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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Daniel Robert Stubbings, Kyle Hughes and Caroline Limbert

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of staff towards psychotropic Pro Re Nata (PRN) medication in a residential care setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of staff towards psychotropic Pro Re Nata (PRN) medication in a residential care setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Three male and seven female participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four themes pertaining to PRN medication emerged from the data: behaviour change, calming effect, importance of timing and perceived uniqueness.

Research limitations/implications

The participant group was not homogenous and findings may have been different in a more qualified cohort. This care setting may not be representative of other environments where PRN medication is administered. The findings do, however, highlight some of the challenges facing the administration of PRN medication in mental health and care settings.

Practical implications

The awareness of these themes is significant for improving staff knowledge, training practices and policies towards the use and administration of psychotropic PRN medication.

Originality/value

This is the first study to engage in a thematic analysis of staff views towards the administration of PRN medication.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Keely Brookes, Jeremy Peters and Caroline Limbert

“VTE Assess Prevent” is a unique communications campaign designed to educate and remind all front-line staff to risk assess inpatients for venous thromboembolism (VTE) (blood…

Abstract

Purpose

“VTE Assess Prevent” is a unique communications campaign designed to educate and remind all front-line staff to risk assess inpatients for venous thromboembolism (VTE) (blood clots) and to provide those at risk with the recommended preventative treatment. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the VTE communications campaign from the perspective of the front line staff at a UK hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire implementing both qualitative and quantitative methods was made available to all relevant frontline staff at the hospital via online and paper copies (n=319).

Findings

Overall positive attitudes towards the design and content of the campaign materials were reported. The campaign had a considerable impact on staff awareness of the importance of risk assessing for VTE and the extent to which risk assessments were carried out. High levels of reported behaviour change were reported as a consequence of the campaign. Recommendations for future communication campaigns included making the communication materials more memorable and enhancing the sense of control that people have over the procedure. Also, improving normative and outcome beliefs, running the communications campaign alongside a programme of education and including monitoring and feedback of performance were recommended.

Originality/value

Reducing the number of deaths attributable to hospital acquired VTE is a clinical priority within the health services in many countries. The findings from this study highlight the role of the VTE campaign in achieving this goal, provide an insight into the key components of an effective communication campaign and identify recommendations for future campaigns.

Details

Health Education, vol. 113 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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