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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Michelle M. Hammond, Caroline Murphy and Caitlin A. Demsky

The current study aims to examine stress mindset as a moderator of the relationship between the work–family interface – work–family conflict (WFC) and enrichment (WFE) …

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to examine stress mindset as a moderator of the relationship between the work–family interface – work–family conflict (WFC) and enrichment (WFE) – and two work outcomes: job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine these relationships, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Ireland (N = 314). Bootstrapping in SPSS was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

In addition to direct relationships between WFC/WFE and job satisfaction and turnover intentions, analyses showed that stress mindset is a moderator of the relationships between WFC and job satisfaction and turnover intentions, as well as of the relationship between WFE and job satisfaction, but not WFE and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Providing general support of the propositions of the conservation of resources theory, stress mindset was found to act as a personal resource affecting the relationships between WFC/WFE and most outcomes. The study findings indicate a need to further examine stress mindset in relation to employees' work and family interface.

Practical implications

In line with other research, this study recommends organizational efforts to reduce WFC and increase WFE. Further, as stress mindsets can be altered, practitioners may consider implementing stress mindset training to encourage employees' view of stress as enhancing rather than debilitating to reduce the negative impact of stress on employees in the workplace.

Social implications

Beliefs about the enhancing aspects of stress may allow employees to more effectively navigate transitions between work and family domains and maximize beneficial aspects of participating in both work and family roles.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to investigate the role of stress mindset as a moderator of the associations between the work–family interface and employee work-related outcomes. The findings are relevant to work–family researchers, managers and human resource professionals.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Caroline Murphy and Thomas Turner

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on…

Abstract

Purpose

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on childcare, there is a growing need, particularly in countries with ageing populations, to examine how long-term care (LTC) work is valued. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the way in which employment policies (female labour market participation, retirement age, and precarious work) and social policies (care entitlements and benefits/leave for carers) affect both informal carers and formal care workers in a liberal welfare state with a rapidly ageing population.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing the adult worker model the authors use the existing literature on ageing care and employment to examine the approach of a liberal welfare state to care work focusing on both supports for informal carers and job quality in the formal care sector.

Findings

The research suggests that employment policies advocating increased labour participation, delaying retirement and treating informal care as a form of welfare are at odds with LTC strategies which encourage informal care. Furthermore, the latter policy acts to devalue formal care roles in an economic sense and potentially discourages workers from entering the formal care sector.

Originality/value

To date research investigating the interplay between employment and LTC policies has focused on either informal or formal care workers. In combining both aspects, we view informal and formal care workers as complementary, interdependent agents in the care process. This underlines the need to develop social policy regarding care and employment which encompasses the needs of each group concurrently.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Christine Cross, Margaret Linehan and Caroline Murphy

Much of the literature identifies the positive nature of role models in career progression. The purpose of this paper is to take the contrary perspective and explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Much of the literature identifies the positive nature of role models in career progression. The purpose of this paper is to take the contrary perspective and explore whether role-modelling behaviour of senior female managers can be unintentionally interpreted as negative, with an associated negative impact on career progression decisions of female managers.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this issue the authors took a grounded theory approach and 30 in-depth interviews were conducted with female middle-level managers in a wide range of Irish organisations.

Findings

The results of the interviews illustrate that role-modelling behaviour has the potential to negatively, rather than positively affect female career progression choices.

Practical implications

The unintended consequences of role-modelling behaviour of senior female managers highlights both the concept of negative role-modelling behaviour and identifies its impact on female managerial career progression.

Originality/value

This paper offers new insights into the construction of the global role model by introducing two new elements – the realistic role model and the departed role model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Steven McCartney, Caroline Murphy and Jean Mccarthy

Drawing on human capital theory and the human capital resources framework, this study explores the knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on human capital theory and the human capital resources framework, this study explores the knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required by the emerging role of human resource (HR) analysts. This study aims to systematically identify the key KSAOs and develop a competency model for HR Analysts amid the growing digitalization of work.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting best practices for competency modeling set out by Campion et al. (2011), this study first analyzes 110 HR analyst job advertisements collected from five countries: Australia, Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA. Second a thematic analysis of 12 in-depth semistructured interviews with HR analytics professionals from Canada and Ireland is then conducted to develop a novel competency model for HR Analysts.

