondary data related to the development of relational anti-slavery supply capabilities in Brazilian–UK beef and timber supply chains.

Findings

Four distinct types of adaptation were found among first-tier suppliers: horizontal systemisation, vertical systemisation, horizontal transformation and vertical differentiation.

Research limitations/implications

This study draws attention to the socially situated nature of corporate action, moving beyond the rationalistic discourse that underpins existing research studies of multi-tier, socially sustainable, supply chain management. Cross-sector comparison highlights sub-country and intra-sectoral differences in both institutional setting and the approaches and outcomes of individual corporate actors’ initiatives. Sustainable supply chain management theorists would do well to seek out those institutional entrepreneurs who actively reshape the institutional conditions within which they find themselves situated.

Practical implications

Practitioners may benefit from adopting a structured approach to the analysis of the necessary or contingent complementarities between their, primarily economic, objectives and the social sustainability goals of other, potential, organizational partners.

Social implications

A range of interventions that may serve to reduce the risk of slavery-like practices in global commodity chains are presented.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel analysis of qualitative empirical data and extends understanding of the agential role played by first-tier suppliers in global, multi-tier, commodity, supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Ann Heylighen, Caroline Van Doren and Peter-Willem Vermeersch

The relationship between the built environment and the human body is rarely considered explicitly in contemporary architecture. In case architects do take the body into…

Abstract

The relationship between the built environment and the human body is rarely considered explicitly in contemporary architecture. In case architects do take the body into account, they tend to derive mathematical proportions or functional dimensions from it, without explicit attention for the bodily experience of a building. In this article, we analyse the built environment in a way less common in architecture, by attending to how a particular person experiences it. Instead of relating the human body to architecture in a mathematical way, we establish a new relationship between architecture and the body—or a body—by demonstrating that our bodies are more involved in the experience of the built environment than we presume. The article focuses on persons with a sensory or physical impairment as they are able to detect building qualities architects may not be attuned to. By accompanying them during a visit to a museum building, we examine how their experiences relate to the architect's intentions. In attending to the bodily experiences of these disabled persons, we provide evidence that architecture is not only seen, but experienced by all senses, and that aesthetics may acquire a broader meaning. Senses can be disconnected or reinforced by nature. Sensory experiences can be consciously or unconsciously eliminated or emphasized by the museum design and use. Architects can have specific intentions in mind, but users (with an impairment) may not experience them. Attending to the experiences of disabled persons, and combining these with the architect's objectives, provides an interesting view of a building. Our analysis does not intend to criticize the one using the other; rather the combination of both views, each present in the building, makes for a richer understanding of what architecture is.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Abstract

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Stephen Henderson and James Musgrave

To translate theory into a practical tool, the purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the development of social marketing strategies to modify…

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4480

Abstract

Purpose

To translate theory into a practical tool, the purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the development of social marketing strategies to modify event attendee behaviour in a sustainable direction.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumer value is synthesised with social marketing and consumer behaviour theory to develop the framework. A major problem for festivals (throwaway tents) and current pro-environmental practices are used to determine the framework's applicability.

Findings

The conceptual framework suggests that achieving desired behaviour(s) within an audience requires consideration of the added value at the downstream level, strategies that recognise offsite/onsite behaviour settings, engagement of upstream advocacy and more attention to the evaluation of success.

Research limitations/implications

A single low-involvement behaviour example is used to validate the conceptual framework suggesting further work is needed to widen tests of its applicability.

Originality/value

This paper synthesises theory into a framework that has significant potential as a tool to develop behavioural change strategies at events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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