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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2019

Valentine Weydert, Pierre Desmet and Caroline Lancelot-Miltgen

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how offering control on data usage and offering money can increase willingness to share private information with a data broker.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how offering control on data usage and offering money can increase willingness to share private information with a data broker.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal data are collected for internet users with a Web questionnaire. In an experimental framework, compensations control money are manipulated and consumers’ data sharing is explained by sensitivity and regulatory focus.

Findings

Offering control increases willingness to disclose personal data, even sensitive one, but the effect is not moderated by regulatory focus. Offering monetary compensation has a negative, but small, effect on willingness to share personal data, and the effect is moderated by regulatory focus.

Originality/value

Offering a large amount of money is a double-edged offer, as it creates a signal that increases potential negative effect of disclosing personal data to unknown third party.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Pascale Ezan, Gaelle Pantin-Sohier and Caroline Lancelot-Miltgen

A product colour plays an important role in consumers’ preferences. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the impact of the three-dimensional character of colour…

Abstract

Purpose

A product colour plays an important role in consumers’ preferences. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the impact of the three-dimensional character of colour (brightness, saturation and vividness) on children’s behaviour towards a food product and as a source of well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted. Study 1 was conducted with 62 children and used four visuals of syrup presenting two colours (red/green) and two variations of vividness (vivid/dim). Study 2 was conducted with 70 children and used four pictures of stewed apples and four pictures of pouches to test the influence of each dimension of colour on children’s preferences for the product and the product packaging.

Findings

Results show that the three-dimensional character of colour plays an important role in children’s gustatory inferences and well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The study is restricted to one food product (in each study) habitually consumed by children. Other products could be investigated to show how colour can contribute to children’s well-being.

Practical implications

The paper addresses the issue of well-being as a potential brand-positioning element.

Social implications

The paper suggests new avenues to use the brightness/saturation or vividness of a product or packaging colour as a potential element to arouse positive sensations that generate children’s well-being even when the product is not a preferred one.

Originality/value

This works initiates creative thinking concerning the impact of a product colour on children consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Jörg Henseler

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Abstract

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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