Findings

This study adds to the developing and fast-growing field of HR analytics literature by offering evidence supporting a set of six distinct competencies required by HR Analysts including: consulting, technical knowledge, data fluency and data analysis, HR and business acumen, research and discovery and storytelling and communication.

Practical implications

The research findings have several practical implications, specifically in recruitment and selection, HR development and HR system alignment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the evolving HR analytics literature in two ways. First, the study links the role of HR Analysts to human capital theory and the human capital resource framework. Second, it offers a timely and empirically driven competency model for the emerging role of HR Analysts.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Ebony M. Duncan-Shippy, Sarah Caroline Murphy and Michelle A. Purdy

This chapter examines the framing of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) Movement in mainstream media. An analytic sample of 4,303 articles collected from the Dow Jones Factiva…

Abstract

This chapter examines the framing of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) Movement in mainstream media. An analytic sample of 4,303 articles collected from the Dow Jones Factiva database reveals variation in depth, breadth, and intensity of BLM coverage in the following newspapers between 2012 and 2016: The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Al Jazeera English. We review contemporary literature on racial inequality and employ Media Framing and Critical Race Theory to discuss the implications of our findings on public perceptions, future policy formation, and contemporary social protest worldwide.

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Abstract

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Peter Murphy, Katarzyna Lakoma, Peter Eckersley and Russ Glennon

This chapter investigates the history, antecedents and drivers for the latest Fire and Rescue National Framework for England, published in 2018. It reviews the previous…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the history, antecedents and drivers for the latest Fire and Rescue National Framework for England, published in 2018. It reviews the previous five national frameworks published since the first was introduced in 2004 and evaluates them against the model outline in Chapter 2. The authors suggest that that political expediency and speed of delivery have played a greater role in their development than improving services, increasing public safety and providing assurance to the public. It therefore highlights some key areas for improvement in both the national framework and in its implementation.

Details

Rebuilding the Fire and Rescue Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-758-9

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Juris Dilevko

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study about how academic librarians can contribute to the interdisciplinary research endeavors of professors and students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study about how academic librarians can contribute to the interdisciplinary research endeavors of professors and students, especially doctoral candidates, through an intellectualized approach to collection development.

Design/methodology/approach

In the wake of protest movements such as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street, colleges and universities have begun to develop courses about these events, and it is anticipated that there will be much research conducted about their respective histories. Academic librarians can participate in those research efforts by developing interdisciplinary collections about protest movements and by referring researchers to those collections.

Findings

Through a case‐study approach, this paper provides a narrative bibliography about Southern Agrarianism that can help professors and students interested in the Tea Party or Occupy Wall Street movements to see their research endeavors from a new interdisciplinary perspective.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in presenting a concrete example of the way in which academic librarians can become active research partners through the work of building collections and recommending sources in areas that professors and students may not have previously considered.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Feminist Activists on Brexit: From the Political to the Personal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-421-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Caroline Gatrell

Drawing upon notions of agency and the body, the purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of agency as a gendered concept through a consideration of women…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon notions of agency and the body, the purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of agency as a gendered concept through a consideration of women sex‐workers. Specifically, the paper analyses how far women sex‐workers may be regarded as social agents. It then considers how far notions of agency, in relation to sex‐workers' embodied boundaries, may be gendered.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews existing literature on sex‐workers and sex‐work practices, looking at indoor sex‐work (massage parlours), outdoor sex‐work (street sex‐work) and trafficking. It considers these types of sex‐work in relation to agency, gender and the body.

Findings

The paper acknowledges the diversity of women's experience within different aspects of the sex trade. The paper recognizes claims that treating sex‐workers as “victims” could further jeopardize their social position. However, the paper finds that the “options” available to sex‐workers are severely constrained. Specifically, the lack of capacity among sex‐workers to set embodied “rules of engagement” with clients makes the notion of agency problematic. The paper contends that “agency” is itself a gendered concept not only in relation to sex‐work, but also in the context of women's work more broadly.

Practical implications

Through the idea of agency as a gendered concept, the paper offers alternative ways of exploring agency, the body and women's work.

Originality/value

The paper puts forward the notion of agency as a gendered concept. This opens up possibilities for further research on women's “choices”, and who “makes the rules” within different labour markets.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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