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Article

Sheelagh Wickham, Malcolm Brady, Sarah Ingle, Caroline McMullan, Mairéad Nic Giolla Mhichíl and Ray Walshe

Ideally, quality should be, and is, an integral element of education, yet capturing and articulating quality is not simple. Programme quality reviews in third-level…

Abstract

Purpose

Ideally, quality should be, and is, an integral element of education, yet capturing and articulating quality is not simple. Programme quality reviews in third-level education can demonstrate quality and identify areas for improvement, offering many potential benefits. However, details on the process of quality programme review are limited in the literature. This study aims to report on the introduction of a standardised programme review process in one university.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a standardised template, the annual programme review (APR) process captured student voice, external examiner reports, statistical data and action/s since the previous review. Following completion of programme reviews across the university, the APR process was itself evaluated using questionnaires and focus groups.

Findings

Findings showed that the programme chairs understood the rationale for the review, welcomed the standardised format and felt the information could inform future programme planning. However, in the focus group, issues arose about the timing, ownership and possible alternate use of the data collected in the course of the review.

Research limitations/implications

This case study demonstrates the experience of APR in a single third-level institution, therefore, limiting generalisability.

Practical implications

APR offers a comprehensive record of the programme that can be carried out with efficacy and efficiency. The study illustrates one institution’s experience, and this may assist others in using similar quality evaluation tools. Using APR allows quality to be measured, articulated and improved.

Social implications

Using APR allows quality, or its lack to be to be measured, articulated and improved in the delivery of education at a third-level institution.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the experience of the introduction of an APR process in one higher education institute. Programme review is an important and essential part of academia in the 21st century. At third level, quality assurance is, or should be, a central part of academic programmes and delivery. The review of the first implementation has provided valuable information that will inform future programme review processes. Academic programmes grow, evolve and need to be reviewed regularly. It is hoped that the information reported here will aid others developing academic review procedures.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article

Ray Grange, Graham Heaslip and Caroline McMullan

The purpose of this paper is to identify how coordination has evolved in humanitarian logistics (HL), what were the triggers for change and how have they been facilitated.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how coordination has evolved in humanitarian logistics (HL), what were the triggers for change and how have they been facilitated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a systematic literature review of academic journals.

Findings

This is the first paper to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context. The research revealed that network coordination has moved on in the commercial sector to include orchestration and now, choreography concepts which have not been tested in HL literature. This reveals a lag exists between HL research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an exploratory study and provides the basis for further research on the concepts of orchestration and choreography in HL. The paper sets a research agenda for academics.

Practical implications

This paper is the first to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context.

Originality/value

The areas of orchestration and choreography have received limited consideration within the humanitarian aid logistics literature to date. This paper is designed to redress this shortfall. As a result, it is hoped that it will act as a catalyst for further research and to widen and deepen the resultant debate with a view to improving the outcome for those affected by current and future disasters.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article

David S. Jacobson, Caroline McMullan and Christos Minas

The purpose of this paper is to show the relationship between food as a shared good (or public within the household) in the economic sense, and food as a shared meal in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the relationship between food as a shared good (or public within the household) in the economic sense, and food as a shared meal in the sociological sense.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data derived from a household budget survey (HBS) in Cyprus are used to set up questions to which answers are suggested using the qualitative approach of in-depth interviews.

Findings

The main finding is that the relatively high expenditure by elderly couples on food for home consumption may be explained by frequent inter-household, intra-extended family meals in Cyprus.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides evidence that household expenditure on food may not be directly indicative of household consumption of food. Researchers interested in household consumption of food should therefore be aware of the differences between household and extended family and, where extended family continues to be significant, they should be wary of using data from HBSs to analyse food consumption. One limitation is that the results are derived from in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of nine households. It may be appropriate to replicate the study, either in Cyprus or in similar societies where extended family remains significant, at a larger scale.

Practical implications

The evidence that household expenditure may not be indicative of household consumption suggests that questions on social context of consumption should be included in HBSs.

Originality/value

This paper draws together, for the first time, economic ideas on expenditure on food derived from the quantitative research of Ernst Engel on one hand and implications of the theories of Georg Simmel on the sociology of the meal on the other. The paper shows that some issues arising from quantitative analysis of HBSs cannot be explained using data from that source; this is particularly so where consumption of food is inter-household.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Caroline Keown‐McMullan

Crises are hitting our industries with alarming regularity. Yet the word crisis is usually used with little thought to its meaning. Examines the various meanings which…

Abstract

Crises are hitting our industries with alarming regularity. Yet the word crisis is usually used with little thought to its meaning. Examines the various meanings which have been proposed by authors in the field of crisis management, and contends that for a situation to develop into a crisis three elements must be present: a triggering event causing significant change or having the potential to cause significant change; the perceived inability to cope with this change; and a threat to the existence of the foundation of the organization.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

Adrian Palmer, Rosalind Beggs and Caroline Keown‐McMullan

Failure to consistently deliver promises is a likely outcome for high contact services. While many organizations create blueprints to recover from service failures, these…

Abstract

Failure to consistently deliver promises is a likely outcome for high contact services. While many organizations create blueprints to recover from service failures, these tend to focus on production processes rather than the individual needs of customers. Develops a framework based on equity, for studying the effects on customers of service failure and recovery. In a study of restaurant customers, the construct of equity is found to be significantly correlated with respondents’ intention to repurchase. Significant differences in equity were observed between genders and age groups, suggesting that service recovery processes should be more closely tailored to the demographic characteristics of customers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Angela Hegarty and Caroline Keown

There exist many forms of discrimination. Different societies have developed varying approaches to the problem but most have evolved some legal prohibition. Of course…

Abstract

There exist many forms of discrimination. Different societies have developed varying approaches to the problem but most have evolved some legal prohibition. Of course there are many other ways in which the problem of discrimination can be tackled and this article will touch on some of those. However here the principal concern is with the law both as a tool for redressing disadvantage and as a social signal of the seriousness with which inequality is viewed.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

Kathryn Penaluna, Andy Penaluna, Caroline Usei and Dinah Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon the process that underpinned and informed the development and delivery of a “creativity-led” credit-bearing teacher training…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon the process that underpinned and informed the development and delivery of a “creativity-led” credit-bearing teacher training provision and to illuminate key factors of influence for the approaches to teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the assumption that sustaining enterprise education involves developing educator capacity, networks of collaborating educators from different institutions and subject disciplines developed transdisciplinary pedagogical strategies. These were delivered to two pilot programmes, with a cohort of 18 in each.

Findings

Feedback from the pilots suggest that creativity-based pedagogies are effective triggers. They motivate educators and enable specialists to develop subject-related content.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need for a more developed understanding of creativity, innovation and opportunity recognition, so that enterprise education starts with ideas generation, not merely ideas evaluation.

Originality/value

Understanding creativity and innovation is emergent and there is a dearth of understanding, especially in teaching and learning for enterprise. The paper illuminates a developmental process that has responded to this shortfall.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Michelle M. Hammond, Caroline Murphy and Caitlin A. Demsky

The current study aims to examine stress mindset as a moderator of the relationship between the work–family interface – work–family conflict (WFC) and enrichment (WFE) …

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to examine stress mindset as a moderator of the relationship between the work–family interface – work–family conflict (WFC) and enrichment (WFE) – and two work outcomes: job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine these relationships, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Ireland (N = 314). Bootstrapping in SPSS was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

In addition to direct relationships between WFC/WFE and job satisfaction and turnover intentions, analyses showed that stress mindset is a moderator of the relationships between WFC and job satisfaction and turnover intentions, as well as of the relationship between WFE and job satisfaction, but not WFE and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Providing general support of the propositions of the conservation of resources theory, stress mindset was found to act as a personal resource affecting the relationships between WFC/WFE and most outcomes. The study findings indicate a need to further examine stress mindset in relation to employees' work and family interface.

Practical implications

In line with other research, this study recommends organizational efforts to reduce WFC and increase WFE. Further, as stress mindsets can be altered, practitioners may consider implementing stress mindset training to encourage employees' view of stress as enhancing rather than debilitating to reduce the negative impact of stress on employees in the workplace.

Social implications

Beliefs about the enhancing aspects of stress may allow employees to more effectively navigate transitions between work and family domains and maximize beneficial aspects of participating in both work and family roles.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to investigate the role of stress mindset as a moderator of the associations between the work–family interface and employee work-related outcomes. The findings are relevant to work–family researchers, managers and human resource professionals.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Article

Ghizlane Arifine, Reto Felix and Olivier Furrer

Although multi-brand loyalty (MBL) in consumer markets has been identified in previous brand loyalty research, empirical studies have not yet explored the facets of its…

Abstract

Purpose

Although multi-brand loyalty (MBL) in consumer markets has been identified in previous brand loyalty research, empirical studies have not yet explored the facets of its different types. This paper aims to have a deeper understanding of MBL by investigating its different types and facets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a sequential, qualitatively driven mixed-method design consisting of in-depth interviews and supplementary survey research.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that mood congruence, identity enhancement, unavailability risk reduction and market competition are the most important facets that explains the two types of MBL (complementary-based and product substitutes). Furthermore, the findings show that the family factor can motivate consumers to be multi-brand loyal by adding brands to an initially family-endorsed brand.

Research limitations/implications

This study advances the conceptual foundations of MBL and extends previous research on brand loyalty. Some of the findings may be limited to the economic and cultural context of relatively affluent countries with an abundance of market offers.

Practical implications

Marketing managers gain insights into how to manage brand loyalty and how to transition from MBL to single-brand loyalty.

Originality/value

The study generates novel insights into the facets of different types of MBL.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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